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Full text of "Inglenook, The (1904)"

fi^ccession 



^ 2.8905 

Accession No..'. 'X„.?^ Call No.._?l-'5/-. 

Bethany Theological Library 

3435 W. VanBuren St. 
Chicago, III. 



RULES 

This book mav be kept for two weeks 
with privilege of renewal for two weeks. 

Fine of two cents charged for each day- 
books are overdue. 



DATE DUE 


DEI 76 


































































































































































V>c5) 




A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




JVIain Street, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. 



^ 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



January 5, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 1, Volume VI 



EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., CHICAGO, ILL. 



OurEquity"siK- 

$24.40 to $28.50 

Complete with Beservoir and Ri^li 
Warming' Closet, just as illustrated. 
When wanted we furnish OUR EQUITY 
™ade of the best BLUE POLISHED STEEL 
"LATE. 

The additional cost for the rangefurnish 
ed in bl\;e polished sieel plate in place ul 
regular japanned finish amounts to $1 95 
If rangelsorderedturnifhed in Hlue Polish 
Stell Plate, add $1 96 to prit-e <iuoted 
below. 

For detail descrictlon refer two pages 
back whare the full describtion is given 
01 our Equity hig-hest "grade steel 
Range 

THIS ILLUSTRATION 

sbows the range with high shelf, wanning 
clt s(t and reservoir. The most comi>lete 
Steel Range on the market. 

High Warming Clostt. Tea Pot Shelves. 
Br<iicr-f(id door. Eegisler draft, Dupii i 
Giate. Diaw-out gr; te door, large fire and 
ash pit doors, sprir.g balanced ovf n dn...r. 
clean oi t door, lai ge reservoir, large main 
lop wiih six cooking hoks. 

Elegantly Nickel trimmed hand- 
somely mounted, and the best range 
tL at money tan buy. 

Our Equity Has the Best Fire Box con- 
structed with Duplex Grate Burns Hard 
or Soft Coal or Wood. 

Special Grate and Fire Box for Burn- 
ing LIGNITE Furnished when wanted 
For 11.30. 




Miserable all the Time! 



That is the way a man described his feeUngs. How- 
many more are there not who feel the same way ! A 
careful observer has estimated that nine out of ten 
people are not really well. Something is wrong all 
the time. Nobody wants to be sick just for the fun of 
it, and nearly everybody tries one thing and another in 
the vain hope that it will cure him ; but in most cases 
he finds himself no better for the trial. 

There is no good reason why such people cannot be 
cured if they go about it in the right way. But what 
is the right way ? some one will ask ! The only per- 
manent and satisfactory remedy for most of the trou- 
bles of mankind is that which will invigorate and 
strengthen the entire system. 

This can only be done by getting at the cause of the 
trouble, the impure or weakened condition of the 
blood. No one whose blood is pure and vigorous can 
be sick. In this way we are able to assist nature in 
restoring the natural condition. When the blood has 
been cleansed and strengthened, disease cannot re- 
main. There are many good medicines, let us hope, 
for this purpose, but the one that has been especially 
successful is DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER. 
Over a century's constant use has demonstarted its 
power. 

SAYS IT DID WONDERS. 

St. Louis, Mo., Oct, 2ist, 1903. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I should like to become an agent for your 
Blood Vitalizer. I know I can sell a great deal among 
ni}' friends and relatives. Let me know how to become 
an agent and I shall send you an order right away. Your 
Blood Vitalizer has simply done wonders for me. It has 
cured me of a stomach trouble with which I have been 
suffering for over six years. No doctor nor any medicine 
I have tried has helped me. I was bedfast weeks at a 
time. This disease seems to lie in our family and I want 
all of them to use it. 

Please let me hear from you. Very gratefully, 

6141 Ella Ave. Mrs. H. Herr. 

A BLESSING TO MANY. 

.\pple Creek. Ohio, July 2nd, 1903. 
Dr. P. Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I have to acknowledge that your Blood Vi- 
talizer has proved to be a blessing to many. This is 
especially the case in our own famib'. We knew nothing 
about your Blood Vitalizer when our familj- was small, 
six in number. One winter we were all sick, but since 
keeping the Blood Vitalizer we have had no sickness in 
the house, although we are now eleven. We would nev- 
er want to be without it in the house. 



With heartfelt appreciation and many friendly greet- 
ings, I remain Verj' truly yours, 

Peter Schmid. 

CURED A SCROFULOUS ERUPTION. 

Rockville, Conn., Dec. 27. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — Quite a while ago. I guess about 25 years, 
when I was still in Germany, I was taken sick and a 
scrofulous eruption broke out on my hands and the upper 
part of my body. I got so bad I was unable to follow 
my occupation of weaver. I tried doctors and medicines 
without end but nothing helped me. When I came to 
America, I saw an article in a paper about your Blood 
Vitalizer and made up my mind to try it, which I did. 
As my ailment was old and long standing it took some 
time before I noticed any improvement, but I kept on 
taking the Blood Vitalizer. Finally I saw I was getting 
better and in time I was completely cured. I am to-day 
entirely well. I would not think of being without your 
Blood Vitalizer in the family. Since keeping it on hand 
we have escaped sickness, for which I thank God. 

Yours truly, 

72 Grand Ave. Wm. Drechsler. 

A MERCHANT WRITES. 

Le Mars, Iowa, .-Vpril i6th, '03. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — Permit me to send you the happy message 
that my wife who has doctored for years and tried all 
kinds of medicines without avail is cured through the use 
of your Blood Vitalizer. It has brought a complete 
change in her. She is now so jolly and full of life, it does 
one good to see her. I am glad she is well at last and 
able to enjoy life. She is only sorry that she did not use 
your remarkable medicine sooner. I could tell you other 
wonders about your medicine. 

With deepest respect. Yours truly, 

Sixth St. Paul Neubel, General Merchant. 

The writer of one of the above letters of testi- 
monial, in referring to his wife and her cure through 
the use of DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER, 
says : " She is now so jolly and full of life that it 
does one good to- see her." That is just as it should 
be. It is natural enough. When health returns there 
is no room for gloom and sadness. DR. PETER'S 
BLOOD VITALIZER has brought sunshine into 
many a home by relieving suffering and curing dis- 
ease. • 

LTnlike other medicines, it is not to be had in drug- 
stores, but is supplied by special agents. For fur- 
ther particulars address the sole proprietor. 



DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, III. 



>. t .. t . t .. ; .. | . a . ■ |Mt»i .. t . » . i . » . t . »» i t '- i - ■ >»»< ■»<'<■ a '*' t ' • ! ■ »» • ; ■ • t< 'a'a'»»»a' » *****- t ' »*»»» »' t ' < < 4 ' » * 



The Brethren Church 



:: 1 



AT 



STERLING, COLORADO, 
Was Dedicated Sunday, November 8th, 1903. 



p v •l"i' •J' ■? 



THE MISSIONARY AND TRACT COMMITTEE 

Have Just Purchased 

Two of Our Irrigated Farms Near Sterling. 



I 



m^ WE HAVE SOLD -S i 

t 

I 

Thousands of acres to the Brethren during the past 18 months, and are f 
now corresponding with hundreds of members in various States who have * 
become interested in THE GREAT SOUTH PLaTTE VALLEY, COLO. 






I 



F you want to knovi^ something about the countr}' that everybody is 

talking about at present, where land produces big crops and sure 

crops, where the people are healthy, prosperous and enterprising, and are 

ready and wil iny to give you a hearty welcome to locate with them, 

WRITE US FOR FREE ADVERTISING MATTER 
AND GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The Colorado Colony Company, 

STERLING, COLORADO. 

'"V'S* V V V ■!' V v* 



TH^ INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING 



.TO... 



STERLING, COLO., 



...CALIFORNIA... 

Lordsburg, the Laguna De Tache 
Grant, Tropico 

Or. Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Utah 
and California Points. 



READ THIS. 



" I bought two years ago three acres unimproved and 
without water right, in Tropico, built a six-room cottage, 
and made other improvements, so that the whole cost me 
about $l,8oo. I sold at $1,200 per acre. Made in the op- 
eration $i,8ao. There are yet some chances here for those 
who will believe and go to work." M, M. Eshelman. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

, "The Overland Route" 

And IS the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri River 
to all principal points West. Business men and others can 
save many hours via this line. Call on or address a postal 
card to your nearest ticket agent, or 

E. L. LOMAX. Q. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Well Adapted for Beet Sugar Factory. 



This year has marked the establishment of the sugar 
beet industry upon a large and substantial basis. In 
1902 the Chamber of Commerce fostered the new pur- 
suit by having twenty acres planted to sugar beets, 
such satisfactory results being secured from this experi- 
mental field that arrangements for the erection of a 
sugar factory were taken up and gratifying progress 
has been made. Under contract for delivery to estab- 
lished factories at a distance, the people of this county 
are growing 3,000 acres of sugar beets this year. 

Pay Roll $1,000 A Day. 

Citizens of Logan county are not boasting of what 
they can do or have done, but the pay roll to laborers 
engaged in cultivation of our beet crop has reached a 
total of $1,000 per day for many days. Growing of this 
crop has afforded employment for all persons who 
could work and desired to do so. The usual street 
game of marbles has lost its supporters, and the youth- 
ful population of from ten to fourteen years of age is 
earnestly assisting in the care and cultivation of the 
crop, earning $1.50 to $2.00 per day. Many of the Ster- 
ling boys have bank accounts ranging from $15 to $50. 
Aside from the financial benefit accruing from this la- 
bor it should be remembered that the boy who learns to 
till the soil is making a practical study of the founda- 
tion upon which all national government must rest, and 
what is more, especially the base for the commerce of 
the world. No nobler work can be performed than as- 
sisting Nature to supply the wants of the human family. 

Sterling is the seat of Logan county, located on the 
South Platte river and on the Union Pacific railroad. 
It is destined to remain the metropolis of northeastern 
Colorado. With 100,000 acres of the highest type of 
agricultural lands surrounding and under a perfect sys- 
tem of irrigation established in 1870, a third of a cen- 
tury ago, Sterling is possessed of the necessary condi- 
tions to become a city of 10,000 population. Enterprise 
and thrift of our citizens have required that in all things 
municipal the city shall be fully abreast of the times. 
There is now in course of construction one of. the most 
perfect systems of waterworks in the commonwealth. 
Pure water from the wonderful Springdale springs is 
being pumped a distance of 'six miles to supply the 
needs of the city. 

In recognition of the substantial growth made in the 
county the railroad has erected a handsome passenger 
station at Sterling, costing $20,000. Many substantial 
business blocks have recently been built by local capi- 
talists who have unbounded faith in the future of the 
South Platte valley. School facilities are not inferior 
to those of any locality in the State. A new school 
building has just been completed for the intermediate 
grades at a cost of $20,000 and our high school ranks 
with those of other cities of the State. The moral and 
spiritual welfare of our people is splendidly provided 
for by eight church organizations, having six houses 
of worship. The Presbyterians. Methodist Episcopal, 
Baptist, Dunker Brethren, German Evangelical and 
Catholic are the denominations having church build- 
ings. — Ranche News, Denver, Colo. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Sterling, Colorado, 

nvrp pi Dp Plus $2.00, for the Round Trip First 
\Jntj rAKCf and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



;^ w r^ A ¥ ¥ /~V is the beat-watered arid State in America. Brethren are moving there because hot winds, ^ 

^ \ I 3 1^. I I % # deitractive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate it makes life ^ 

bright and worth living. ^ 

We hare great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler and if you have in miad a change 8* 

for the general improvemeat in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, ^ 

we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that £ 

is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to answer and many conditions to investigate. g 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad fares t« ^ 

investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. ^ 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see for your- ^ 

self. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. ^ 

Settlers' Ofle=way Rates from March 1 to April 30, 1904. | 

FROM To Pocatello, Huntington. ^ 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa. etc. ^ 

Chicago, $30 00 $30 50 ^ 

St. Louis 26 00 27 50 ^ 

Peoria, 28 oo 28 50 ^ 

Kansas City and Omaha 20 00 22 50 ^ 

Sioux City, 22 90 25 40 ^ 

St. Paul and Minneapolis, 22 go 25 40 ^ 







MODEL RANCH, IDAHO. 



1^ Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
'^ Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. 



Fine 



iS Nampa, Idaho. ^ 

^ I came to Idaho two years ago from the best part of eastern Kansas. I had done no work for a year ob ac- 5^ 

^ count of poor health. One year here brought me all right and this year 1 farmed and made more money from J' 

^ 80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my potatoes were ahead, making 600 ^ 

5 bushels per acre. Joshua James. ^ 



2 S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 

^ J. H. QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



Mention the INGLENOOK when writlM- 



D. E. BURLEY, > 

G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R.R„ ^ 

Salt Lake City, Utah. % 

4oti3 ^: 



i felNgLtNgOK 



Vol. VI. 



■January 5, 1904. 



No. 1. 



"EN VOYAGE.' 



BY CAROLINE ATHF.KTON MASON. 



Whichever way the wind doth blow. 
Some heart is glad to have it so; 
Then, blow it east, or blow it west, 
The wind that blows, that wind is best. 

My little craft sails not alone; 
.A. thousand fleets from every zone 
Are out upon a thousand seas; 
What blows for one a favoring breeze 
!Might dash another with the shock 
Of doom upon some hidden rock. 

And so I do not dare to pray 

For winds to waft me on my way. 

But leave it to a higher Will 

To stay or speed me, trusting still 

That all is well, and sure that he 

Who launched my bark will sail with mg 

Through storm and calm, and will not fail 
Whatever breezes may prevail. 
To land me, every peril past. 
Within the sheltered haven at last. 

Then, whatsoever wind doth blow. 
My heart is glad to have it so; 
Then, blow it east, or blow it west, 
The wind that blows, that wind is best. 

♦ * ♦ 

JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



Bezvarc of the stranger zvith a sure thing for you. 



The grand cure for all of our miseries is zvork. 



There is no true habit except the habit of holiness. 



If you have nothing to say, say nothing and stick to 



ll'orry is a zvolf. 

All things are sacred in a zi^ay. 

Give zvillingly, but thoughtfully. 

Not dozjuny is the dozvnzujard road. 

The szueetest revenge soon turns sour. 

Duty is the first condition of existence. 



For some people it is not necessary to say " thank 
ye " zvhen they receive a present. They look it. 



it. 



Before the oyster can have a pearl it must lie still 
and suffer. 

A zvife rarely keeps a husband poor that zvould be 
rich any otlier zvay. 

He zi'ho zs/ears the shoe that pinches knozvs best 
zvhere it hurts most. 

Secrets are like money — do the most good or harm 
zvhen in circulation. 

Our hearts are like heaven in that the more angels 
there are the more room there is. 

* , 

A bachelor has one great advantage over the mar- 
ried man. He can still get married. 

It is a noble life to live above the uncharitableness of 
discontent zvhich surrounds us on all sides. 



Don't pray to have the roots of evil taken out of 
you while you hold on to the fruits zvith both hands. 

The people zvlio don't like caruiare or Roquefort have 
no reason to be ashamed unless they pretend to like it. 

When a zuoman's in love she thinks there is no other 
man in the zvorld. When a man's in love he thinks the 
same. 

* 

Just zvhen a man is sure that a zvoman never hits 
anything she aims at, along conies a blushing young 
thing who marries him. 



THI 



INGI-EINOOK. 



FREE PASSES. 



Almost everybody has heard of passes on a railroad 
and they are earnestly coveted by most people. Now 
it is a fact that the man who has a pass is apt to spend 
more money than most people. The reason for this is 
that he goes so much oftener than if he had to buy his 
ticket. 

Over in England they do this thing differently and 
London Answers, in talking about this, gives some 
interesting statistics. 

One of the hard and dry facts in connection with rail- 
ways is the giving of free passes, made of gold, to a 
favored few, who have rendered some signal service to 
the companies. 

Speaking generally, all railway companies keep a 
very jealous eye over that pass clerk, an official who 
usually has a sitting in the general manager's office, 
and who has to submit to his pass books being checked 
regularly. A voucher for a free pass has to be signed 
by one of the responsible heads personally, and the 
number of these heads is very limited. Without this 
signed voucher no free pass over a compan\'s line can 
be issued. 

Some companies keep a pass clerk in the passenger 
superintendent's office, but his duty is mainly the is- 
suing of passes to the company's servants who have to 
proceed down the line on company business, and the 
voucher in this instance is usually marked " O. C. S." 
I-'asses for traveling over another company's system — 
they are usually called " foreign " passes — have, as a 
rule, to be obtained from or through the general man- 
ager's pass clerk. 

But apart from a company's official passes, includ- 
ing the permanent free passes held by the dircccors, 
heads of departments and traveling inspectors and 
special ticket collectors, all these passes being marked 
" From any station to any station," there are special 
passes ordered by the express command of the direc- 
tors. These passes are called " special " in more senses 
than one. They are so called because they are issued to 
people who have usually no direct interest in the ad- 
ministration of a railway companv's system ; they 
are usually not officials or servants of the company, 
but absolute strangers. They are granted to the lat- 
ter for some public reason or given in return for 
some specific service the holder has rendered 
to the company. They are extremely rare, but, never- 
theless, they exist. 

.\nd these special free passes are not made out in the 
ordinary way and issued like other permanent free 
])asses — that is, made up of cardboard covered with 
cloth and black or gold lettered ; on the contrary, ac- 
cording to the value of the services which have been 
rendered they are either turned out in solid gold and 
suitably engraved or perhaps they are silver-plated. 
But if the directors think that the recipient is worthy 



of precious metal and to show the former's deep ap- 
preciation of what has been done to merit the dis- 
tinction of such a special permanent free pass, the pass 
is usually ordered to be made up in gold and beauti- 
fully engraved. 

Such a pass, made of solid gold, is now included 
among the treasures of the bishop of Gloucester. He 
got it for distingttished services which his lordship 
rendered to the passengers who suffered the misfortune 
of meeting with a railroad disaster recently on the east 
coast. It is composed of solid gold, is suitably en- 
graved, it will carry the bishop anywhere on the com- 
pany's system and it is a permanent first-class pass, 
with iio restrictions whatever. His lordship carries it 
in the form of a trinket, being constructed on the lines 
of a watch chain charm. 

Lord James Hereford also has a solid gold rail- 
way pass. This was given for services of, a different 




LOS ANGIiLES FUEIGHT STATION, ROCK ISLAND ROUTE, 
SHOWING MISSION STYLE OF ARCHITECTURE. 

character from those rendered by the bishop of Glou- 
cester. While the latter's gold pass carries the bishop 
over the Southeastern railway. Lord James' gold pass 
carries his lordship " from any station to any station '' 
on the Northeastern railway. 

This valuable gift was presented to his lordship by the 
directors of the company named to mark their ap- 
preciation of the great service Lord James rendered 
in the celebrated dispute that raged a little while ago 
between the directors of the company and a very use- 
ful portion of their outdoor staff. 

That dispute threatened at one stage of the proceed- 
ings to dislocate the whole of the traffic on that rail- 
way, but Lord James was called in as arbitrator and 
mainly through his instrumentality the dispute came 
to an end, his award pleasing both sides. His own 
award followed in the shape of the solid gold pass. 

Besides those already menlioiied three others arc 
held by prominent members of parliament, these men 
being railway directors. One is the chairman of the 
(Jreat Northern and the other two are, if we mistake 
not, Mr. Mellor and Cosmo Bonsor, the two latter 
nun being connected with lines which have done yeo- 



HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



man service in the railway world. iNIr. Mellor is on 
the board of the Metropolitan and Mr. Bonsor on that 
of the Southeastern, and all these legislators have 
worked hard on various railway bills. 

In addition to this \'. C. of railway patronage di- 
rectors or railways carry out the same principle, but 
in a less expensive form, for services rendered by any 
of the public in cases of emergency by the conferring 
of special free passes of a second degree. These are 
specially designed leather permits, which are available 
from point to point of a railway company's system, 
and, unlike ordinary season or common passes, need 
never be renewed, except when, perhaps, wear and 
tear necessitates the giving up of the old pass for a 
new one. 

To get a permanent free pass of this class, a man 
must have done something for which the company is 
grateful. It may be, perhaps, for some act of cour- 
age — like that, for example, performed by Oliver Fish- 
er of Horsham, who once averted a disaster on the 
Brighton line. Seeing a log of wood thrown across 
the rails, as he was out for a walk one day, he jumped 
onto the line and removed it just in the nick of time 
■ for an express to pass. 

Naturally, it would not do' for a railway company to 
give away on a wholesale scale permanent free passes 
to all who think they ought to have them. So there 
is in vogue among the railway companies a third divi- 
sion, or class, and anyone who is fortunate enough to 
be gazetted to it can get a free pass of the ordinary 
kind whenever he wants it. 

But, as in the other cases already mentioned, this 
favor, which, again, is rarely conferred, is only award- 
ed for distinguished services. Railway accidents are 
few and very far between in these days of train-signal- 
ing improvements, but when one does happen and will- 
ing hands help, the company on whose line the afifair 
has happened gives no money awards, but, instead, the 
names and addresses of helpers are taken and made 
a note of at headquarters, and a letter of thanks fol- 
lows, together with the information that whenever a 
pass is required for a holiday jaunt the company will 
be pleased to issue one under the special circumstances. 

That is the usual mode, but it is subject to modifi- 
cation, according to the rules and regulations of the 
difi'erent companies. 

<Jt- *^ ♦J* 

FEATS OF COWBOYS. 



S.VYS a correspondent describing a recent fair at 
Albuquerque, N. M. : At 3 o'clock a drove of wild 
Texan steers were turned loose in the inclosure, and 
a large number of cowboys began the task of lassoing 
them, the boy who lassoed the greatest number to be 
declared the winner. It was a glorious sight — those 
stalwart young men mounted upon broncho horses of 



the highest mettle and speed, their brown cheeks glow- 
ing with health, and their dark e\es flashing with ex- 
citement. The fence around the inside of the race- 
track had been removed, and on the large oval of green 
turf in front of the grand stand the steers go plunging 
and tossing, and the boys go riding after them like so 
man\- incarnate whirlwinds. Every now and then an 
infuriated steer would make straight for a broncho, 
bent on goring the life out of him and his rider, but 
the alert cowboy, with his high-spirited steed under 
the most perfect control, by a single turn of his bridle 
hand would wheel him deftly aside and the fierce bo- 
vine would catch nothing on his horns save the cir- 
cumambient air. The skill displayed in riding and 
managing the bronchos and throwing the lasso was 
simply marvelous. Casting the running noose over 
the head of the steer while riding at full speed was the 
most insignificant part of the performance. With the 
most perfect ease the cowboys would place it around 
any one of the animal's legs. This is a most difficult 
feat, and the skill requisite to its accomplishment can 
only be acquired by long and patient practice. Even 
then he who seeks to become proficient in it must have 
an inborn aptitude and dexterity of eye and hand. 
To perform it the cowboy must determine the spot 
upon which the swiftly-running animal will next set 
the foot of the leg around which he desires to draw 
the noose. Upon this spot he must throw the lasso, 
and the moment the steer has placed his foot within 
its slip-knot he must, by a peculiar, indescribable mo- 
tion of his hand and arm, draw it up above the crea- 
ture's knee and quickly pull it taut. This feat was ac- 
complished many times during the progress of the 
tournament ; indeed, the number of failures was very 
insignificant in proportion to the number of trials. 

The riding was equal to the lassoing. There seems 
to be no possible position, however difficult or un- 
natural, and no combination of circumstances, however 
unfortuitous, in which a cowboy cannot maintain his 
equilibrium upon and his absolute and complete con- 
trol of a broncho horse, an animal naturally so wild 
and vicious that very few of the most venturesome 
and accomplished riders, outside of Mexicans, Indians 
and cowboys, would dare even to mount him. The 
man who will show the people of the Eastern cities 
such a cowboy tournament as I witnessed when at 
-Albuquerque, can undoubtedly become the wealthiest 
showman of our time, for it is an entertainment so 
thrilling and exciting that " Buffalo Bill's Wild 
West " and the most daring feats of the circus ring 
sink into utter insignificance in comparison with it. 

♦Jf ♦J* ■•?•■ 

It was a good answer that was once given by a poor 
woman to a minister who asked her, " What is faith? " 
She replied : " I am ignorant ; I cannot answer well, 
but I think it is taking God at his word." 



XHE ingi_e:nook 



THE BANKS' STOCKING ROOM. 



An article in the Tribune of Chicago tells some- 
thing of interest to every Nooker who knows some- 
thing about the method most men have of carrying 
money in their stockings. 

Take the average woman and she naturally puts her 
money where it is not likely to be got at by outsiders. 
The banks recognize this and cater to it by supplying 
rooms for women to take money from their stockings 
and putting it there when drawn out. 

You who might go out to seek a " stocking room 
for women" — where would you go to find it? No 
retail dry goods house in Chicago has such a floor di- 
vision walled in from all other space. No house deal- 
ing as a specialty in lingerie has anything approaching 
it. 

No ; one must go to several Chicago banking houses 
to find the " stocking room " in all that it means to 
women customers of all ages and degrees of wealth ; 
for it was when the banks of Chicago first began to 
seek the patronage of women depositors that many of 
the older institutions awakened to the fact that they 
lacked one of the essentials to be included in the ledger 
account of " furniture and fixtures." 

This was the stocking room. 

Perhaps the ordinary man customer of the ordinary 
bank in Chicago might be disposed to question the ex- 
istence of the bank stocking room and the necessities 
that are forcing these rooms into the architect's designs 
for bank buildings all over the city. But stocking 
rooms they are. by right of derivation from their pur- 
poses. Defined, the term " stocking room " means : 
A place wherein a woman customer of a bank may re- 
tire to draw her money from her stocking for deposit, 
or into which she may retire for the purpose of tuck- 
ing in a roll of money which she may have just drawn 
from the teller's window. 

For, believe it or not, as you will, the woman de- 
positor in the downtown bank almost universally car- 
ries in her stocking the money which she brings for de- 
posit or which she prepares to take away from the 
paying teller's window. And in the experience of 
clerks and tellers in most bank windows and of the 
special officers in the corridors of the institutions where 
no provisions have been made for the stocking trade, a 
woman has a much more embarrassing and difficult 
time in putting a roll of bills from the bank into her 
stocking than she has in abstracting it therefrom for 
deposit. 

" We have no stocking room, but we ought to have,'" 
said an observer in the Bankers' National bank in the 
Marquette building. " If you hadn't mentioned it, 
though, the need of it hasn't occurred to me for a year. 
You see, I have grown so used to see women walking 
up into the corners of the room and asking for permis- 
sion to retire into a little ante-room at one side there. 



or stepping in behind a seat when no men were in 
sight and going right after a roll of bills, that it has 
come to be an everyday commonplace that doesn't at- 
tract my attention any more. 

" From what I know of the woman depositors of 
banks, the stocking in Chicago is the universal place of 
safety for money designed for deposit in bank. Of 
course, no man is ever looking when the woman 
depositor is, but I have learned something bv things 
that I have seen. In the first place, a woman who 
comes into the bank and draws a sum of money to take 
away with her is much more embarrassed at the neces- 
sity of putting it into her stocking than is the woman 
who comes in with her roll under her stocking and 
simply has to take it out. Then, naturally, this em- 
barrassment makes it harder for her to secrete the 
money than it otherwise would be, until sometimes it 
is a serious problem for her with a score of men in 
the bank. 

'■ Taking the depositor, as a rule, however, she does 
not seem to mind any more. A woman, young or old, 
who has come in here half a dozen times with a de- 
posit, will step up into a corner of the room or behind 
a door and in a twinkling she will have her money 
in her hand and move up to the deposit window with 
all the assurance and certainty of a male customer." 

In the Union Trust Company bank in the Tribune 
building the demand for retiring places for women was 
anticipated by the builders, and at the present time the 
women customers of the bank find seclusion and com- 
fort in the reception room designed for them or be- 
hind the railing in another portion of the banking 
room. Behind this railing is an open space supplied 
with desks and writing materials for women, while in 
the retiring room proper are toilet necessities, chairs 
for resting, tables for writing upon, mirrors, and some- 
limes in case of customers even more than the comforts 
of home. 

Women have come to use these rooms on the bank- 
ing floor with a great deal of appreciation. Recogniz- 
ing the stocking as the one safe receptacle for a con- 
siderable amount of money and using the stocking be- 
cause of its safety, anything that tends to retirement 
while she can adjust money to safe keeping naturally 
attracts the timid woman, and after her, even the dames 
who may look to their gray hair as one of the pro- 
tections against a possible Peeping Tom. 

As one of the newer banking buildings the Illinois 
Trust and Savings bank has made elaborate prepara- 
tions to acconmiodate the women customers who carry 
their money tucked away in hosiery. In the basement 
of the building to the south of the main entrance there 
is not only a handsome waiting and retiring room, but 
just off it is a toilet room handsomely equipped and fin- 
ished. The rugs on the floor of the room arc of 
striking pattern and the big mahogany table with 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



chairs clustering around it are an invitation to the' 
women customers to be seated and take their time, 
ihere are mirrors everywhere until it is hard to de- 
termine on which side of the room another suite opens 
out or on which it is only the deception of a big mirror. 

On the main.fioor to the north, in the savings depart- 
ment of the bank, the " stocking room " is a misnomer, 
though a railed space breaks the stretch of floor into 
a nook where women having business with the savings 
department may retire to empty their stockings. 

At the windows of receiving and telling clerks alike, 
women and men take places in line, but this railed por- 
tion attached to the savings department is in the provi- 
dence of women, wholly, and either before or after de- 
posits are made they are at liberty to retire to it and 
remain as long as they like, or they may descend to 
the basement and use the large room set aside for all 
women customers. 

■' For the savings department simply this railed space 
with the seats and tables that are provided seem to 
meet all the demands of the women," said an employe. 
" No men are supposed to hang around that particular 
section of the corridors, and when a woman comes in 
to make a deposit it is necessary only that she enter 
the railed portion, turn her face from the rail, or sit 
down with her back to it, and her money may be 
reached in a moment." 

From the observations of employes in general in 
Chicago banks 90 per cent of the women who come to 
draw or deposit money use the stocking as the place 
of safety. It is not expected of them that any great 
degree of accuracy should be theirs in determining the 
manner and exact place of putting a roll of bills. 

" I should say," said an old special officer in one of 
the old banks, " that the money is tucked under the 
top of the stocking, just at the side of the knee, and 
there pinned fast to it. As far as anything really out 
of the way is concerned, there is nothing in the neces- 
sity of stocking rooms. A woman can walk up into 
any one of half a dozen corners in this room and 
there's not a man in it who could be shocked at the 
spectacle. She lifts her skirt in front with one hand, 
and when she has found the money it is only a second's 
work for her to lean over and release it without most 
men's knowing what she is about." 

The stocking room, however, seems to be one of 
the coming institutions of the average city bank. 
More than ever the banks are considering the business 
of the women and to the extent that this business grows 
in volume and value to the banks there will be special 
efforts to secure it. One of the big banks of Chicago 
has nearly 3,000 depositors who are women, and it re- 
gards this class of customers as among its best. When 
once a woman becomes used to the ways of business 
as a depositor she is quite as reasonable and as easy 
to manasfe as a man customer. 



THE POPE'S SLEEPING CAR. 



Although the pope never travels he owns a sleep- 
ing car, which was constructed in 1868, when the line 
from Rome to Naples was opened. It will be exhibit- 
ed in 1905 to inaugurate the Simplon tunnel. There 
are three compartments — a throneroom, a car for the 
guard of honor and a bedroom. The throneroom is 
richly furnished and has a cupola engraved with the 
papal arms and the twelve apostles. The carriage is 
so arranged that the pope when seated on his throne, is 
plainly visible and can give his benediction to the 
crowds at the stations. The sleeping car is divided in- 




MIDWINTER FLOWERS IN CALIFORNIA. 

to three parts, bed, bath and dressing rooms, which 

are hung with yellow and white, the papal colors. 

The bed is of ebony and ivory. 

'> >> <' 

THE TALMUD ON WINE. 



There is a Talmud parable to this effect. After 
Noah had established his vinej'ard and got on an oc- 
casionl spree he was visited by Satan, who drank with 
him. His Majesty of Hades slew a lamb, a lion, a pig 
and an ape to teach Noah that man, before wine is in 
him, is a lamb ; when he drinks moderately he is a 
lion ; when he drinks like a sot he is a swine ; and any 
excess after reaching that stage makes him an ape that 
senselessly chatters and jabbers. I fail to see where 
man or wine has changed in the four thousand years. 
We have the lamb, lion, pig and ape with us every day. 

4> 4> •!'' 

Try to care about something in this vast world be- 
sides the gratification of small, selfish desires. Look 
on other lives besides your own. See what their 
troubles are and how they are borne. — George Eliot. 
♦ ♦ 4> 

Kindness is a precious oil that makes the crushing 
wheels of care seem lighter. — Eugene Field. 



tme: ingleinook. 



< $ H^ ^ *«^« ^ « 1^1 » * «^ » ^ ^ » t * ^ ^ * *$* * $ *^ 






The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over the country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
takmg the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



4^>4>^H}.^.^^^.4.^j^j,^«j^^.>^»i{H^«j«5M5«5«s«i.^.4M}i^.5^^ 



THE SMALLER FRY. 



In this article we will consider what is doing- among 
all the insects that filled the air last July, and during 
the whole summer in fact. The Nature Study Club 
student might be hard pressed to answer the question 
as to what becomes of all the flies, burnblebees, mos- 
quitoes and the like. These lines are written in the 
Nookman's home at night. The insects that fluttered 
about the light in August are absent. Not a fly buzzes 
on the pane nor does the mosquito dance up and down 
next the ceiling. Where have they gone? What has 
become of them? 

For the most part they are dead. They ran their 
round of existence, fed, fluttered, crept, buzzed, and 
generally lived out their spans of life, and then went 
the way we will all go. They died. Not all of them, 
but most of them are dead. 

It should be remembered that most of the insect 
world live apparently for but one purpose, that of re- 
production of their species. That accomplished, and 
they lead vagrant lives until fate overtakes them. 
Birds by the millions pick them up by the thousands 
of millions. They fight each other as spiders do, 
quarrel among themselves, and suffer from the tiger 
kind of their fellows, such as the hornet's beheading 
flies, either for food or out of pure love of killing. We 
think the world is full of bad people, and surely there 
are enough of them, but if we only knew it, the trag- 
edies of the world of the little and many would be 
appalling. Letting all that go, how about the species 
now ? 

In every home in corners and cracks every woman 
student of the Nature Study clubs has seen a lot of 
flies uncovered in some corner or crevice, not many, 
but enough to populate the place when the season 
opens. The best way to find many of them is to go out 
into the woods, as the easiest place, and finding a rot- 
ten log or a fallen tree, strip up a section of loose bark 
and note carefully what you see. The space between the 
bark and the tree trunk may be swarming with insect 
life in its various forms. No end of eggs and chrys- 
alids of various kinds can be found, and nothing is 
easier than to take a lot of these and hatch them out 
at home. Tliey should be kept separate, and just as 



good a thing as you can get is a pill box in which to 
put the larvje. Cover the top with a small piece of 
glass and put it where it will not be disturbed. The 
greatest trouble is likely to be with humans who will 
likely get into your collection and muss and mix 
things up for you. The earnest naturalist would about 
as soon have a lot of cattle lumbering about his col- 
lection as to have some people pawing over his speci- 
mens. They might mean no harm and ruin every- 
thing. 

Suppose you have a little, brown, half-inch-long 
chrysalid, found under the bark. You don't know 
what it is, and you are interested in knowing. Some 
fine day in April, or some other spring month, you will 
see the little butterfly fluttering under the glass. You 
may even be lucky enough to see it emerging from its 
case. Now is your time to study it well. Note its 
size, its coloring, its special marks and every point 
about it. Study it. Being a naturalist is only seeing 
things. Most people look at a specimen much as an 
idiot looks at a watch, looking but seeing nothing. 
Now here is a wonderful thing to think about. If 
you have gone to the very bottom of one clover head 
or one insect, you know that much about all the count- 
less millions of clover heads and insects of that kind 
all over the whole world. You know them as vou 
never can know people. Men and women have their 
ways, each different from the other, and widely differ- 
ent among the races. But the clover and the bum- 
blebee are one and the same everywhere and know- 
ing one means knowing all. 

There is one thing more helpful than all others in 
the study of nature and living things, or inanimate 
ones for that matter. Write it in big letters for it 
means much. Start a collection. You will not go 
very far till you learn one fact severely. You will 
never live long enough to gather in all things. Then 
you will begin to specialize and take to fossils, butter- 
flies, shells, or one of the hundreds of departments of 
human knowledge. Then specialization goes still far- 
ther, and when you come to die you may know the 
life history of one thing. Mark you I say " may," 
for it is doubtful if any man ever lived who knew any 
one thing to the very end in all its phases. Still one 
may become the greatest living authority on some one 
thing, and that is worth while. 



the: inguenook. 



THE UNDER WORLD. 



(Ine would imagine that in the dead of winter, such 
as we are having now, where there is snow five or six 
inches in depth all over the countrv, there would be no 
life under its surface, but the facts are that in every 
field and in every hedgerow, and especially in the neg- 
lected pasture fields, there is a great deal of the smaller 
animal life. The field mice are not hibernating and 
are alive all over and are moving about almost con- 
tinually. 

■ In the autumn, before the cold winter has set in, the 
mice have made up their runways, which a great many 
boys have doubtless noticed. When the snow falls 
upon them there, in the translucent light, they travel 
from place to place,- making visits and living just about 
the same lives they have always lived with the excep- 
tion that they are not visible to the eye of man. It 
does not naturally follow that because the snow is over 
them they are invisible to the eye of the hawk sailing 
overhead. In passing through one of the runways of 
the animal, the mouse may crowd against a weed or 
spear of grass and this to the hawk overhead, with his 
telescopic eye, is noticed immediately. Folding his 
wings he makes a dash for the spot, and, when he 
reaches it, folds them over his back and makes a grab 
through the snow to get the luckless animal if his 
aim be a good one. 

How the sense of the hawk is so developed as to 
notice the infinitesimal variation of the weed is not 
known. It may even hear the noise made by the 
mouse in his travels. At all events, that is what the 
hawk is doing, among other things, when sailing in 
circles overhead. Nothing escapes his eye on the sur- 
face underneath. The mouse instinctively understands 
to keep down and out of sight as much as possible. 
Occasionally some bold mouse bores up to the top, 
and a pair of very bright eyes appear on the sur- 
face. It comes out and travels on the surface of the 
snow for a time and goes back again. If it escapes the 
eye of the hawk, or, if at night, that of the owl which 
is iust as much to be dreaded, it is a case of its superior 
agility and the chances of its getting out of sight as 
quickly as possible. 

It is sometimes the case that the meadow is frozen 
over at high water, leaving a thin skin of ice over the 
top, and the waters then receding leave a few inches 
between its surface and the ground underneath. Un- 
der this is the playground of the mouse in winter time, 
and it is often the case that the hawk overhead dashes 
down and tries to follow them in their running way, 
but is unable to get at them by reason of the protec- 
tion the thin sheet of ice affords. 

During the Avinter time the mouse spends much of its 
time in a neatly-constructed nest, which all countrv 
boys have seen but they have perhaps not examined it 
with the care that the skill in its architecture would 



warrant. Outside the grass that goes to make up the 
little nest is very coarse, while the farther in and the 
nearer the center the finer it gets. The little apart- 
ment within where the little mouse coils up and rests 
to keep warm is a model of housebuilding and is suf- 
ficiently warm to make it comfortable for the furry 
little animal. 

•I' i' •^ 

CRIMINAL INSECTS. 



In France the Phylloxcrs, tiny insects with luxurious 
tastes, cost the vineyard owners $660,000,000 a few 
years ago, that being the value of the royal feast they 
had enjoyed. 

Perhaps, however, the worst and most dreaded crim- 
inal of them all is the locust. He gathers in swarms 
not of thousands, but millions, and where the hordes go 
darkness gathers over the land, for the light of day is 
shut out by them. When they have laid a district 
under contribution not a blade of vegetation remains ■ 
upon it. 

Comfort, however, may be obtained in the fact that 
the criminal locust himself is fried and roasted in some 
countries, and, no doubt, many a peasant who has 
suffered from a locust visit enjoys these means with 
an enhanced gusto. 

The extent, however, of the locust plague may be 
seen by the fact that in Cyprus peasants are paid $200 
for every ton of locust eggs they destroy. In some 
years as many of sixty tons are destroyed, which means 
that some 680,000,000 of locusts have been cheated of 
their chance of existence. But still they come, and 
recently the locust swarms were as active as ever. 

Another criminal insect is the Cephidce, or stem saw- 
,fly. The females of this class of insect first bores. her 
way into the stems of young wheat, and there de- 
posits her eggs. The larva, finding itself in pleasant 
surroundings, very soon quickens into life and to 
gorge itself. Of course, that means that this stem of 
wheat is ruined. In sunny Japan, a few years back, 
the stem sawfly ruined crops to the value of $75,000,- 
000. — Stray Stories. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Sometimes a growing plant will start a branch 
that is wholly unlike the parent plant. For instance, 
a geranium, the leaves of which are naturally green 
may send out a shoot with white or mottled leaves. If 
this shoot is allowed to flower and then to go to seed, 
the seed, will, in all probability, produce the same kind 
of plant as the original, from which the shoot 
started. But if the shoot is broken off and rooted it 
will reproduce its own kind right along, but if this 
new plant is allowed to flower and seed, the seeds are 
very apt to revert to the original kind. The shoot is 
called a sport and often happens, and if worth while 
is readily perpetuated. 



THE INGLENOOK. 



QUAIL. 

The quail belongs to the same family as the grouse 
and the pheasant, and if you had a prairie hen from 
Illinois, a pheasant from Pennsylvania, a partridge 
from Ohio, and the quail from the Pacific coast we 
would say that they all belong to the same family. 
They look alike, act very much alike, really are alike 
to a very large extent. The scientific name is Colinns 
virgianius and it is found in the eastern part of the 
United States from southern Maine down to the 
Gulf, west to the Dakotas and down to Texas. 

It should be remembered that it is the Colinus z'ir- 
gianius that is referred to and not the CaUipcpla cal- 
ifornica, which is a different species entirely. Our 
quail, or partridge as it is known in many places, pre- 
fers the open fields and meadows, and is most plenti- 
ful in the great agricultural regions. They lay their 
eggs on the ground in a nest that very much resembles 
a hen's nest in the small. The eggs are white, pear- 
shaped, and vary in number but about fifteen would 
be regarded as a good setting. 

A peculiarity of the partridge is that it can be readily 
bred in confinement. A good many birds cannot be 
bred when confined but the partridge or quail will 
breed though they rarely become very tame. The 
writer of these lines once fed a flock of quails through 
the winter at his home in Pennsylvania, and they lived 
about the barn and with the poultry. They flew away 
a short distance at night to sleep on the ground in a 
ring with their bodies close together and their heads 
pointing outward, the idea apparently being not to 
be taken by surprise by the approach of a fox or 
predatory animal. 

The place to find quail is along the deserted hedge- 
row- where they can run in and out through the weeds 
and protect themselves when tluy are not out in the 
fields feeding. If one should happen to find a nest 
of quails' eggs and has access to an incubator, the}- can 
readily be hatched out, and will as promptly die appar- 
ently for lack of food adapted to their wants. 

The question is often sprung whether or not the 
quail can withhold its characteristic scent. A bird 
dog going over a field runs across a covey of quail 
and immediately stiffens himself up into an iron dog 
until the orders come to flush the covey, but it has 
been noticed at times that a bird dog will run right 
into a covey that has seen him coming or has run 
right over a solitary bird that knows he is there and 
which the dog apparently does not notice. Some nat- 
uralists think the quail is capable of withholding its 
scent by pressing its feathers against its body, others 
laugh at the idea. 

The clear, piping note of the partridge calling its 
flock together is familiar to the ears of every reader 
who has ever lived in the country. It may be that 
it is a love song, but it is a fact that if a covey is 



once flushed, and the birds scattered in every di- 
rection they call to each other until they are gathered 
up again. 

To the human who has killing in his heart there is 
no better so-called sport than going after a covey of 
partridges with a good dog and gun. But, consider- 
ing the fact that partridges are perfectly harmless, so 
far as any ill effects on the crops or the like is con- 
cerned, it seems a pity to mangle them with a shot- 
gun for the sake of eating them. 

The long, hard winters are responsible for the loss 
of many thousands of quail. Their worst enemies 
are the fo.x, owls, hawks, and on the approach of a 
hawk the covey of quail will plunge headlong into a 
thicket where the pirate of the air cannot get at them. 
The writer has more than once seen a huge hawk 
perched on a fence post while it was certain that the 
partridges were underneath watching him. If ever 
one is fortunate enough to tumble over the hawk by a 
long range rifle shot, as he drops down on the ground 
the quail will fly in every direction. 

* * * 
THE GREEN HERON. 



The green heron is known in science as Ardea vire- 
sccns. It will be recognized by every reader by the 
commoner name of fly-up-the-creek. It has a variety 
of local names but will be known to the Inglenook 
readers by the term fly-up-the-creek. It is found 
from Canada and Oregon southward to South Ameri- 
ca and the West Indies. It is reared in the middle part 
of the United States for the reason that, being a fish- 
er, it keeps away from the dry country. 

It arrives in the middle United States along about 
the first week of April and remains until earlv winter. 
The green heron sometimes nests in companies of two 
or three, having their nests close together. The 
nests are made of sticks, etc., and are placed in bushes 
or small trees near streams and ponds. They lay five 
or six eggs of a pale blue color. These eggs are 
somewhat larger than a common pigeon egg. 

The heron is a great fisher. It is rather a wild 
bird at best. He is a handsome fellow perched on a 
limb. When alarmed he stretches out his long legs 
and starts up the creek. He lives on fish, water bee- 
tles, frogs, minnows, but will not hesitate to take in- 
sects such as grasshoppers, and he is particularly hard 
on the larvae of water insects. The heron can be 
seen in his native habitat wading in shallow water 
transfixing a frog and now and then bolting a minnow. 

It would be difficult to domesticate one of these 
herons unless in the vicinity of a pond or stream where 
there are ample fish readily caught. Take it all 
around the green heron may be regarded as a harmless 
bird unless in fhe vicinity of some jiond or place where 
Sfoldfish are being- reared. 



-the: ingl_e:nook 



THE KILDEER. 



Where is the boy or girl who does not kiiow the 
kildeer? His name in science is Aegialitis vocifcra. 
While it is one. of the commonest birds ranging all over 
temperate North America, very few people have ever 
found its nest. The nest is usually in a slight hole in 
the ground and very often near a hill of corn. Its 
spotted eggs are pyriform, there being about four of 
them. They are small at one end and quite pointed. 
The kildeer lives on earthworms, grasshoppers and in- 
sects generally. He may often be seen in piles of mud 
in search of food or running around over the fields 
catching insects. And it is a very common thing for 
one who has been plowing to notice the kildeers fol- 
lowing the furrow after the worms that have been 
turned up. 

Sometimes after a storm they may be seen patting 
the ground with their feet in order to frighten the 
worms underneath which come forth only to be seized 
and hauled out bodily. 

A peculiarity of the kildeer is that it seems to be 
hung on its legs in such a manner as to be in a con- 
dition of unstable equilibrium. Nobody knows why 
it keeps up its everlasting bobbing up and down except 
the bird itself, and it is not telling. 

The writer remembers of hunting a family of young 
kildeers that had not learned to fly very much. The 
old one was very much worried about her young and 
got out into the water as a duck would ordinarily do. 
The little ones followed, so did the man. The water 
was about three feet deep, as clear as crystal, and 
the old bird was seen to collapse, and go to the bot- 
tom like a stone. The young ones followed and they 
could clearly be seen running along on the clear sand 
of the bottom, and going faster than the man who 
walked along. Presently they arose to the surface and 
made their way to a hiding place. 

The kildeer is a bird that does no harm whatever to 
anybody and should not be killed on any mistaken no- 
tion that it is in any way undesirable. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE PORCUPINE. 



Jusr at this season of the year the porcupine, in 
certain parts of the country, is doing a good deal of 
mischief in the forest by stripping off the bark of the 
trees that would make good lumber if left alone, for 
a while. 

Porkey is built on the fat and heavy plan and out 
of all proportion to his height. He ambles along on 
the ground looking very much like an over-grown 
chestnut burr, with his yellow and black stickers. 
He has feet like a raccoon. His weapons of offense 
and defense are the long, sharp quills with which he 



is covered from head to tail. He does not throw these 
quills as is sometimes thought, but brushes up against 
his enemy, leaving a dozen or more of these stickers in 
his hide. When hard-pressed he will curl up like a 
ball and then he is practically safe. 

His food is almost entirely vegetable, consisting of 
the bark of trees and tender roots and twigs, although 
they will eat insects and other things found under the 
bark. He has long, sharp teeth and powerful jaws 
with which he strips the bark from a tree as a man 
would with a steel instrument. 

In some places they are so numerous that trappers 
have been hired to clean them out. He is easily caught 
in a trap and hunters do not regard a day's work as 
rounded out unless they kill at least thirty of them. 

It may be interesting to our class to know that the 
quills of the porcupine, when the animal is born, are 
soft and flexible. Will the Nook family be kind 
enough to advise the editor whether or not there are 
any porcupines within the range of their home sur- 
roundings. The idea is to establish its habitat. 

^* ^ ^ 

THE BUMBLEBEE. 



There are a good many thousands of bumblebees 
at this writing all over the country. They are hiding 
somewhere, possibly under the snow or in some out-of- 
the-wa)' place, where they are protected from the cold. 
These bitmblebees are all queens. 

When the first warm days of spring come they will 
emerge from their hiding places and begin to nest. 
They will select some hollow place in the sod or per- 
haps take some abandoned mouse nest, and therein 
deposit a mass of pollen, lay the eggs in it precisely 
as the other bees do during the season, and quite a nest 
full of bees will result. 

If our Nature Study people will notice the first bees 
that come around in springtime, they will see that 
there are magnificent specimens, much larger than the 
ordinary bumblebee. These are the queens and they 
come about the time the lilac is in bloom. They are 
the workers at the time, because they are the only ones 
in the nest. A little later on they retire, and the others 
do the work as is the case with other bees. When cold 
"weather comes, the rest of the bees all perish, but the 
queens survive. This will answer the question as to 
what becomes of the bumblebees in winter. They have 
all died except the queens, who start nests in the new 
each spring. 

♦ ♦ ^ 

The new fossiled tgg is said to have come from Ari- 
zona. There can be no mistake about the nature of 
the curiosity, as an expert examination has revealed 
the fact that the delicate shell has been perfectly pre- 
served, even to the fine pitting of the outside. 



lO 



the: inglenook, 



n 



mllCL-EKnOKL 

A Weekly IVEagfazine 

...PUBLISHED BY... 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions arc carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 

Brethren Publishing House, 
(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South Sute St.. ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 

One by one thy duties wait thee. 

Let thy whole heart go to each. 
Let no future dream elate thee, 

Learn thou first what these can teach. 

— .Adelaide .'\. Proctor. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE JAPS. 



Little Japan swollen with pride stands before giant 
Russia with a chip on its shoulder. Both of them are 
cautious because neither of them know the outcome 
of a fight. 

The trouble seems to be that through the agency of 
Russia most of what was gained by Japan's defeating 
China has been nullified by the action of the Czar, and, 
if there is a fight between Japan and Russia, the con- 
tention will be about which country shall exercise do- 
minion over China. 

It is altogether likely that Japan will become one of 
the world powers before many years in almost every 
respect, and its national life is a marvel, having no 
parallel in the world's history. Within the present 
lifetime the Mikado was looked upon as a brother of 
the sun and as sacred in his person and authority. He' 
was not to be seen by human eyes and was treated 
with the deference due a god. At the present day he 
goes about like other people, wearing a swallow- 
tail coat while his wife appears in European costumes. 

The whole country woke up intellectually, and these 
little brown people will, beyond all question, make 
themselves felt in the future history of the world. 
Japan expects to utilize China as a field for immigra- 
tion. Her home territory is so crowded that there 
must be an outlet for her population and she expects 



to spread out in dift'erent parts of the country and make 
homes for them. 

Russia, with her policy of national extension, stands 
in the way and no man can foretell the outcome. If 
China and Japan make an alliance, offensive and de- 
fensive, with the intelligence that Japan can bring into 
the pact, and the numbers that China can supply, no- 
body living can foretell what the result might be. It is 
a good thing that the United States stands well with 
all the parties concerned, and there is not much like- 
lihood of our country being drawn into the quarrel. 
.;. .J, .'. 
A FRESH AIR IDEA. 



A GREAT many people have weak lungs, to put it 
in a plain, unvarnished way, have consumption and will 
die of it sooner or later. Then, again, there are others 
who are troubled in a nervous way, and there are still 
other diseases that make life miserable, and a cure 
for which is to be most earnestly desired. 

The Inglenook suggests the out-door plan as the 
thing that comes the nearest to a cure for all such 
troubles, and what is meant by outdoor life is not only 
going into the open at stated periods, but to live there 
the whole year around. A person who will start liv- 
ing outdoors and sleeping in a tent, as near the ground 
as possible, will find that his physical troubles will 
gradually abate and that he will begin to get well and 
strong. Of course, if he has some mortal disease 
which is necessarily fatal, nothing will save him, but 
he who is weak, and will live the life of a soldier in 
the open air, is almost certain to grow strong. 

The writer noticed all over certain parts of Califor- 
nia, and especially in the desert regions adjoining that 
State, where people have applied the idea practically 
and have put up tents, some of them right out on the 
desert out of the sight of human habitations. Thev 
found it profitable along health lines, or they would not 
have done it, and there can be no doubt that this prac- 
tice in any part of the country will be beneficial to a 
large degree, if not entirely so. 

It is actually meant by this that if a man were to go 
into the fields or in his backyard and put up a tent, 
eat and sleep there, he would be better physically than 
if he ate and slept in the house. It is not meant bv 
this to recommend to anybody that they go cold and 
hungry. On the contrary sufficient clothes, and warm 
and sufficient bedding should be employed to make 
one comfortable. There are people who have tried this 
plan and found it an eminent success, and after having 
lived a while out in the open or in a tent, go back to 
the house and sleep in a room with manifest regret. 

There are people who will say that this spells sick- 
ness and death. On the contrary there are people, 
who, at this very writing, are living in tents in the far 
west preparatory to building or locating there, and 



HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



II 



when these people have begun this in summer time they 
continue it in colder weather, and the result is that 
their children are as hard as pine knots, and the 
parents as well have better health, and they are all 
better fitted for life when they come to live under 

roof. 

* <J* 4* 

YOUTHFUL CRIME. 



A FEW months ago several cold-blooded' murders 
were committed in Chicago by people, then unknown. 
The street car authorities had a barn at the terminal 
of the road and late at night the receipts of the day 
were counted in the office and locked up in the safe. 
About two o'clock in the morning several men ap- 
peared and at once shot the parties within, killing all 
except one, broke in, seized the money, and made ofif 
with it. The whole city was horrified and every effort 
was made to detect the criminals. Recently one of 
them was caught and he gave awa}' the others, and 
finally after a few more murders the whole lot of them 
was lodged in jail. 

They are all young men, and, by their confession, 
were started on a career of crime by reading so-called 
vellow literature. There is no stronger lesson against 
this sort of publications than in the perversion of these 
young men. They constitute but a single instance out 
of the many of which we never hear, and the num- 
bev of vouiig boys and girls that have been started on 
the road to ruin by reading such sensational stuff' is 
beyond all computation. A man has only to go into 
a large book store that caters to such a trade to be 
astonished at the lot of cheaper books of this sort that 
are made for just such people. It is a sad commen- 
tary on the intelligence and morality of any community 
that there is a call for the sale of such, but the facts 
are that more of it is sold by a long ways than of 
books and papers containing real information. 

The moral of the whole business is that those in 
charge of the reading matter of their children should 
see to it that they are furnished with that which is good 
for them, and in sufficient quantities to satisfy every 
appetite for reading. It is most unfortunate that 
there should be a famih"^ of boys and girls anywhere, 
who should be neglected by their parents and allowed 
to take to the pernicious literature with which the 
country is flooded. 

* ♦ ♦ 
THE QUACK. 



There is no department in human life that c[uite 
equals the domain of medicine for sheer quackery. 
Let it be understood that there are certain remedies 
well-known and used successfully throughout several 
lifetimes. The science of medicine, especially in sur- 
gery, is wonderful in achievement. To these standard 
remedies and successful practitioners, we make no ref- 



erence in this article. We refer to the charlatans that 
hang on the public as so many human ticks. 

Let a man advertise in the papers that he will heal 
all diseases with some secret nostrum, or that he will 
heal by merely telling you there is nothing the mat- 
ter with you, and the mails are heavy with responses 
and tens of thousands of dollars set their tide toward 
the advertisers. 

The people who send their money to these advertisers 
get fleeced nine times out of ten. If the inside workings 
of some of these absent treatment people were known 
none would be fool enough to trust them. Then, there 
is this one thing to remember, — not one of these adver- 
tising quacks can possibly know more than the regular 
practitioner. What other books can the advertiser 
read, or what means of knowledge have they that the 
regular doctors do not have? What are their secret 
means of knowledge? None at all outside of their 
profession of them. In the very nature of things it 
cannot be. 

People, who are sick, and we all will be sooner or 
later if we are not now, seem willing to grasp at straws. 
It is a blind hope against all common sense, to think 
that the farther awa}' from home the better the chance. 
So the Indian, the Chinese, and the fool doctors gen- 
erally, reap a harvest from the woes and miseries of 
the afflicted. Correct living, remedies well-known, the 
family doctor, and a trust in God will bring you around 
if so it is to be. 

4^ ^t -t^ 

A jtJSTiCE of the peace, who is nearly one hundred 
years old, and who is now in active service at Polo, 
111., discourages marriage business being brought to his 
court. He says that none but a minister of the Gospel 
should be empowered to say the sacred words that 
bind two hearts together. In the light of his char- 
acter and long experience his words have a golden val- 
ue. His advice is that not only a divine blessing be 
invoked, but that some kindly interest be shown, some 
words of advice given that will start a couple on the 
right path and keep them there. 



The attention of subscribers is again called to the 
fact that they should not allow their subscription to 
lapse. Either send in the money, or write concerning 
the matter, that there be no breaks in the receipt of 
the magazine. One good reason for being thus 
thoughtful about this matter is that, as a rule, we can 
furnish no back numbers. Once the issue of the week 
is printed, the extra numbers, if there are any, are 
immediately disposed of and not allowed to accumulate. 

Subscribe at once if you have not alreadv done so. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Active participation in the duties of this world 
seems to be the surest safeguard for the health of body 
and mind. — Lydia Maria Child. 



12 



THE INGUEINOOK. 



WHAT'S THE NEWS? 



In 1903 there were 154,808 railway cars built. 
The riddle, " How old is Ann ? " has invaded Japan. 



Pneumonia deaths numbered 139 in Chicago in a 
single week. 

Reports of Christmas tree fires are beginning to 
be published in the papers. 

In case of a war between Japan and Russia Great 
Britain is bound to help Japan. 

Great Britain has two envoys at Pekin ; the Eng- 
lish minister assisted by Dr. Morrison of the Times. 

Bennet Burleigh, at Tokio, Japan, declares that 
Russia is apparently seeking to provoke a war with 
Japan. 

The decision in regard the Dreyfus matter in France 
is near at hand. It is supposed to be favorable to 
Dreyfus. 

The superintendent of the Chicago city schools ad- 
vocates increased salaries to attract men teachers back 
to the work. 

The Alton railroad is reported to have been sold 
•or will be sold soon. It is said that the Union Pacific 
may buy it. 

Pneumonia has killed many people in New York. 
The scourge carried off 272 victims in one week. It is 
said to be infectious. 

The World's Fair stamps are bearing the portraits 
of the presidents and the men connected with the 
Louisiana Purchase. 

Russia and Japan are placing large orders for beef 
with the Chicago packers. The destination of the sup- 
plies is kept a secret. 

Dr. Henry Marsh Warren, of New York, said that 
one of the wants of the times is a Bible in ever\' 
guest room at the hotels. 



Within the last few days the Minneapolis flour mills 
have booked almost one hundred thousand barrels of 
flour for export to Japan. 



One of Chicago's aldermen has been sentenced to a 
vear in prison. He was at the head of a gang that 
bought votes for fifty cents apiece. 



The cabinet of the United States declares that the 
republic of Panama is a fact and the government at 
Bogota, Colombia, will be so notified. 



^ 



For the first time in ten years Christmas found the 
world without a war. This is one of the things to 
be devoutlv grateful for. 



The Pennsylvania Limited crashed into an east- 
bound freight train ten miles east of Warsaw, Ind., 
killing three persons and injuring nine. 



The United States cruiser Olynipia has visited a 
("olombian port. Official visits were exchanged and 
much courtesy was observed on either side. . 



On Dec. 24 eight working plants at Pullman and 
Deering closed for a week. This threw fourteen thou- 
sand men out of work. The feeling is uncertain. 



The car barn bandits, who did so much killing, and 
whose cases are now in court, are asking for postpone- 
ment of their trial, saying that public sentiment is 
against them. 



The Mormon church has officially taken sides in the 
coal strikes in Carbon county, Utah. It has openly 
arrayed itself in favor of the Utah Fuel Co., against 
organized labor. 

Noah Reby, one hundred and thirty-one years old, 
an inmate of the township poor-house, in New Jersey, 
has regained his sight after having been blind for 
twenty-two years, 

Prince Oiing, the minister who controls China's, 
foreign relations, is a much weaker character than the 
empress and is ill fitted for the strenuous diplomatic 
life of the empire. 

The president instructs the State Department to 
keep a close watch on the affairs of Kishenev, where 
the Jewish people have been having trouble with the 
Russian government. 



It is not likely that any bonds will be issued in pay 
for the Panama canal. The treasury is in such a con- 
dition that it can pay out $20,000,000 without creating 
a financial disturbance. 



Some time ago a mob attacked a consul in Turkey 
and now the United States will demand apology and 
reparation. The Sultan must understand that the stars 
and stripes must be protected. 



Lord Strathcona, of Canada, the Canadian High 
Commissioner, states that his countrv is not after 
Greenland, and that its purchase from Denmark is not 
within the range of practical politics. 



At Dayton, Ohio, twelve girls leaped from the fifth 
story window of the Canby building, landing on the 
roof and skylight of another building a story below. 
The jump was made to escape death by fire and suf- 
focation. 



the: inglenook. 



13 



A sensation was created in Philadelphia at a meet- 
ing of the Scientific Society by die statement that where 
the X-rays had been tried on negroes the skin had 
turned white and continues to remain so. 



Mr. L. F. Loree, former president of the B. &. O. is 
elected to the same position witli the Rock Island. Os- 
car G. ]\'Iun-ay, first vice-president of the B. & O., was 
elected president of that road to succeed Loree. 



There is an uneasy spirit abroad in Japan, calling for 
war with Russia. The authorities may not be able to 
stand up against the popular demand and there may be 
a fight between the pigmy and the giant before it is all 
over. 



The ministers of Chicago are considering the chance 
of converting people after the age of twenty-three. 
They seem to think there is little chance, with older 
people, of getting them into the church. Clearly they 
are in error. 



The conditions between Japan and Russia are such 
that hostilities may break out any day. China may 
combine with Japan, and England will back Japan. 
The war will not likely be a long one, if, indeed, it 
happens at all. 

There is serious talk of an effort to raise the level 
of the great lakes so that Chicago river will be backed 
up to avoid lowering the tunnels that pass under it. 
These tunnels prevent big ships from passing up and 
down the river. 



Hearst, the proprietor of papers in San Francisco, 
Chicago, and New York, has established one in Los 
Angeles. It will favor trade unions. The present 
leading paper in Los Angeles has had much trouble 
fighting unions. 

Miss Minnie Cook, an accomplished musician, of 
Nevrport, is said to be about to bring action for 
breach of promise against Wm. Olmer Leavitt, the 
artist who recently married Ruth Bryan, daughter of 
W. Jennings Bryan. 

Calvin Snyder, of Clyde, New York, aged seventy- 
two, has growing on his body over fifty bone-like pro- 
tuberances from the size of a walnut to as big as two 
fists. He has no pain and the doctors don't know 
what causes the bumps. 



Among the fourteen hundred steerage passengers on 
the Hamburg-American liner, Blucher, there was a 
panic at sea, in which they acted as beasts. The fright 
lasted for twelve hours and the officers stood with 
drawn revolvers to keep the crowd in its place. The 
fright was supreme and the passengers thought the 
ship was sinking. 



A United States cruiser, oflf the coast of Panama, 
has found that a number of Colombian troops are on 
the way to Panama. In case of any armed invasion of 
the new republic, this country will be required to stand 
by it and help Panama. 

In one of the columns of the daily papers we find the 
statement that there is no danger of war in the East 
and that everything is settled satisfactorily. In an- 
other we see it stated that all signs point to a con- 
flict. Take your choice. 

Andrew Carnegie, in a recent address, said that in 
case of a war between this country and England, all 
that would be necessary to end it would be the stop- 
ping of cotton going out to England. The spindles 
would stop and the unemployed would force peace. 

Twenty-two lives were lost last week on the Pere 
Marquette road when a train from Detroit and a train 
from Grand Rapids crashed together at East Paris. 
The wind blew the light out at the stopping point and 
the passenger went by without stopping, smashing 
into the other train. 



The first public church wedding ever held in Zion 
City took place last Christmas, Dr. Dowie himself be- 
ing the minister. He did not kiss the bride as kiss- 
ing is forbidden in Zion. A part of the ceremony, ac- 
cording to the papers, was asking whether or not the 
bride and bridegroom believed that he was Elijah and 
that they would obey him as such. They affirmed 
that they believed and would obey. 



On Dec. 23, at Laurel Run, a mile from Dawson, 
Pa., on the Baltimore & Ohio main line, a train was de- 
railed by timbers dropping from a freight train which 
preceded it. Sixty-three persons were killed and 
scores injured. The passenger train was making up 
lost time and was going at the rate of sixty miles an 
hour. The cars caught fire and scores of persons 
were injured in the smash and fire that followed. 
Identification of the dead is difficult because of the 
way they are cut up and burned. 

One of the worst fire horrors that ever happened in 
Chicago was that of the burning of the Iroquois thea- 
ter on the afternoon of Dec. 30. Between five and 
six hundred people were burned to death, and a large 
number of others were more or less injured. The 
house was an entirely new one and the audience num- 
bered over eighteen hundred, mostly women and chil- 
dren. When the cry of fire arose the crowd within 
stampeded, blocked the exits and were either tram- 
pled to death or smothered by the smoke or burned 
to death. At this writing the full extent of the horror 
is not known. Several Nookers were in the theater 
at the time of the disaster and escaped with slight 
injuries. 



14 



the: ingl-enook. 



HOW STEEL IS MADE. 



If a Nooker were to visit a furnace where they 
were manufacturing steel he would probably not un- 
derstand what he saw nor is it likely that he would 
find many people around the works who would be able 
to tell him much about it. Suppose we try getting at 
the principle of the matter, and it will not be so dif- 
ficult to either describe or understand. 

The difference between common iron and steel lies 
in the fact of the proportion of tlie carbon in the steel. 
In the first place the iron is emptied into what is called 
a converter. It is a huge, barrel-shaped, wrought 
iron vessel lined with refractory materials, and hung 
on a trunion, one of which serves to convey an air blast 
to the bottom of the converter. 

-Vt the bottom of this converter there are about 
twenty air tuyeres, each of which is perforated by a 
number of half-inch holes. The blast of air is set 
going from the blowing engine while the converter 
is in a horizontal position. A large amount of melted 
iron is now poured in. The converter is swung to its 
vertical position and the air is forced upwards through 
the metal from the bottom through from 150 to 200 
separate openings. As the air rushes up through 
this molten mass, its oxygen combines with the car- 
bon, silicon, and manganese, and the violent combustion 
this sets up raises the temperature of the metal to 
what is known as a boil. It takes eight or ten min- 
utes to burn out all the carbon in the charge and only 
the pure iron remains. 

Those who have passed an iron works at night and 
have seen the wonderful shower of sparks thrown 
upward, will now know what is going on there. It is 
tne blowing of these streams of air through the molten 
metal in the converter, the whole flying out of the top 
in a thick rain of fire. 

When the carbon is all burned out and only the 
pure iron remains, the contents are run out into a big 
fifteen-ton ladle. At the same time there is run into 
the ladle a certain amount of melted spiegeleisen. This 
speigeleisen is very rich in carbon and manganese and 
supplies the requisite amount of carbon to make the 
kind of steel they are working. In short the im- 
purities are all burned out, the carbon and everything 
else from the original amount of iron, and then the 
proper amount of carbon is mixed in afterward to 
make the different kinds of steel. 
♦ ■5. ^ 
NEGRO AFRAID OF CAMERA. 



" It is a curious thing, but a negro is as afraid of a 
camera as he is of a gun," said a man who pays some 
attention to the peculiarities of the black race, " and I 
have often wondered just why it was. On a number 
of occasions I have tried to get good, striking pictures 



and poses of the negro, but if the black man got a 
view of the camera and vmderstood that I was about 
10 take his likeness he would immediately scamper 
away to some hiding place where he would be beyond 
the range of the camera. A short while ago I made a 
trip up the river on a steamboat and at various places 
along the river tried to get characteristic sketches of 
the negro. In some. instances I succeeded, but it was 
whtn the group knew nothing about what I was doing. 

" Whenever they got on to my racket they would 
make a break and if I got to see them at all it was when 
they peeped from behind the trees on the river bank. 
I have made the same experiment under different cir- 
cumstances and on all occasions it has simply been a 
question of the negro finding out what I was after. 
He will scuttle as soon as he learns that the camera 
is leveled on him. Why is this? Is it because the 
negro does not understand the principles of photo- 
graphy? Is it because the whole thing is wrapped up 
in a mystery so far as he is concerned ? Maybe so. 
But I am, inclined to think there is another and more 
reasonable explanation of the cm"ious fact. 

" The negro is naturally a suspicious member. He 
cannot understand that you are taking his picture for 
art's sake. He knows nothing of art and cares less 
about it. When you level the camera on him he docs 
not know what you are up to and, becoming frightened, 
runs away. I think the negro's fear of the camera 
is due altogether to his suspicious nature. But what- 
ever the cause, he is afraid of it, and if vou don't be- 
lieve it try to take his picture in this way some time." 
— Nezv Orleans Times-Dciuocrat. 



HEATING COLD 



APARTMENTS. 



Sometimes when a large room such as a good-sized 
church is heated, the congregation finds that it is un- 
comfortably cold. The party in charge savs that he 
made fire the day before, and did all he could to make 
it comfortable, all of which may be true enough, but 
this fact in a Nature Study way should not be over- 
looked. 

It is much the same as firing up an engine. Every 
part of it related to the steam production must be 
raised to the boiling point before any steam will be 
generated. In the case of the room being heated, the 
walls, ceiling, floors, benches, seats, etc., must all be 
heated up before any change is felt in the air. Al- 
though the fire may have been started in good time, 
and properly kept up, naturally a longer time must 
elapse in very cold weather for the room to be com- 
fortable. Very often the janitor is blamed for a re- 
sult with which he has nothing to do. 



* * 



We are in the age of scientific prevention. 
llollington. 



-R. D. 



the: ingleinook. 



SALMON AS FOOD. 



Suiu; one interested in the salmon business has fig- 
ured out to a fraction the relative value of salmon as 
food compared with other foods. 

Within the entire range of preserved food, this au- 
thority says, it would be difficult to name an article of 
greater dietary value and cheaper than canned salmon, 
with the exception of milk. It is one of the .wonder- 
ful facts of our time that through modern inventions 
and appliances one pound of the richest fish that swims 
may be had at a cost to the consumer from one-half 
to two-thirds the cost of the same quantity of fresh 
salmon. 

Canned salmon contains as much protein as lamb 



pound of beef at fourteen cents W')uld make the pro- 
tein cost seventy-seven cents per pound ; codfish steaks 
at twelve cents means protein at seventy-one cents ; loin 
of pork at twelve cents yields protein at eighty-five cents 
per pound. Food must also furnish energy for heat and 
muscular work, and here we find that the cost of en- 
ergy per i,ooo calories, when canned salmon is eaten, 
is one-third the cost of codfish steaks when eaten ; one- 
half when sirloin of beef is used ; the same cost as 
ham ; nearly ten times cheaper than lobster or ovsters. 

The above indicates why salmon is such a favorite 
article of food with wage earners. When eaten with 
bread or potatoes, a diet is obtained which will supply 
all the demands of the body. 

During the past two seasons 9,368,131 cases of forty- 



a^V'nf :*^t5.\'i^J^' t^^ 



^<;^i: 






-*^- ' • ' 




M 



.\X OKL.AHOMA HOME. 



chops or beefsteak ; sixty per cent more than eggs ; 
more fat than chicken, eggs or beef. Its calculated 
heat of combustion per gram is much greater than beef 
or eggs. It is incomparably of greater food value 
than fruits or vegetables. Its fuel (food) value is 
greater than mackerel ; three times greater than dried 
cod : little more than sardines ; four times more 
tlT'.n oysters : three times more than canned 
lobsti.r; nearly three times more than shrimp; 
five times greater than frogs' legs. There is 
a very small percentage of waste in canned salmon, 
as compared with fresh fish. Lobsters, oysters, shrimp, 
turtle are in favor because of their delicate flavor rath- 
er than food value. 

One pound of canned salmon, costing twelve cents, 
would furnish protein (which builds and repairs the 
body) at a cost of fifty-five cents per pound, while one 



eight one-pound tins were put up on the North Pacific 
Coast — a total of 449,670,288 tins. And the bulk of 
that great quantity has gone into consumption as far 
as the records go, without disturbance to the health of 
a dozen individuals. 

That is more than can be said of any similar quan- 
tity of fresh fish or meats. 

♦ »*• ♦ 

A Japanese statesman was asked why be favored 
the spread of Christianity, and replied : " The Chris- 
tian subjects of Japan are conspicuous for orderly con- 
duct and faithful discharge of obligations." 

*^ ^ ^ 

There never was a day that did not bring its own 
opportunities for doing good that could not have been 
done before and never can be again. 



the: inglenook. 



1 



AN OPTICAL ILLUSION. 



How many Nookers have ever noticed a picture of 
a man pointing a finger directly in front of him while 
he is represented as in the act of saying something, 
or it may be a pistol in the hands of the man pointing 
directly in front of and at the spectator as he stands 
before him? Now, whichever way one places himself 
to the right or the left of this picture the man will 
still seem to be pointing directly at him. The pistol 
seems to meet one as soon as he comes in sight of the 
picture and follow him in every direction that he may 
go until he passes clean out of sight. What is the 
cause of this ? 

It is because the picture is painted on a flat surface, 
showing the same breadth of the face on each side of a 
line drawn so as to cut the picture exactly in two. 
There is just as much of the picture on one side of the 
line as on the other and is just exactly what would 
appear if a person were standing directly in front of 
it. Now, move to one side and the picture remains 
just the same, with just as much on one side as on 
the other of the imaginary line, cutting it in two. 
Move any distance whatever and the picture remains 
the same. The pistol is continually pointing at the 
man who looks. If a side picture is drawn, no matter 
how you look at it, it is still a side picture and can 
be made nothing else. 

The illusion is due to the spectator's being deceived 
by the position of the face. One can verify this by 
looking at a picture which looks straight forward, 
.^n)' way you move in front of it, the eyes of the pic- 
ture follow you because you are accustomed to see- 
ing things in that shape, and thus any way you move, 
the picture still remains as it actually is. This will ac- 
count for the fact that the eyes and pistol of the man 
in question show at all angles just what it is intended 
to show, the picture of a man pointing straight in 
front of him, and you cannot get away from that 
straight-in-front influence. 

A still better illustration is that if three men are 
pointing a gun at you straight in front of you all you 
will see of the middle gun is a hole represented by the 
muzzle. The man holding the gun and the two men 
on each side show clearly what the hole means. Any 
way you turn or any way you look you see nothing but 
the hole in the middle gun because there is nothing 
but a hole to see. Consequently it seems to follow 
around whichever way you move though it does not, 
but it seems to follow, because the picture is so drawn. 
4> 4> * 
DOMESTICATING SNAKES. 



he had the conventional pictures in his mind of men be- 
ing crushed and swallowed by anacondas and boas. 

" Years ago," he said, " I read an account written 
by a naturalist of these monsters in their native state, 
coiling and uncoiling themselves like lightning, and 
coughing and hissing with such a roar as could be com- 
pared only to the e.xhaust of a powerful steam engine. 
■ ' What is the truth about these mysterious rep- 
tiles ? ' I have asked nearly every native I met in 
the South American countries if he had ever seen a 
boa or an anaconda. Most of them had not. To those 
who had I put the question : 

■' ' What do they look like? ' 

■ -And the answer was always : " Their movement 
is very, very slow, and they are not ferocious.' 

" I met an anaconda on the Upper Maranan, a great 
lilack and yellow snake, all coiled up. I drew my re- 
volver and fired at the coil. Instead of the terrible 
convulsions of which I had read the coil rolled over, 
remained stationary a moment, then rolled back and lay 
as before. I fired again. The coil sank slowly in the 
water and disappeared. 

" These snakes can easily be domesticated. Some 
men ran upon an anaconda in the woods near the rub- 
ber camp. They threw a fish net over it and brought it 
to camp, where they let it go. It crawled away into 
the river, but came back often and crawled around the 
yard so much that they got tired of looking at it. So 
they put it in a bo.x and sent it to Iquitos. We meas- 
ured it : it was just twenty-four feet six inches long." 
♦ * ♦ 
ERRORS AS TO COIN VALUES. 



William C. .^gle, who has spent many years in 
South America, upsets many old notions about danger- 
ous reptiles. When he first went to South America 



It is a very common error among amateur numis- 
matists that age gives to coins a peculiar value. While 
this ma)' be true in some instances the fact does not 
hold good invariably. A well-known collector of rare 
specimens of the world's coinage remarked recently : 

" After the auction sale of every famous collection of 
coins as the result of an apparently slight error in the 
published reports as to the date of some of the coins 
sold we are fairly deluged with letters and personal 
visits, oflfering coins for sal^ for which there is little 
or no premium. But what may seem to be an insigni- 
ficant mistake makes all the difference in the world in 
the value of the coin. 

" As an instance, at the auction sale in London the 
other day of the ]\lurdoch collection among the Amer- 
ican coins sold was a dollar of 1794. This coin 
brought $240, which is not an unusual figure for it, as 
there are not many of them in existence, and it was 
the first dollar piece to be minted by the United States 
government. Rut the dispatch from London, as pub- 
lished, announced that this large premium had been 
paid for a 1795 dollar, making a mistake, apparently 
trifling to those unacquainted with the value of coins, 
of only one year. 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



" Now, as a matter of fact, there are hundreds of 
1795 dollars in existence, many of them having been 
carefully wrapped up in cotton and laid in the bottom 
of bureau drawers, their owners thinking that they 
must be extremely valuable on account of their old 
date, the impression being general that the value of 
coins entirely depends on their age. 

" No sooner did these people see in the papers where 
their dollars were said to be worth $240 than ithey dug 
them out of their hiding places and rushed to the near- 
est coin dealer. 

■' And to make matters worse, we were so over- 
whelmed with letters from out-of-town persons offer- 
ing their coins for sale that the mail carriers must have 
thought we had gone into some get-rich-quick business. 
So many persons called at our rooms, which, you see, 
are rather small, but still have always been commodious 
enough to answer the requirements of ordinary busi- 
ness, that the place was crowded and they had to stand 
in line and wait their turn for a personal interview. 

" I suspected from the unusual rush of business that 
some such mistake had been made and after having 
been offered dollar after dollar of the 1795 issue I 
finally came to the conclusion that the best way out 
of the difficulty would be to address the crowd as a 
body. So I said that it was the 1794 dollar for which 
the large premium had been paid, a mistake having 
been made in the figures and that their 1795 dollars 
were worth just $4. 

" Our callers at once turned away in disgust and 
disappointment, but the stream of letters continued for 
several days longer and indicated the existence of 
more coins of this date than I had thought to be pos- 
sible." 

* ♦ *?• 

TELLS STORIES FOR LIVING. 



A PRETTY girl in Boston named Miss Sarah Cone 
Bryant has revived the institution of the old story- 
teller whose business in life was to entertain children 
with tales of adventure, love and mystery, receiving 
for his entertainment a dole that sufficed for his daily 
wants. Miss Bryant has become exceedingly pop- 
ular in her new role and has developed for the benefit 
of all those whom her work can reach, as well as for 
her own pleasure, a gift which it is the fortune of very 
few people to possess, that of telling a tale in such a 
way as to prove of an absorbing interest to " grown- 
ups " as well as to the youngsters. 

For a long while she has been telling stories to chil- 
dren for her own pleasure as well as for their own, 
says the Philadelphia North American. 

Lately, however, she decided that by talking to moth- 
ers' clubs and literary associations she could widen 
the field of her endeavor and accomplish her purpose 
to far better advantage. 



" Tlie use of story-telling for educational purposes 
is by no means new to a certain extent," she said re- 
cently. 

" Every mother has used it since mothers first were 
and the teachers of kindergartens came to be, and 
long, long before kindergartens were ever thought of 
there were the court story-tellers who had the art of 
narrative down to a point as fine as never to have been 
equaled in later days. 

'■ I tell stories to children's parties, sometimes in 
drawing-rooms where a few children of the wealthier 
part of the community are the guests, sometimes to 
hundreds of children of all classes gathered in a hall 
as the guests of a club or school and very often to 
members of a Sunday school at the time of Christmas 
trees. 

" When you tell a story to children you tell them 
only the best and most beautiful parts of the story. 
You unconsciously leave out all that which is not ab- 
solutely necessary for the understanding of the sto- 
ry. Take, for instance, the classic fairy tales, the sto- 
ries along that line as Grimm's, Anderson's and the 
standard inventions that have come down through gen- 
eration after generation. 

" Next to the fairy tales and the allegories come 
the historical legends. These are for the older chil- 
dren and are of great value in teaching history. Ev- 
eryone, child or adult, like the stories of the heroes, 
and if you narrate your history in the form of a story 
about some great man or woman you will not only hold 
the attention, but you will fix in the hearer's mind the 
facts of the story." 

^ ^* ^ 

GOING ACROSS THE OCEAN. 

Fivii children, whose combined ages amount to only 
35 years, were passengers traveling alone on the steam- 
er " Switzerland," which has arrived from Antwerp. 
The eldest, Wilhelm, 1 1 years, of Bruck an der Muhr, 
Austria, acted as guardian for his brother Joseph, 10 
years, and his three sisters, Ida, 9 years, and two babies, 
Anna, 3 years, and Emma, 2 years old. 

Their father arrived in America last March and se- 
cured work as a machinist at Columbus, O. In Tuly 
he sent for his wife and children. The mother, who 
was in delicate health, on the receipt of the money to 
take her and her little ones to see their father, was so 
overjoyed that she died. Kind neighbors bought the 
tickets and placed the little ones on the big steamer and 
the stewardess looked after them, being aided in her 
efforts by a number of the passengers. 
* ♦ ♦ 

Strength of character is not mere strength of feel- 
ing ; it is the resolute restraint of strong feeling. It is 
unyielding resistance to whatever would disconcert us 
from without or unsettle us from within. — Dickens. 



i8 



the: ingleinook. 



GIRLS DO THE WOOING. 



Not everywhere do the boys do the wooing. Among 
the gypsies of Moravia, for instance, none will dare 
presume to court a maiden until she has notified 
the young man of her choice of her readiness. This 
she does by using a cake as a love letter, baking therein 
a coin, and throwing it within his tent door at night 
when he is alone. He, of course, is not bound to ac- 
cept. But if he does it behooves him to be faithful. 
The Romany of Hungary knows naught of breach of 
promise suits. Instead, the relations and friends of 
the jilted maiden wait upon the inconstant lover, ar- 
gue with him, plead with him. Then, if he still re- 
main obdurate, he is maimed by a shot in the leg or 
arm. 

By ancient Romany custom, too, the slighted girl 
has the right to be present and to decree in which of 
his limbs he shall be wounded. In practice, however, 
she usually elects to stay away, thereby leaving the 
fearful choice to him. 

A marriageable Burmese girl as soon as she has 
completed her trousseau places in her window the 
" love lamp," and according to whether its interject- 
ing beams, carefully directed from behind with her 
own tiny toilet mirror, shine on this hut or on that 
the gallant within knows that somewhere a lassie's 
heart is inclined towards him. 

When one of the cigarmakers of southern Spain. 
who constitute a separate class by themselves, casts 
her eyes lovingly on a likely lad she forthwith twists 
her powder puff into a pompon for his hat. If he 
wears it at the next bull fight it is considered a match. 

The Andalusian peasant girl sends a pumpkin pie 
to the particular swain she afifects. If he eats it, well 
and good ; she is engaged. If not, she tries elsewhere, 
pie following pie until success is arrived at. 

Swiss maidens go a-wooing not alwa\s and any- 
how, but at stated intervals, the eves of the weddings 
of their friends. Then is held what is known as the 
" feast of the love garlands." All the unmarried 
girls who can claim acquaintance with either bride or 
bridegroom assemble at sunset at the latter 's house, 
dance, sing, and make merry. Then when the dawn 
is gray they take their departure, each girl bearing 
away with her a posy gayly decked with ribbon. 

This she hangs on the way home upon the door 
knob of the house where resides the youth of her 
heart's desire or flings it through the open casement 
of his bedchamber. She may select who she will on 
these occasions, provided she does not stray beyond ■ 
the limits of her own canton. For this latter is. ac- 
cording to Swiss ideas, unpardonable. Should she 
be_ suspected of it a straw puppet is left dangling, 
presumably as a hint of the fate that may befall her- 
self, outside her chamber window, while the young 



men of the village whom she has jointly and several- 
ly slighted conspire together to waylay and beat the 
unlucky stranger whose offense and misfortune it is to 
have been the object of her wayward choice. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
SLEEPING CAR HOUSECLEANING. 



A SHORT time ago the traveling population of the 
United States was startled and alarmed at the sue- 
gestion, publicly made, that dangerous diseases are 
frequently transmitted by sleeping car berths. Thou- 
sands of persons, it was pointed out, occupied these 
beds in the space of a single month, none of whom 
were required to furnish a medical certificate as to 
good health. In some cases these travelers might be 
in the last stages of consumption or other disease. 

The anxiety aroused by these statements was so 
general that the Pullman Company thought best to 
make a statement concerning the method employed 
by them for the prevention of disease. 

Their statement reveals a vigorous and novel sys- 
tem of housecleaning : 

■■ As soon as a Pullman car arrives at its destina- 
tion," says the authorized account, " it is entirely 
stripped, the carpets are beaten and aired and the in- 
terior of the car is thoroughly scrubbed with soap and 
water. The blankets are taken out of the car and are 
thoroughly blown out with compressed air at a ninety- 
pound pressure. It is impracticable to wash them 
after every trip, but they go to the laundry several 
times a year, which is oftener than is the case with 
hotel blankets. All linen is renewed each trip. 

" Every case of sickness in a car, however trivial, 
is followed by the antiseptic cleansing of the section 
occupied by the sick person, and the entire car is 
sprayed with formaldehyde. 

" As a further sanitary precaution, in the newer 
cars of the company purely decorative draperies are 
being omitted, and the necessary ones, such as berth 
curtains, are 'oeing made of a lighter material which 
does not hold dust or odors." 

♦ ♦ "S" 

At the beginning of the last century the royal col- 
lege of Bavarian physicians sought to forbid steam 
railway travel, because it would induce delirium fur- 
iosum among the passengers and drive the spectators 
crazy, while an English quarterly said that it would 
as soon expect the people to sufl^er themselves to be 
tied to one of Congreve's rockets as to trust them- 
selves to the mercy of a locomotive going at the pro- 
digious rate of- twelve miles an hour. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Lilt your devotion be the language of filial love and 
gratitude: confide in this kindness of fathers every 
want and every wish of your heart. — Selected. 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



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the: inglenook. 






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The wintry clouds may gather. 

The sunlight may depart; 
What reck we of the shadows. 

If 'tis sunshine in the heart? 

Though cares may fall unnumbered 
As we tread life's troublous mart, 

What heed we of the burden 
If 'tis summer in the heart? 

The sun is ever shining — 

If with love we have a part, 
'Tis summer, always summer. 

With a lovelight in the heart. 

— Emily Stuart Weed. 
<J> •}• * 

HOW THE SULTAN LOOKS. 



The sultan of Turkey, Abdul Hamid, has been made 
prematurely old by the anxiety that has haunted him 
ever since he ascended the throne. He is in con- 
stant fear of assassination. An Englishwoman, who 
saw him recently on his pilgrimage to the shrine at 
Stamboul, involuntarily exclaimed, " The poor old 
man ! " 

" Yes, madam," said an Englishman of several 
years' residence in Turkey, " that is the sultan," and he 
pointed over the heads of soldiers several rows deep, 
lining the thoroughfare on either side, to a queer, old- 
fashioned turnout in which sat a little, old man, bent 
nearly double and clad all in black. 

" That is he just raising his hand," said the inform- 
ant, and as a cheer that savored of much practice went 
up from the lines of soldiers the little man raised a 
clawlike hand on a level with his hooked nose. 

" Why, how old a man is he? " asked the woman. 

" Sixty? Why, look at his hair and mustache — 
jet black! " was her exclamation when the monarch's 
age was given. 

" That's dye, madam, just plain dye," said the Eng- 
lishman. " It would never do for the Raven (that's 
what they call him here) to grow old, you know. 

" Let me tell you a little about him," the volunteer 
guide continued. " This is an unusual occasion. The 
sultan rarely leaves his palace. Just once a year he 
ventures out under heavy guard to pay his holy duties 
at Stamboul, and once each week — every Friday — the 
ceremony of the Selemlik is observed. Then he goes 
from the palace down the hill to his private mosque. 
These are the only times at which he leaves the palace. 

" I know he seems a powerful monarch — and he is — 
but I wouldn't take the job at any price. Trouble, 
trouble, everv moment of his life. Trouble with for- 



eign countries, trouble at home, trouble with his of- 
ficials, trouble with his harem, assassins and spies about 
him day and night. Would you be the sultan ? " 

The woman, as she turned away, exclaimed : " The 
poor old man ! " 

♦ 4> ♦ 

HOW PERFUMES ARE MADE. 



The manufacture of perfumes deserves to rank as 
one of the finest arts. The extraction of the essences 
from flowers, such as jasmine, tuberose, violet and 
cassia, has long been carried out by the process of en- 
fleurage, the blossoms being left in contact with puri- 
fied lard for a few days and tlien replaced by fresh 
blossoms. The lard is either sold as such, or the essen- 
tial oil may be extracted from it by melting it under 
strong alcohol. 

As the process of enfleurage is somewhat tedious, 
attempts have frequently been made to extract the oil 
directly from the flowers by means of light petroleum, 
but these processes have not, as a rule, proved suc- 
cessful and it has recently been found that a very large' 
proportion of the perfume is actually produced for the 
first time in .the blossoms during the time occupied by 
the enfleurage. 

An interesting illustration of this is given by Dr. 
Albert Hesse in a recent number of the Berichte, in 
which he states that a ton of tuberose blossoms yield- 
ed only sixty-six grams of oil when extracted with 
light petroleum, but during enfleurage yielded 
8or grams of oil to the fat in which they 
were imbedded, while a further seventy-eight 
grams remained in the faded blossoms and could be 
separated by die extraction or distillation. It thus ap- 
pears that eleven times as much perfume is produced 
during enfleurage as is originally present in the 
flowers, and that even after enfleurage the exhausted 
flowers contain more perfume than when first gath- 
ered. 

•:• •:• ■> 

TO RELIEVE CHOKING. 



Raising the left arm as high as you can will re- 
lieve choking much more rapidly than by being 
thumped on the back. And it is well that everyone 
should know it, for often a person gets choked while 
eating when there is no one near to thump him. 
Frequently at meals and when they are at play, chil- 
dren get choked while eating, and the customary man- 
ner of relieving them is to slap them sharply on the 



the: ingleinook 



21 



back. The effect of this is to set the obstruction free, 
so that it can be swallowed. The same thing can be 
brought about by raising the left hand of the child 
as high as possible, and the relief comes much more 
rapidh-. In happenings of this kind there should be 
no alarm, for if a child sees that older persons or 
parents get excited he is very liable to get so also. The 
best thing is to tell the child to raise his left arm, and 
immediately the difficulty passes down. 



STEAMED PRUNE ROLL. 



•J* ^ ^ 



HOW TO KEEP ICE IN A SICK ROOM. 



A VEKV simple but little known method of keeping 
ice is to draw a piece of thick flannel tightly over some 
deep vessel, like a bowl, for instance^ and fasten it 
there. The ice is placed on top of this drumhead and 
covered loosely by another piece of flannel. 

In this condition the ice keeps cool and even freezes 
to the flannel. Thus a small piece of ice can be kept 
near the patient all night, so as to avert many weary 
marches up and down-stairs to the refrigerator. 

To break the ice a sharp needle or hat pin is the 
best thing. Force it in and you \v\\\ be astonished 
to see how easily it will divide the ice. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
HOW DIFFERENT NATIONS SALUTE. 



A Turk will solemnly cross his hands on his breast 
and make a profound obeisance when he bids fare- 
well. 

The genial Japanese will take his slipper off as you 
depart, and say with a smile : " You are going to leave 
my despicable house in your honorable journeying — I 
regard thee ! " 

The Filipino's parting benediction is bestowed by 
rubbing his friend's face with his hand. 

The German '' Leben Sie wohl " is not particularly 
sympathetic in its sound, but it is less embarrassing to 
those it speeds than the performance to the Hindoo, 
who. when vou go from him, falls in the dust at your 
feet. 

Fiji Islanders cross two red feathers. Natives of 
New Guinea exchange chocolates. The Burmese bend 
low, and say : " Hib ! Hib ! " 

The South Sea Islanders rattle each other's whale 
teeth necklace. 

The Russian form of parting salutation is brief, con- 
sisting of the single word " Praschai," which sounds 
like a sneeze. 

The Otaheite Islander will twist the end of the de- 
parting guest's robe, and then solemnly shake his two 
hands three times. 

*> ♦ ^ 

The greatest'of all mountain railways is that which 
ascends Mount Lowe, to an altitude of six thousand 
feet at a forty-eight per cent grade. 



Make a biscuit dough of two cupfuls flour, one 
level tablespoon ful baking powder, butter size of a 
walnut and about three-quarters of a cupful of milk. 
Toss on a floured board, pat and roll out to about half 
an inch in thickness. Fill in the center with some 
fresh prunes which have been stoned and sugared, 
and bring the dough around the fruit. Carefully lift 
it into a buttered mould or five-pint lard pail, cover 
closely and steam one and a half, hours. Serve with 

FOAMY S.\UCE. 

Cream half a cupful of butter, add a cupful of pow- 
dered sugar and flavor with vanilla. Set aside until 
just before serving them add a fourth of a cupful of 
hot milk and the white of an egg beaten to a foam. 
•J" ♦ 4> 
DELICATE FISHBALLS. 



Boil the quantity of codfish that would be required, 
changing the water once that it may not be too salt, so 
that it will be feathery. It cannot be done fine enough 
with a fork, and should be picked by hand. At the 
same time have hot boiled potatoes ready, mash them 
thoroughly, and make them creamy with milk and a 
good-sized lump of butter. To three cupfuls of 
mashed potatoes take one and one-half cupfuls of fish ; 
the fish should not be packed down. Beat one egg 
lightly and stir into the other ingredients and season 
to taste. Beat the mixture well together and until 
light, then mold it into small balls, handling lightly, 
and before frying roll the balls in flour. Frv them in 
smoking hot i.it until a gold color. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
RAISIN COOKIES. 



Mix two whole eggs with one and a half cupfuls 
of granulated sugar. Stir in a level teaspoonful of 
soda into a cupful of thick sour cream and add to the 
eggs and sugar. Put in a large cupful of seeded and 
chopped raisins. Beat in enough flour to make a soft 
dough. Turn out on the molding board and roll out, 
cut and bake. These cookies are the soft rich cakes 
children tease for. 

♦J* ^ *^ 

Put together in a porcelain-lined kettle two quarts 
of chopped celery, three quarts best vinegar, half an 
ounce each crushed white ginger root and tumeric, one- 
fourth pound of white mustard seed, two tablespoon- 
fuls of salt and four of white sugar. Cook slowly until 
cabbage and celery are tender. 
.J. ^ •> 

If any of the Bureau Drawer people have a lot of 
wall paper that has become soiled, rub the spots with 
dry plaster of Paris. When the dirt has all been re- 
moved, dust off the powder with a soft cloth. 



the: iNGL-EINOOK. 



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TAILY'S FIRST PARTY. 



CHILDREN ON TH1-: CALIFORNIA BEACH. 



COME UP FROM THE SWEET BEGUILING. 



BY WALTER JNk H.AZFJ.TINE. 



Ho! bonny boy, with tlie freckled face. 

Freckled face and smiling; 
Tattered hat and jaunty grace. 

Dreamy thoughts beguiling: 
Down where the willows nod and dance. 

Down by the sandy beaches. 
Watching the rippling waves that prance. 

And the song the catbird ^crocche^ 

Ho! I .-ay. with your dreamy eye-. 

Dreamy ej-es and dancin.a:. 
There's a land out yon where the rainbow lies 

And the sunset gold is glancing. 
'Tis the land of Dream-, where fairies dw<ll. 

The land of Laughing Water: 
But down in the vale. Lve heard them tell. 

Ls the baneful land of Loiter. 

So, ho! my lad, with the freckled face. 

Freckled face and smiling. 
Lift your eyes from the haunted place. 

And the fairies' sweet beguiling. 
Coiiie up from the river's willowed shore: 

Come up from the sandy beaches. 
And lend your ear to the muffled roar 

Of the wind on the hilltop reaches. 

For there's truth in life, my boy, you'll find. 

•And dreams are the play of fairies 
That come to dwell in tlie sleepy mind 

Of the boy who only tarries. 
So, lad, come up from the loiter place, 

From the river and the willows, 
And against the morning set your face. 

And against the rocks and billows. 



" Come along, children," said the old mouse, " it's 
nearly supper-time ;" and he began to run along the 
pantry shelf. Nibble and Nobble jumped up and fol- 
lowed their father. 

■ Be quick, Taily, or we shall have all the cheese," 
they cried. 

But Taily, who was helping his mother to make the 
little straw beds, answered: "I'll come in a minute; 
you needn't wait for me," 

His mother patted his soft, gray head, " You've 
been a very good boy, Taily," she said, '.' The hole is 
cjuite tidy now, so run and have your supper." 

Taily ran ofif, his whiskers bristling with pleasure 
at his mother's words. Along the shelf he ran until 
he came to the cheese dish, where his father and broth- 
ers were eating their supper. The old mouse gave him 
a nice, big lump, but Taily, pushing it in front of him, 
went back to the hole. 

" Here, mother," he cried, " I thotight you would 
he htingry, so I've brought you something to eat." 

■■ Oh, thank you, deary! " she said, fondly. And off 
went Taily once more, 

Tiiis time his father was not to be seen, and the 
cheese-dish was covered up. So the little mouse wan- 
dered on until he came to a large cake covered with 
white and pink sugar, and smelling, oh, so good! 

" Here's a prize! " he thought, and, jumping on the 
dish, he began to nibble his way through the sugar. 
Everv bite seemed nicer than the last, and by the time 
he had finished bis supper, he had eaten his way right 
into the middle of the cake. By this time he was 
feeling very tired ; so, curling himself up in the hole 
he had made, he fell fast asleep. 

Wh'en Taily awoke, he was very much surprised to 
hear the inurmnr of voices and a rattle of tea-cups 
close by. 

" Well, I am safe here," he thought. " Nobody can 
reach me." 

But just then he heard the sugar crack, and some- 
thing sharp touched his tail. 

"Oh, dear! whatever is going to happen?" 
squeaked poor Taily. 

Suddenly a piece of cake fell out, and he found him- 
self in the middle of a large table, around which were 
seated several little boys and girls. 

Out sprang Taily, and they all began to shout and 
laugh. The little mouse, frightened nearly out of his 
wits, scampered across the table, and, dropping on to 
the floor, rushed home as fast as he could go. 



the: ingl-eznook 



23 



'^; 



rfh Jfc rffc A A ji 






\^W^ 



Is it right to give away a gift when received? 

Circumstances must govern all such cases. Some- 
times a gift may be doing duty a dozen times among 
different people by putting it in circulation. Every- 
thing will depend upon the nature of it. The lucky 
or unlucky recipient of a dozen pen wipers might be 
excused for giving a few of them to his friends, while 
an ornament made from the hair of a near relative is 
not a subject for gratuitous distribution. As said be- 
fore, one's judgment must govern all such cases. If 
a gift is passed along the line the giving need not be 
advertised. 

Can the manufacture of baskets be made profitable for 
individuals? 

A great many people make their living by making 
baskets, but it is not generally regarded as being a 
fruitful source of income. However, if baskets of 
artistic shape and character are made, there would 
be no difficulty in selling them. Reference is had to 
baskets made by Indians and other semicivilized peo- 
ple. Before undertaking it it would be well to ex- 
amine some specimens of work. 



What is the difference between cocoa and chocolate? 

They are both the same thing practically, only the 
vegetable fat is squeezed out of the chocolate to make 
the cocoa. 

<^ 

What is the largest lake in the world? 

Lake Superior, 430 miles long and one thousand 

feet deep. 

<^ 

From what point is the mosl grain shipped in ihe 
United States? 

The greatest grain port in the world is in Chicago. 

♦ 
How long is it since the discovery of matches? 
The first matches came into general use about the 
year 1834. 

* 

What is the area of the Pacific ocean? - 
Seventy-one million square miles. 

* 

What is the legal rate of interest in California? 

Seven per cent, but any rate may be contracted for. 



Can the Inglenook give a formula for a good dentifrice? 

Pulverized charcoal, camphor, orris root, and pul- 
verized chalk in equal parts, powdered and well mixed, 
will make as good a dentifrice as you can find any- 
where. If wanted, any fragrant substance may be 
added ; a drop or two of wintergreen will give it a 
wintergreen flavor. The most important feature about 
it is the camphor. 

Where does Christmas holly come from ? 

The native holly is found growing from Virginia 
southward. It also grows in the old world, in the 
warmer sections of the country. It has been used for 
decorative and gift purposes long before the Chris- 
tian era. 

* 

How fast does electricity move? 

Well, nobody knows how fast electricity goes. The 
records say 288,000 miles per second. 

* 

Who first invented clocks? 

Lt is not known who was the inventor, but they wore 
first made in England in 1568. 



What is the population of London? 
4,231,431- 

What is the largest city in the world? 
London. 

Where were watches first made? 

At Nuremburg, and it took a year to make one. 

When was the first English Bible printed? 

In 1535 and was known as Coverdale's Bible. 

* 
When was the mariner's compass first used? 
In the year 1200. 

Will mercury freeze? 

Yes, at fort}' degrees below zero it becomes solid. 

* 

When was the American flag adopted by congress? 
In the year 1777. 

What is the St. Louis exposition intended to celebrate? 
The Louisiana Purchase from the French in 1803. 



How far is it from New York by water to India? 
That will depend considerable. By water to Cal- 
cutta is 12,425 miles. 



Can the Nook give the distance between New York City 
and Salt Lake City. Utah? 
It is 2,430 miles. 



the: ingl-enook. 



THANKS. 



This is the first chance we have had to collectively 
say thanks to our many friends for the gifts of Christ- 
mas and Christmas week. Thanks for the holly with 
its red berries and sharp-pointed leaves. In early 
days the Christians always accompanied their gifts 
with a spray of holly, and that was the Roman custom 
too. It meant an undying regard just as the holly 
was evergreen. Yes, thanks for the holly. Thanks 
for the mistletoe, too, with its small green leaves and 
its waxen berries. It is a stranger in the far north 
where the wind howled and the snow swept around 
the corner on Christmas day. There was no place to 
hang it, so we keep in our heart a grateful remem- 
brance of those who sent it. 

Thanks for the candy, and the candy, and the can- 
dy. The poorest of it was better than the best you 
can buy in the stores. You cannot buy any candy 
flavored with love at the best store in the land. So the 
people who sent the candy to the Nookman know just 
how he feels about it, as it really was good, every 
bit of it. 

And thanks for the pen wiper, though a pen is a 
good deal of a fiction around the Nook office. There 
is one somewhere here, but half the time nobody can 
find it. A sharp pencil and a couple of typewriters 
make the marks on paper, but that is no reason why we 
are not grateful for our pen wiper, for we are. Yes, 
thanks again for that spectacle wiper. Just as writ- 
ten on the chamois, " The world will never look just 
right unless you keep your glasses bright." 
Gracias ! Then there are the fountain pen, the pic- 
tures, the slippers, flowers and the letters that have 
come to say, " Merry Christmas," and a " Happy 
New Year." This world is not so bad a world after 
all as some people would like to make it, especially 
when there is so much to be thankful for, and glad 
over. 

* 4> <S> 

VOICED MY SENTIMENTS. 



I GREATLY appreciate the historical and religious por- 
tions of the Inglenook as given from time to time. 
And especially am I interested in the descriptions of 
Minnesota, North Dakota, Montana,, Idaho, Wash- 
ington, Oregon, California, Arizona, New Mexico, 
Utah, Colorado and Kansas. I have investigated all 
the above States, and find that the Nook has voiced my 
sentiments in the descriptions, and especially in the 
fact that the editor advises people to visit and investi- 
gate these new countries before moving, which I think 
is very fair. 

I have traveled over thirty-two States, besides Can- 
ada, and I find certain advantages in each of these 
States, including also the disadvantages, and human 
beings have inclinations greatly diflfering one from an- 



other, so that which one person admires another may 
dislike. As these States vary in their peculiarities, 
just so do the inclinations vary in the different people 
who constitute our population. 

There are places to suit every varied opinion, there- 
fore by investigation every one can possess the equiva- 
lent of their heart's content. This is written for the 
benefit of the readers, and to substantiate the theory of 
tlie Editor of the Nook. Joseph H. Wenger. 

South English, loiva. 

.♦. ^ .♦. 

A v.\LUED contributor to the Inglenook says that he 
would like to have an index to the magazine so as 
to find what he wants. He says it is like the needle 
in a haystack to hunt up an article that is wanted. We 
have had this under consideration for a long time, 
and may arrive at some satisfactory conclusion in the 
near future. It is a good deal easier to talk about 
than to apply practically. However we are giving it 
our attention, and in the future something mav come 
out of it. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

We shall find that the love of nature, wherever it 
has existed, has been a faithful and sacred element of 
human feeling; that is to say, supposing all the cir- 
cumstances, otherwise the same with respect to two in- 
dividuals, the one who loves nature most will be al- 
ways found to have more capacity for faith in God 
than the other. — Ritskin. 

* * * 

M. M. Johnson, of Clay Center, Iowa, sends out a 
catalogue full of interesting incubator pictures. It 
will be especially attractive to children on account of 
the chicken pictures. 

Want Advertisements. 



Wanted. — An old man who wants a home can find 
such a place by addressing the Editor of the Ingle- 
nook, Elgin, III. 

Wanted. — A girl about ten or twelve years of age, 
of good family, for a home in Dakota. Address, the 
Editor of the Ikglenook. 

* 

Wanted. — A good Brother farmtr with team to 
work a 150-acre farm — fifty acres in orchard. Ad- 
dress 5. Z. Sharp, Friiita, Colo. The above is a good 
chance for a man with a boy or two. 

♦ 

Wanted, in a good North Missouri town, a com- 
petent blacksmith. Good wages, good country, cli- 
mate, church privileges, etc. A brother preferred. — 
/). A. Moats, Polo, Mo. 



the: inqlenook. 



ARE YOU LOOKING 



rOK THE BEST SEWING 

MACHINE ON EARTH? 



H so, look for the 
highest Arm made, 
latest Bobbin Wind- 
er. Patent Tension 
Liberator, Positive 
Take-up. Thread di- 
rect from Spool to 
Needle, Double Lock 
Stitcb. widest range 
of adjustment. Self- 
threading Shuttle, 
Self-setting Needle. 
Ball-bearinff.^vitli 
35 years' Ru^ran- 
tee. Our "Equity" 
has all of these, and 
you mav have the 
privilege of ordering 
It at our 



SPECIAT. CASH PRICE 

which is lower than dealers 
pay'for^them. 



S16.45 

For our High Arm. High 
Grade. Ball-bearing. New 
Equity Sewing Machine, 
complete in this style cabinet. 



SEND FOR CAT.ALOG. 




NEW CURE FOR 



THE EQUITY MFG. & SUPPLY CO. 
Chicago, 111. 



SAVE YOUR HAIR 

Dr. H. F. Knoblauch's 

GERMAN HAIR TONIC 

Is positively known to cure baldness in from 
tbree to six months; restore gray hair to its 
natural color In three weeks; remove dandruff 
in four applications; stop hair from falling out 
and cure all diseases of the scalp. It is no dye 
and is positively harmless. Every bottle guar- 
anteed. 50 cent and Si .00 sizes. Sent by express 
to any address upon receipt of price. Express 
charges prepaid in lots of three Si. 00 bottles or 
more. Agents wanted. 

THOMAS BROTHERS, 
44 N. Clark St., Chicago, IlL 



It4 



Mention tin; INGLEiS'OOK when writing. 



Stock of hardware and store building in a 
good North Dakota town. Doing a good busi- 
ness and it will increase rapidly as the country 
settles up. This is a good farming country 
and we have no competition, and a good chance 
for some one to build up a large trade. There 
is a large congregation of German Baptists at 
this place and they also have a church here. 
Our stock is all new and will invoice about 
$2,500. The building and lots at $1,600. 
Will sell at a bargain if taken at once. 

Address : 

McCUTCMIN & SON, 

it4 SURREY, NORTH DAKOTA. 

General Nursery Stock. 

Apple. Peach, Pear. Cherry. Plum, .\pricot 
and Quince Trees. Berries, Grapes, Hardy Roses 
and Shrubs; Vines. Evergreens, etc. Strictly 
first-class. Satisfaction guaranteed. Write for 
prices. Agents wanted. 48tr3 

E. MOHLER. Plattsburg, Mo. 

In the Ingflenook 

There is always room for wide- 
awake advertisers, who can appre- 
ciate the superior advantages of 
our journal. Write us. 



.>.;..■ 



Free! Free!! 

Our 1903-04 64-page 

Book and Bible... 
-^^Catalogue 

It contains many handsome cuts of 
books and Bibles and gives full descrip- 
ion and price of same. In fact it is the 
largest and most complete catalogue 
ever put out by the House. Order it 
now. A postal card will bring it to you. 

Address 

Brethren Publishing Hodse 

El^in, Illinois. 






Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 

BRETHREN PUBLISHINQ HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



Catarrh 



SENT ON TRIAL, FREE 




WBY SUFFER LONGER 



When a Positive Cure is at Your 
Command and only Await- 
ing a Trial ? 

»^ 

Don't take medicines in the stom- 
ach to kill germs of Catarrh in the 
head. Nothing but air can reach the 
home of these germs, and when it is 
medicated by passing through the 
Inhaler, the germs are completely 
destroyed. Cures Catarrh, Head 
Colds, Bronchitis, Headache, La 
Grippe and all diseases of the air 
passages yield as if by magic. 

No Money Wanted. 

I will mail any readers of the In- 
glenook one of my new Co-ro-na 
Medicators, with medicine for a 
quick home cure, on FIVE days trial 
free. If it gives satisfaction, send 
me $1.00 (half price), if not, return it 
at ~the expired time, which will only 
cost you 3 cents postage, and you 
will not owe me a penny. Write to- 
day. Agents wanted. Address: 

E. J. WORST, 
10 Main St., Ashland, Ohio. 

Itr Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



■he: INlf^LCTNlOO'^*". 




Enreka Indestructible Post 

Cheapas cedar. 
Made where 
used. N u 
freight to pay. 

Great inducements to agents. For terms, etc.. 

address with stamp, 

SSt.^i; W. A. DICKEY, North Manchester, Ind. 

The florae Gem^^« 

_ Machine. 

The accompanying cat repre- 
sents the washer with the lid 
and new style agitator laid back 
1 claim much for this agitator, 
which my circular explains, as 
well as the entire machine. 

The tub is made of Virginia 
white cedar. Do not decide on 
a macliine before reading my circular, which will 
be sent free on application. Thirty days' trial 
will be allowed and ii the machine does not prove 
satisfactory in every respect 1 will pay the freight 
both ways. Address: 

WM. S. MILLER. 
43ti^ Meyersdale, Pa. 

SENT ON APPROVAL 
to Responsible People 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pen 

Uuaranteed Fine^-f Grade 
I4fc. Solid Gold Pen. 

To test tlie merits of the 
Inglenook as an advertis- 
ing medium we offer your 
choice otj [ 



•M'^^*i*^*^M^ .|i .|. .|. .|. 4 . > ^ .;,^. ^. ,;. , | . .|.^ 








i 



These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles: 
For Only 



SjOO 



Postpaid 

to any 

Address. 



(by registered mail Scents 
extra.) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. gold pen, 
any flexibility desired^ink 
feeding device peifect. 

Either style ^Kichly 
Gold Mouuted for pre- 
sentation purposes, $i.co 
extra. 

Grand Special Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week, if you do not find it 
as represented, fully aS 
fine a value as yon can se- 
cure for three times the 
price in any other makes, 
if not entirely satisfactory 
in every respect return it 
and we will send you $1.10 
for it, the additional ten 
cents is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
pen. 

Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right. Gentlemen's style. 

Lay this Inglenook 
<Iown and writo >OW 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold- 
er sent free of charge with 
each Pen, 

ADDRESS 

LaDghlin Mfg. Co. 

970 Griswold St., 
DETROIT, - MICH. 

44t26 Mpniinn the IMJLKNOOK when writing 



?;l 



The Gospel Messenger 



lA 16-Page Weeklyr 



Devoted entirely to the interests of the Brethren church 
and the cause of Christ. It contains spicy articles on 
live topics written by the ablest thinkers and writers in 
the church. If you are not familiar with it, drop us a 
card and we will take pleasure in mailing you a sample 
copy. 

Special Combination Offer. 

Gospel Messenger, one 3 ear, = = - - $1 50 
The Book ' Eternal Verities," by D. L. Miller, ^tw"'" "25 



I 



BOTH TOGETHER, EITHER OLD 
OR NEW SUBSCRIBERS, . . . 



$1.75 



BRETHREN PUB ISHINQ HOUSE, 

ELGIN, ILLINOIS. 






The Busy Man's Friend... 




Here is a book for you. The Busy 
Man's Frtend is a book that we give away. 
It is not very large. You can carry it in 
your coat pocket, but it is full, from cover 
to cover, of things that every man ought to 
know. It is made up of the odds and ends 
cf information in regard to everyday knowl- 
edge, such as matters of legal interest, 
measurement of buildings, and rules of ac- 
tior. generally Just what you want to 
know and don't know where to find it. 
It is all in the Busy Man's Friend, the 
hook that we give away. Thousands and 
thousands of them have been put out to 
the entire satisfaction of those who got 
them. Have you had yours yet? If not 
here is the way you can get it: Send us the 
name of one new subscriber to the Ingle- 
nook Magazine, remitting $i.oo with your 
order, and we will send you the book free 
of charge for your trouble and also place 
the new name on the mailing list from now 
on until the end of the year 1904. 

You may be a busy man yourself. If so, 
you want a friend of like tastes. That i» 
the book, for The Busy Man's Friend con- 
tains just what you want to know withoul 
wasting your time looking it up in other 
places. See that you get that book as soon 
as the mails can bring it to you. 



Brethren Publishing House, 



Elgin, Illinois. 



the: ingleinook. 



CHEAP RATES 



ON 



HoDsehold Goods and 

Personal Effects 



TO AND FROM 



Colorado, California, Washington, 
Oregon, Utah, 

And All Principal Points West 



Through cars from Chicago with- 
out transfer or rehandling of goods 
en route. Write for rates. Map 
of California free on application. 
If not interested, kindly mention 
to friends who are. =:: 

Trans^Continental Freijs;ht Co., 

325 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

26 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

506 So. Broadway, Los Angeles. 

4otl3 MeDlioii tlie INOLENOOK when writing. 

Howell County, So. Missouri 

Is the country of to-day forthehomeseeker. The 
best plaee in the U. S. for a poor man or a man 
of moderate means to get a start in life. It is a 
rolling, timbered country and no prairie. There 
are lew spots in the U. S. that have better cli- 
mate—short winters, and summers not so hot as 
in the Northern States. The products are corn, 
wheat, oats, rye, timothy, clover and every- 
thing that can be raised in this latitude. It is 
also one of the coming fruit countries of ihe 
U. S. West Plams, the county seat, is a good, 
live town of ."^.Soo people, located on the main 
hne of the Frisco R. R. We have lands for sale 
ranging in price to suit everyone. Would you. 
kind reader, like to have a home in this favored 
country.^ No malaria, etc. No colored people. 
We have just located a few Brethren people 
here and want more We want every reader of 
this paper to write us for our pamphlet, T/ze 
Honieseekers^ Review, land list and map of the 
country. Bank and other references furnished. 
Address at once: 

SIMMONS & EPPS, 

West Plains, Mo. 



52-1 ; 



Mention the INGLKNOOK ' 



MAKE YOUR MONEY EARN 

10 to 20 Per Cent Per Annom 

By investing in a good, honest, legitimate 
enterprise, well established, earning large 
profits and paying dividends of 10 to 20 
per cent per annum, regularly and 
safely. If you have any sum of idle 
money on hand (from S25. 00, upward), it 
will pay you to investigate this. It's 
something we are sure that will interest 
you. Full particulars sent free upon ap- 
plication. Address: 

NEWCOMER & PRICE, 

5it4 MOUNT MORRIS, ILL. 



Mention the INGLE7S00K when ivriting 



YOUR NAME 



On a U. S. postal card and addressed to tis will bring you 

FREE samples of 



Which are purely vegetable in composition and which work 
marvels in curing all diseases of the Stomach, Liver, Kid- 
neys, Bladder, Blood and Constipation. 

Don't fail to write to-day for free samples and circulars. 
Address : 

ALO=ETTA REMEDY COMPANY, Minneapolis, Minn. 



Ueutjon the INGLENOOE when writing. 



BETTER THAN A PHVSICAL CULTURE CLUB." 



THE FAMOUS 



As Practiced by 
DR. P. D. FAHRNEV. 



VICTOR METHOD 



.OF. 



SYSTEM BUILDING 



Send 10 Cents for a 5 Days' Treatment of 



BRAWNTAWNS 



TONIC 
TRIANGULAR TABLETS 



They send new, rich blood coursing through the system and awaken new 
life ani energy. Great builders for weak, tired, over-worked constitutions. 

rEri^^F"oT] Victor Remedies Co., 

j SYSTEiVl BUILDING. : : : P „ ... .« . " 

^ ^ Frederick, Md. 









4StI0 



Uenlioa the INtJLt'NOOK when writina. 



»^t | < , ^l > ^ , ,^^H^M$M$.^M^-M^ ^ l t ^ , l^t , ^ , , ^ , . ^ t^,^M-^»^M$,^HJ^^H$.^M 



BOOKS! BOOKS!! 



, ^)f^ * ^ ' ' I * ' X ' ' * * ' * * ' X ' ' »* ' * * '♦ * c * * » * * t * 



Do you want a list of good books? If so, drop us 
a postal card, asking for our new catalogue. It is 
sent free to any one for the asking. 

If you want to purchase a birthday present or 
gift for any one, a book is always acceptable. 

Address, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
22 and 24 S. State St., Elgin, 111. 




^♦■^ ^•^•"►J*-^*^ 









the: inglenook. 




FREE SAMPLE 

I Send letterorpostal for tree SAMPLE 

' HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smsking 
tor 60c.. or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
barmleas. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford. 
Indiana. We answer all letters. 

SItl.l Menfinn the INGLENOOK when writing 

FOR SALE 



Hardware, Implement and Paint Stock 
located in Mt. Morris, I 1., the site of 
Mt. Morris College. The stock is all 
bright, new and up to date in every way. 
I have other business that demands my 
time and will sell stock at invoice. This 
is a suap for any man wishing to engage 
in business in the best college town in 
Illinois. Call on or address 

B. E. AVEY, Mt. Morris, lU. 

5lt4 




Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car. Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 



A. H. HANSON. C. P. A.. CHICAGO. 



Jl. 



50 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sUetnb nnd deecriptinn may 
qulf'kly ascerlain our f-piiimn free wiietlier an 
Invention is prubnbly )>:itentiihle. Coinninnica- 
tlonsatrictlyocinfldentuil. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. < ililest jteencv fi.>r securnig putenta. 

Patents taken throuch Munn & Co. receive 
special jwtice, wlfliout c harg e, in the 

Scientific JTmerlcan. 

A hand3i>me1y illnstrnted weekly. I,nrcet>t cir- 
culiitiuii <if any orient itlc Jdunial. Tcrins, !f3 a 
year; four niunths, f 1. Sold by all newsdeHlers. 

MUNN &Co.3«'«"""'-v- New York 

Branch Offlce. 626 K St.. WashiDElon. D. C. 



FROM OUTSIDE THE STATE OF KANSAS AND UNSOLICITED. 



S. B. Fahnestock, Sec, McPheeson, Kansas. 

Dear Bro: — After sreetings to you, ... I am very glad to hear of the large en- 
rollment at the college this year. 1 hope and pray that you will have a glorious and prosperous 
year. 

" My eight children have all been at McPherson College, and are now all in the church. 
May the good Lord help us to hold out faithful to the end. 

" I do not say it to flatter vou, but say it because it is true, that the McPherson College is 
sending out a great influence for good in the western country, and by coming in contact with 
those of other schools. I am convinced that McPherson College excels. 

" So I bid you Godspeed. Go on in the good work. You are sowing good seed. Though 
clouds may rise and sometimes the future may look dark, yet press onward and upward, your 
work is telling.'" 

McPherson College, Kansas, emphatically the people's college. Everybody is admitted 
on the basis of character, without examination. 

The school stands for the brotherhood of man. The doors stand wide open for the Ameri- 
can youth who are destined to direct the affairs of the church and country. We educate the 
head, the heart and the hand. Do not attend a college for the purpose of learning how to get 
money without earning it. Attend for the purpose of becoming stronger and nobler; to become 
more efficient in preaching and practicingthe gospel of service 

Enrollment over 330 and still they come. Wake up. Here is a chance. If you don't 
want us to knock at your door with a battering ram. write us at once. 

We stiU want some students to do work for part expenses. McPherson College is doing 
well in numbers, in Christian education and in character building. 4^ti3 

Mcpherson college, McPherson, Kansas. 



INDIA==A PROBLEM 



By W. B. STOVER 



Is one of the best selling books ever put out by the House. It 
contains a large number of illustrations, and describes the work that 
our Missionaries are doing, and the difficulties they have to contend 
with. 

Any one. after reading this book, will have a splendid idea of 

India and Her Customs. 

Also will want to do more to lift her people out of sin and degra- 
dation 

Agents are reporting large s iles of books, and if you want to 
make some money quick » 

Write Us for Terms to Agents, 

Giving name of township and county wanted. Please note that we 
do not reserve territory in any other way. 

The book, in cloth binding, sells for Si. 25; morocco, S2.0O. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, Illinois. 



To Advertise... 



Judiciousl}' is an art, and many make a failure 
because the}' lack knowledg-e. Advertisers will 
be helped by our advertising experts, in secur- 
ingr the best possible results. 



xhe: ingl-Enook. 



THE COLONY 



A CONSTIPATION CURE THAT 

ACTUALLY CURES. 



...ON. 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



...IN THE. 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BKtTHKtN OAK GROVE CHUKCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
F. Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of igoi 
and were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 

1902, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19, 1902, a Brethren church was organized with a membership of 13. 
There are now 54 members. 

May II, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8, 

1903, the building shown above was completed and on July 12, 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by fort}' in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
they will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
ister is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all, 
is here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies of Cali- 
fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
forty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
day in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
newspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

sit 13 Hention the INGLENOOE when writing. 



Is Vernal Saw Palmetto Berry 
Wine. It is not merely a relief. 
It permanently cures any kind of 
a case of constipation, no matter 
of how long standing, it is not 
a purgative nor an irritant ca- 
thartic. These simply lash and 
hurt the bowels, and bring but 
temporary relief. The condition 
left behind is worse than the first. 
Vernal Saiw Palmetto Berr>- \Vine 
does just the opposite. It is a 
tonic laxative of the highest or- 
der. It tones, strengthens and 
gives new life and vigor to the 
bowels. Only one small dose a 
day removes all the causes of the 
trouble, and leaves the bowels 
well and able to move themselves 
without the aid of medicines. It 
cures dyspepsia, kidney and liver 
troubles, indigestion, headaches, 
catarrh of the stomach, and , all 
other diseases and conditions 
growing out of a clogged condi- 
tion of the system. Try it free. 
A sample bottle for the asking. 
Vernal Remedy Co., 115 Seneca 
Building, Bufifalo, N. Y. 

Sold by all leading druggists. " 

ftlenni>n Hie IN<';LEN<»pK Mhen writing. 




WHY SO SURE? 

It's made on the right plan, 
it worlis right. It brings best 
results to the beginner as well 
.TS the experienced poultry 
raiser. THE 

Successful 

is the nearest of all the out and out automatic 
machines, both Incubator 
and Brooder. They can be 
depended upon under all 
conditions to hatch the most 
and brood them the best. All 
1 eastern orders have promri 
^^ shipment from Buffalo, lOO 
z.r^L^-::^— — i^ pens of standard fowls. In- 
cubator Catalog free. withPoultry Calaloy 10c. 
Des Moines Incubalor Co. Dep 441, Des Moines, la. 




- Mention the INGLKTs'OOK when wTiting. 



Incubators. 

30 Days Trial 

Johnson's Old Trusty. 

CaUfomia Red AVood Cases. 
New oil saving-, perfect reg- 
ulating heating system. A 
five year guarantee with every machine. 
Write to Johnson, the incubator man, and find 
out about the Great $10.00 Special Offer, 

New catalogue with et'p, poultry and ineubfttion 
records. Keep hnnka with the hena. Plenty "I 
book8- They're frei- Quick shlpmenla a ftpeclaily. 

M. M. JOHNSON. Clay Center, W«b. 




Alention tne lAULENUUK ^vhen wnting. 



Albaugfh Bros., Dover & Co,, 



333-335 Dearborn St., "That's the Place." 



CHrCAQO. ILL. 




THE TRIO STEEL RANGE 



With Reservoir 
Only. 




Complete with high shelf warming closet and 
deep porcelain lined reservoir ex- 
actly as illustrated. 
No. of Range. Size of Oven. Price. 

16— 8 in. [ids 16x14x21 $26.60 

i8— 8 or 9 in. lids 18x14x21 28.20 

20— 8 or g in, Hdi 20x14x21 29.40 



The highest grade, black enameled, nickel - 
trimmed steel range possible to produce. Im = 
proved in all points of construction. Far sur- 
passing any other range ever offered. 

THE TKIO for 1Q03-4 offered clit*a|»er tlirtii ever Uefore. 
THK BODY OF THK K.ANGK is better braced, 
closer riveted and better fitting ih^n any other range on the 
market. Tbi(» cH>ll^trtl<-tioIl bas never been 
qiialed in tbe uianiiraetnre oT steel ranges. 
THK FIKE-KOX. equipped with a duplex 
grate for coal or wood, is of correct propor- 
tions for all kinds of fuel ard isarranged to sup- 
ply all tbe beat possible froui tbe quantity 
of fuel used. The perfect system of dampers 
produces a good draft and insures entire satis- 
action with hard or soft coal or wood. 

THE TOP is of lieavy cast iron, which is 
he most durable tliat can be made. All castings 
are < ircle-braced which prevents absolutely any warp- 
ins or sagging. All covers and centers are interchange- 
able so that the same range may have eight or nine inch lids. 

THE OVEN DOOK opens downward and is made of steel with malleable iron frame, It has a coun- 
ter oalanced weight attached, so that it is easily handled. 

IN GENERAL, the range is made to meet every requirement and we offer it with confidence 
tbat it will conti'iie ti> meet popular favor. It is liued witb asbestos tbrougliout, thus 
forcing the heat to the oven, making the range a quick beater, a sure baker, with a saving of one- 
half the fuel used in iitber ranpes. It is made in three sizes and will be shipped direct to you from 
the factory upon receipt of your order. We have handled this range for over two years and we know 
it will give satisfaction, so you are not experimenting or being experimented upon when you place 



Range With Keservoir Only. 



No. of Range. 
i6-8-in. lids 
i8~8 org in. lids 
20—8 or g in. lids 



Size of Oven. 
16x14x21 

l8.\l4X2I 

20x14x21 



Price 

$24.40 

25.20 

26.40 



your order with us. 



mm. 

I a E is! I fii y fsl R 1^ t % ! 




Complete 

Set of 

Table 

Silverware, 

$2.55 



*.i7 l^lKcEft— 6 knives. (J forks, 6 
tablespoons, 6 teaspoons, 1 butter kuife, 1 
.sugar shell. 1 picklefork, of the ROGERS' 
STERLING BRAND, finest coin silver 
plate, in a fine, satin-lined, brocaded 
velvet case, exactly as shown in the small 
Illustration. This offer is genuine, and we 
guarantee satisfaction absolutely, and will re- 
torn your money if you do not find the goods 
exactly as represented. Over 200 of these 
sets now in use in 'Nookers' homes, and all 
giving satisfaction. The set weighs about 7 
pounds and will be shipped by express on re- 
ceipt of $2.66 from rea ders of the Inglenook. 

Alarm Clock that Does Alarm! 

The accom^^anyingeut 
is a small illustration 
of our Parlor Alarua 
Clock. This beauti- 
ful clock is made 
with a cast iron case, 
guu metal finish, and 
has scroll ornamen- 
tation, as shown in the 
illustration. The 
alarm bell is skillfully 
concealed in the base 
of the clock and has an 
extrenaely long and 
* loud ring. making it a 
sure aivakener. 
The movement is the very best and is guaran- 
teed for two years. Will run thirty hours 
without winding. If you forget to wind it at 
night it will be running the next morning. It is 
itust proof and practically indestructible. 
It is fully worth five ordinary alarms, being the 
most durable and substantial everotfered. 
SH inches high, weighs y^ pounds, and 0t AA 
will be shipped by express upon receipt of ^l»vv 



Alaminnm Salt & Pepper Shaker. 





Two pieces, each 2]4 inches 
high, iN inches in diameter, ex- 
actly as shuwn In the illustration, 
luade of solid aliimintim, 
satin finish and polished, sim- 
ilar in appearance to sterling sil- 
ver. Fitted with bevel tops, 
which are alw«ys secure, yet 
easily removed for filling. Use- 
ful and ornamental. Our spe- 
cial offer to Nook readers. One 
set sent postpaid with our ^Ay^ 
catalogue for «vV 



The Unique Umbrella 

It never w^ears out. It is the only umbrella 
that can be quickly repaired w^ithout 
tools and a broken rib can be replaced in five 
minutes and the cover 
can be replaced in 
three minutes. There 
is not a part of this um- 
brella that cannot be re- 
moved and replaced 
without tools except the 
handle from the rod 
which is inserted very 
^ ^- pr- \} Strongly and will never 

C^^^ ^. need to be repaired. It 

is equipped with a wind catch and spring 
lock which makes it impossiblfe (or the umbrel- 
la to blow inside out. The working parts are 
made of brass so that it does not rust or break. 
It costs no more than an ordinary umbrel- 
la and will last a lifetime. We guarantee ab- 
solutely that this umbrella can be taken all 
apart in five minutes time without the aid of 
tools and that it can be put back together again 
in the same lengtli of time, and it is stronger than 
the ordinary kind. If at the end of one week's 
trial you do not find the umbrella exactly as 
represented you may return it to us at our ex- 
pense and we will refund the money. We make 
this liberal offer, lor we have perfect confic'ence 
in the umbrella, and know that when you once 
test it you will never use the old style. 

To the readers of the Inglenook we offer it in 
two grades— No. S7o. black mercerized cotton 
cover, at $1.00 each; No. 700, black waterproof 
cover, will withstand the heaviest storm, $1.48. 





A-34, 



Special Chair Offer 

A fine Cobbler Seat 

Rocker for thesitting room 
or parlor use. just as shown 
in the illustration. Has a 
richly carvetl back and is 
just right for comfort, 
Anns are large and properly 
shaped. Well braced 
throughout and will last for 
years. A bargain at our 
price. Golden elm 
finish. A-34.. 



$2.57 





A-3G. 




A handsomeSaddle Wood 
.Seat Rocker, with a finely 
polished, plain, medium- 
height back, broa«l, roomy 
seat. Arms are strongly 
braced. You will surely be 
pleased with it when you 
see it. Mahogany M C^ 
finish gloss. A 3;. V"»vl 

One of the best made 
^rockers on the market. 

Made in either cobbler or 
saddle wood seat Golden 
oak or mahogany finish. 
It is exceedingly com- 
fortable and also very orna- 
mental. Just a littlecarviog 
on the back. At our price is 
the best value ever d*2 OC 
offered. A-36 90,0V 

A handsome rocker for 
the parlor. Just the thing 
for a Christmas present. 
Has a shaped saddle ve- 
neer wood seat and the 
back is beautifully carv- 
ed, all highly polished. 
May he had in either golden 
uak or mahogany 0A CC 
finish gloss. A-.V V*»«'«' 



AlNSLtMSOKL 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




Indians Picking Cotton in Oklahoma. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



January 1 2, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 2, Volume VI 



the: ingleinook. 



CHEAP RATES 



YOUR NAME 



ON 



Household Goods and 

Personal Effects 



On a U. S. postal card and addressed to us will briny; vou 

FREE samples of 



TO AND FROM 



Colorado, California, Washington, 
Oregon, Utah, 

And All Principal Points West 



Through cars from Chicago with- 
out transfer or rehandling of goods 
en route. Write for rates. Map 
of California free on application. 
If not interested, kindly mention 
to friends who are.^:^^:^ — 

Trans=Continental Freight Co., 

325 Dearborn Street, Ctiicago. 

36 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

506 So. Broadway, Los Angeles. 

i5tl3 Menlion the IXOLENOOK when writing. 



Howell County, So. Missouri 

Is the country of to-day for the honieseeker. The 
best plaee in the U. S. for a poor man or a man 
of moderate means to get a start in life. It is a 
rolling, timbered country and no prairie. There 
are few spots in the U. S. that have better cli- 
mate—short winters, and summers not so hot as 
in the Northern States. The products are corn, 
wheat, oats, rye, timothy, clover and every- 
thing that can be raised in' this latitude. It is 
also one of the coming fruit countries of the 
U. S. West Plains, the county seat, is a good, 
live town of 3,500 people, located on the main 
line of the Frisco R. R. We have lands for sale 
ranging in price to suit everyone. Would you, 
kind reader, like to have a home in this favored 
country? No malaria, etc. No colored people. 
We have just located a few Brethren people 
here and want more We want every reader of 
this paper to write us for our pamphlet. The 
Homescekers' Review, land list and map of the 
country. Bank and other references furnished. 
.Address at once: 

SIMMONS & EPPS, 

West Plains. Mo. 

= 2-[ ; Mention the IXGLt.SOOK when writing. 



Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



Which are purely vegetable in composition and which work 
marvels in curing all diseases of the Stomach, Liver. Kid- 
neys, Bladder, Blood and Constipation. 

Don't fail to write to-day for free samples and circulars. 

Address: 

ALO=ETTA REMEDY COMPANY, Minneapolis, Minn. 

i:j 13 Mention the INCLENOOK ulieii writing. 



BETTER THAN A PHVSICAL CULTURE CLUB." 



THE FA/V\OUS 

As Practiced by 
DR. P. D. FAHRNEV. 



VICTOR METHOD 



.OF.. 



SYSTEM BUILDING 



Send 10 Cents for a 5 Days' Treatment of 



BRAWNTAWNS 



TONIC 
TRIANGULAR TABLETS. 



They send new, rich blood coursing through the system and awaken new 
life and energy. Great builders for weak, tired, over-worked constitutinns. 



& ^.r^^^^x^^s^ f] Victor Remedies Co., 

j SY.STEM BUILDING. : : : [ r^ j . i »« j 

},... .^ Frederick, Md. 



48110 



Mention the INflLENonK when writing. 



** » ' ^* ^ * *I* * $ *^$*^' 'I* ' I * ' » ' ' * ' ' » **$** ♦ ' ' t ' ' I ' ' I * ' I ' ' I ' ' I * *t* * ♦ * *t* ^ * ♦ * *t* * I * *S* * I * ' I * ' ^ 

BOOKS! BOOKS!! 



Do you want a list of good books? If so, drop us 
a postal card, asking for our new catalogue. It is 
sent free to any one for the asking. 

If you want to purchase a birthday present or 
gift for any one, a book is always acceptable. 

Address, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
22 and 24 S. State St., Elgin, 111. 

r V 'V 'I' "f" j"I* 'f"j"J' V v V *s 



» vj*^ *$» *I> ^ * I **2*^*$*^ ' t " * I * ' t " ^ 



e 




i^lB 


■ 


m 






^ 


^ 




Z^ 




1 


Biblc 


IfBLC 8I8l£ 


Bieix^ 




1 

wu..t 

1 


11 

VOLS VOLBI 

•■ti»il«ilAe<"H«,THC*-COfc 

n 


1 

voluc 








Miserable all the Time! 



That is the way a man described his feelings. How 
many more are there not who feel the same way ! A 
careful observer has estimated that nine out of ten 
people are not really well. Something is wrong all 
the time. Nobody wants to be sick just for the fun of 
it, and nearly everybody tries one thing and another in 
the vain hope that it will cure him ; but in most cases 
he finds himself no better for the trial. 

There is no good reason why such people cannot be 
cured if they go about it in the right way. But what 
is the right way?»some one will ask! The only per- 
manent and satisfactory remedy for most of the trou- 
bles of mankind is that which will invigorate and 
strengthen the entire system. 

This can only be done by getting at the cause of the 
trouble, ■ the impure or weakened condition of the 
blood. No one whose blood is pure and vigorous can 
be sick. In this way we are able to assist nature in 
restoring the natural condition. When the blood has 
been cleansed and strengthened, disease cannot re- 
main. There are many good medicines, let us hope, 
for this purpose, but the one that has been especially 
successful is DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER. 
Over a century's constant use has demonstarted its 
power. 

SAYS IT DID WONDERS. 

St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 2ist, 1903. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I should like to become an agent for your 
Blood Vitalizer. I know I can sell a great deal among 
m}' friends and relatives. Let me know how to become 
an agent and I shall send you an order right away. Your 
Blood Vitalizer has simply done wonders for me. It has 
cured me of a stomach trouble with which I have been 
suffering for over six years. No doctor nor any medicine 
I have tried has helped me. I was bedfast weeks at a 
time. This disease seems to lie in our family and I want 
all of them to use it. 

Please let me hear from you. Very gratefully, 

6141 Ella Ave. Mrs. H. Herr. 

A BLESSING TO MANY. 

Apple Creek, Ohio, July 2nd, 1903. 
Dr. P. Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I have to acknowledge that your Blood Vi- 
talizer has proved to be a blessing to many. This is 
especially the case in our own family. We knew nothing 
about your Blood Vitalizer when our family was small, 
six in number. One winter we were all sick, but since 
keeping the Blood Vitalizer we have had no sickness in 
the house, although we are now eleven. We would nev- 
er want to be without it in the house. 



With heartfelt appreciation and many friendly greet- 
ings, I remain Very truly yours, 

Peter Schmid. 

CURED A SCROFULOUS ERUPTION. 

Rockville, Conn., Dec. 27. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — Quite a while ago, I guess about 25 years, 
when I was still in Germany, I was taken sick and a 
scrofulous eruption broke out on my hands and the upper 
part of my body. I got so bad I was unable to follow 
my occupation of weaver. I tried doctors and medicines 
without end but nothing helped me. When I came to 
America, I saw an article in a paper about your Blood 
Vitalizer and made up my mind to try it, which I did. 
As my ailment was old and long standing it took some 
time before I noticed any improvement, but I kept on- 
taking the Blood Vitalizer. Finally I saw I was getting 
better and in time I was completely cured. I am to-day 
entirely 'well. I would not think of being without your 
Blood Vitalizer in the family. Since keeping it on hand 
we have escaped sickness, for which I thank God. 

Yours truly, 

72 Grand Ave. Wm. Drechsler. 

A MERCHANT WRITES. 

Le Mars, Iowa, April i6th, '03. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — Permit me to send you the happy message 
that my wife who has doctored for years and tried all 
kinds of medicines without avail is cured through the use 
of your Blood Vitalizer. It has brought a complete 
change in her. She is now so jolly and full of life, it does 
one good to see her. I am glad she is well at last and 
able to enjoy life. She is only sorry that she did not use 
your remarkable medicine sooner. I could tell you other 
wonders about your medicine. 

With deepest respect. Yours truly, 

Sixth St. Paul Neubel. General Merchant. 

The writer of one of the above letters of testi- 
monial, in referring to his wife and her cure through 
the use of DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER, 
says : " She is now so jolly and full of life that it 
does one good to see her." That is just as it should 
be. It is natural enough. When health returns there 
is no room for gloom and sadness. DR. PETER'S 
BLOOD VITALIZER has brought sunshine into 
many a home by relieving suffering and curing dis- 
ease. 

Unlike other medicines, it is not to be had in drug- 
stores, but is supplied by special agents. For fur- 
ther particulars address the sole proprietor. 



OR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, III. 






The Brethren Church 



AT 



STERLING, COLORADO, 
I Was Dedicated Sunday, November 8th, 1903. 

THE MISSIONARY AND TRACT COMMITTEE 

Have Just Purchased 

Two of Our Irrigated Farms Near Sterling. 

#-- WE HAVE SOLD -S 

V, Thousands of acres to the Brethren during the past 18 months, and are 
V, now corresponding with hundreds of members in various States who have 
become interested in THE GREAT SOUTH PLATTE VALLEY, COLO. 

IF you want to know something about the countr}' that everybody is 
talking about at present, where land produces big crop*, and sure 
crops, where the people are healthy, prosperous and enterprising, and are 
ready and willing to give you a hearty welcome to locate with them, 

WRITE US FOR FREE ADVERTISING MATTER 
AND GENERAL INFORMATION. 

The Colorado Colony Company, 

STERLING, COLORADO. 



«•»- 



■HI 



INGL-EINOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING 



•CALIFORNIA... 



Lordsburg, the Laguna De Tache 
Grant, Tropico 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Utali 
and California Points. 



READ THIS. 



" I bought two years ago three acres unimproved and 
without water right, in Tropico, built a six-room cottage, 
and made other improvements, so that the whole cost me 
about $i,8oo. I sold at $1,200 per acre. Made in the op- 
eration $1,800. There are yet some chances here for those 
who will believe and go to work." M. M. Eshelman. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri River 
to all principal points West. Business men and others can 
save many hours via this line. Call on or address a postal 
card to your nearest ticket agent, or 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



STERLING, COLO., 

Well Adapted for B^et Sugar Factory. 



This year has marked the establishment of the sugar 
beet industry upon a large and substantial basis. In 
1902 the Chamber of Commerce fostered the new pur- 
suit by having twenty acres planted to sugar beets, 
such satisfactory results being secured from this experi- 
mental field that arrangements for the erection of a 
sugar factory were taken up and gratifying progress 
has befen made. Under contract for delivery to estab- 
lished factories at a distance, the people of this county 
are growing 3,000 acres of sugar beets this year. 

Pay Roll $1,000 A Day. 

Citizens of Logan county are not boasting of what 
they can do or have done, but the pay roll to laborers 
engaged in cultivation of our beet crop has reached a 
total of $1,000 per day for many days. Growing of this 
crop has afforded employment for all persons who 
could work and desired to do so. The usual street 
game of marbles has lost its supporters, and the youth- 
ful population of from ten to fourteen years of age is 
earnestly assisting in the care and cultivation of the 
crop, earning $1.50 to $2.00 per day. Many of the Ster- 
ling boys have bank accounts ranging from $15 to $50. 
Aside from the financial benefit accruing from this la- 
bor it should be remembered that the boy who learns to 
till the soil is making a practical study of the founda- 
tion upon which all national government must rest, and 
what is more, especially the base for the commerce of 
the world. No nobler work can be performed than as- 
sisting Nature to supply the wants of the human family. 

Sterling is the seat of Logan county, located on the 
South Platte river and on the Union Pacific railroad. 
It is destined to remain the metropolis of northeastern 
Colorado. With 100,000 acres of the highest type of 
agricultural lands surrounding and under a perfect sys- 
tem of irrigation established in 1870, a third of a cen- 
tury ago. Sterling is possessed of the necessary condi- 
tions to become a city of 10,000 population. Enterprise 
and thrift of our citizens have required that in all things 
municipal the city shall be fully abreast of the times. 
There is now in course of construction one of the most 
perfect systems of waterworks in the commonwealth. 
Pure water from the wonderful Springdale springs is 
being pumped a distance of six miles to supply the 
needs of the city. 

In recognition of the substantial growth made in the 
county the railroad has erected a handsome passenger 
station at Sterling, costing $20,000. Many substantial 
business blocks have recently been built by local capi- 
talists who have unbounded faith in the future of the 
South Platte valley. School facilities are not inferior 
to those of any locality in the State. A new school 
building has just been completed for the intermediate 
grades at a cost of $20,000 and our high school ranks 
with those of other cities of the State. The moral and 
spiritual welfare of our people is splendidly provided 
for by eight church organizations, having six houses 
of worship. The Presbyterians, Methodist Episcopal, 
Baptist, Dunker Brethren, German Evangelical and 
Catholic are the denominations having church build- 
ings. — Ranche News, Denver, Colo. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Sterling, Colorado, 

nvrr CADE P'"* $2.00, for the Round Trip First 
line rAIlC and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



ill 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



» ■~v A ¥ W ^~V is the best-watered arid Statt in America. Brethren are moving there because hot winds, 
I I W r\ I M V-/ destrnctive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate it makes life 
bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler and if you have in mind a change 
for the general improveme«t in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, 
we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that 
ii, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to answer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad tares to 
investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see for yoar- 
aelf. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 

Settlers' One=way Rates from March 1 to April 30, 1904. 

FROM To Pocatello, Huntington, 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa. etc. 

Chicago S30 00 g30 50 

St. Louis 26 00 27 50 

Peoria 28 00 ' 28 50 

Kansas City and Omaha 20 00 22 50 

Sioux City 22 90 ' 25 40 

St. Paul and Minneapolis, .* 22 99 25 40 




MODEL RANCH, IDAHO. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. 



Fine 



Nampa, Idaho. 
I came to Idaho two years ago from the best part of eastern Kansas. 1 had done no work for a year oa ac- 
count of poor health. One year here brought me all right and this year I farmed and made more money from 
80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my potatoes were ahead, making 600 
bushels per acre. Joshua Ja.\ies. 



S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. H. QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



D. E. BURLEY, 

G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R„ 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



II 



Uention the INULFNOOK wlieii writin«. 



1 



U iCbENOOK 



Vol. VI, 



January 12, 1904. 



No. 2. 



THE INEVITABLE WORD. 



Wliat finding sense, what instinct sure, 
Informed the master sons of rhyme? 

What magic made their words endure 
Above the noise and dust of time? 

Through stately speech and thrilling song 

Their words inevitably leap. 
As countless springs to one stream throng 

And in communion onward sweep. 

The bold for long may strive to match 
The world's long-tested, singing lines. 

And yet a careless tavern catch 
Among their best unrivaled shines! 

And scholars grave, with studious care, 
O'erlook what untaught men have found 

Beside the common thoroughfare 
In harsh, untilled, forbidden ground. 

Alert and strong the martial thought 

In marching cadence wheels and climbs. 

And hymns of faith, but crudely wrought, 
Ring in the heart their deathless chimes. 

And whether chance appoint the way. 

Or skill direct and guide the pen. 
The laurel's won if men shall say, 

"Thought need not trace this path again! 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



Things not worth keeping are not zvorfh looking at. 



A boy's troubles are ahvays the fault of the other 



boy. 



There are lots of points of character about a porcu- 
pine. 

* 

Real strength of character is best brought out by 
adversity. 

Solomon zuas a very zvise man but he was hopeless- 
ly married. 

* 

When a boy gets on his good behavior he tempts 
providence. And the providence of boys is frail and 
prone to yield. 



We admire most in others zvhat zve have the least 
of ourselves. v 

Lots of people regard a church certificate as a sleep- 
ing -car ticket. 

♦ 

You cannot pray to your Father and also prey 
on your brother. 

Good women make more men Christians than the 
dezil makes sinners. 

In Boyville it is a shamefid thing to flaunt the 
secrets of the heart. 

* 

How often we look at the other fellozv zvorking and 
think how easy it is. 

♦ 

A4an should have business with religion and have 
religion in his business. 

Cupid probably got his defective vision from his 
mother's side of the house. 

There is no 'sanctity or holiness zvorthy the name 
that is not backed by sense. 

Trickery in politics is not " good politics " as some 
men would have you believe. 

No, sister, it isn't that everybody misunderstands 
you. Likely ifs your stomach. 

♦ 
There never was an orchestra composed of people 
zvho did not blow their own horns. 



Treat your wife as you did in your courting days 
if you woidd still have her for a sweetheart. 

* 

We can always find excuses readily for not doing 
those things for which there should be no excuse 
whatever. 



26 



the: ingleinook. 



EAR PORTRAITS THE LATEST TRAP FOR EVIL 
DOERS. 



" Le portrait parle et ecrit," the descriptive por- 
trait, is the latest trap, with which the police of 
Paris have beset the way of evil doers. 

The " portrait park " is an attempt to record ac- 
curately the minutiae of the unchanging features 
in terms that speak more quickly to the eye than 
so many centimeters. So many changing features 
are recorded by the photograph that a lapse of a 
decade makes it valueless. But the length, outline, 
angle, breadth of the nose, the size, shape, sinu- 
osities of the ear, remain the same from decade to 
decade. The " portrait parle "' describes these. 
Briefly and accurately as words may, facilitated in 
this regard by a slang of its own, it registers the 
breadth of the rim of the ear and the shape and 
size of the lobe. In the same way every detail of 
the nose and eyes is described. Only an exten- 
sive surgical remodeling could put a man beyond 
identification with the "portrait parle." lie may 
not dye his hair and grow a beard and so become 
a new man. 

For the nose, for example, the police examine 
separately the shape and the size. In a profile view 
of the nose there are two lines, the " dos " or 
bridge, and the " base," the line from the tip of 
the nose to the point where it joins the upper lip. 
Few persons describing a face would think of that 
line, and yet it aiTects the form of the nose as 
much as does the shape of the bridge. 

The ear is of course more complicated than the 
nose, and offers greater opportunities for the " por- 
trait parle." In. fact, the French scientists assert 
that there are enough to go around among a large 
part of the human race without much chance of 
duplication. The ear, moreover, is one of the fea- 
tures that never change in shape from youth to 
old age. 

Those who are skilled in it, as the French police, 
can make in a few moments singularly accurate 
notes of the features of a person before them. 
Armed with this description they have no difficulty 
in identifying the same person whenever seen again. 
Error is impossible, so it is said, though the error 
of the police partakes somewhat of the nature of 
the errors of physicians. At any rate, it is said 
that innumerable experiences have shown that with 
the " portrait parle " it is impossible to arrest an 
innocent person because of supposed resemblance 
to a guilty one. 

The security of the righteous cannot better be 
shown than by this little fable of the prefecture. 
Among the 200,000 portraits and anthropometric 
descriptions preserved in the bureau of identifica- 



tion only two men were found to resemble each 
other closel3^ They were twins. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
MAN'S WONDERFUL NASAL ORGAN. 



Scientists and travelers tell us that one of the 
first changes that occur in a man who lives an ab- 
solutely natural life for a few months is an extra- 
ordinary intensification of the sense of smell. 

Describing his meeting with Mr. Jackson in the 
wilds of Franz Josef Land, Dr. Nansen tells how 
he first discovered his nearness to' the English ex- 
plorer by the scent of a fragment of soap which 
the latter had used that morning. His companion, 
Johansen, noticed the scent also. " As I ap- 
proached Jackson's hut," says the great Swedish 
explorer, " I thought I could smell everything it 
contained and give a sort of inventory oi its stores 
without en4;ering." 

But even then the doctor's sense of smell could not 
be compared with that of the real savage. The 
Peruvian Indians, walking at night in the darkness 
of the thick forests which line the lower spurs of 
the Andes, can distinguish, respectively, by the 
smell alone, between a white man, a negro or one 
of their own race. 

Few people realize how very closely connected 
are the senses of taste and smell. A-Iany of the 
substances which we say taste good are not tasted 
at all, but gratify us by their appeal to the sense 
of smell. All meats, wines and fruits, for instance, 
are smelt rather than tasted. This is easily proved 
by the fact that a bad cold almost destroys our 
appreciation of any of these classes of foods or 
drinks. On the other hand, however bad a cold 
one may be afflicted with, one does not lose one's 
taste for sugar, salt or quinine. These substances 
have no smell, but appeal directly to the sense of 
taste. 

If one of them be placed on the tongue the sensa- 
tion of sweetness, saltness or bitterness is at once 
experienced. It is, however, worth noting that all 
these substances must be dissolved in water, or 
by the moisture of the mouth, before they give any 
sensation of taste. 

If you put a grain or two of sugar into your 
mouth and allow it. to dissolve slowly its taste is 
only faintly perceptible. If, on the contrarj^ you 
rub the dissolving sugar into the palate by mov- 
ing the tongue, the taste is greatly intensified. 
Sugar appeals to the mucous membrane of a large 
portion of the mouth, as also does salt. This is 
why one smacks one's lips in endeavoring to fully 
appreciate a novel taste. 

Just as different parts of our brain are the seats 
of various mental powers, so various portions of 
the mouth receive difi^erent kinds of tastes. Sugar 



the: INGL-EINOOK. 



27 



and kindred substances, and also purely acid foods 
or drinks appeal to the tip of the tongue and the 
front part of the mouth. That is why one gets 
more enjoyment from wine by sipping it. 

Smell is a far more delicate sense than taste. 
As already mentioned, most substances must be 
moistened before appealing to taste. But in order 
to smell a substance it must be in the form of 
vapor. If eau de cologne be poured into the nose 
it gives rise to no sense of odor whatsoever. Yet 
we all know how powerful is the sensation of smell 
produced when the little particles, constantly dis- 
engaging themselves from its surface, are borne by 



than women. Experiments to prove this were made 
by Professors Nicholls and Browne. Three of the 
men could detect prussic acid in a solution com- 
posed of 2,000,000 parts of water and one of acid, 
but not one of the women could detect the scent 
of the prussic acid when the solution was weaker 
than the one part in ;o,ooo of water. 

ICE IN JERUSALEM. 



Jerus.\lem, the " city of peace," and " stronghold 
of Zion," is at least 3800 years old, yet only three years 
;'go did the natives of the part of Palestine begin tc 




OKLAHOMA TIMBER. 



the air to the olfactory nerves. The nose is fitted 
to perceive sensations from particles of almost in- 
conceivable smallness. A single grain of musk will 
scent a room for years, and as this result can only 
be produced by continual loss of particles of its 
substances these particles must be tiny beyond the 
reach of imagination. 

The smelling region of the nose lies in its upper 
part. The nose has three regions, and it is in the 
third that the seat of the sense is concentrated. 
The mucous membrane of the nose at this point 
is much thicker than below, and is not red but 
colored with a brown pigment. 

Afen are possessed of more acute powers of smelf 



use ice. Many of them had never seen it, in fact. A 
diminutive French plant has been turning out about 
700 pounds a day. Jerusalem water is the finest in the 
world, being collected from the housetops and stored 
in cisterns. The ice, therefore, is like crystal, melting 
slowly and without a particle of sediment. The de- 
mand for ice in the sacred city was started by a modern 
hospital. Hotels soon afterward began its use, and 
now nearl}' all the foreign residents and many of the 
wealth}- native families are consumers. No natural 
ice is brought into Syria. 

♦♦, ♦*♦ A 

V *♦* V 

Cultivate simplicity in testimony ; do not strain at 
eloquence. — .1/. D. Carrel. 



the: ingl-Einook. 



THE CHICAGO FIRE. 



On the afternoon of Dec. 30 occurred the worst 
horror in Chicago that the great city ever experienced. 
The new theater, the Iroquois, was playing in an after- 
noon matinee to a crowded house. The building 
caught fire and hundreds lost their lives. 

This theater has been recently built and is said to 
be one of the finest and best equipped in the world. 
It was supposed to be absolutely unburnable and there 
were twenty-five different exits. It is said to be the 
first play that had been put on in the new building 
and that the house was filled from the top to the bot- 
tom with people when the tragedy took place. Nobody 
will ever know just how the fire happened, but it is 
said that it was caused by electric wires becoming 
crossed, and it is certain that the flames started on the 
stage. 

In all well-conducted theaters there is an asbestos 
curtain that can be let down in front of the stage and 
that cuts off the fire from the body of the theater. 
Like the unexpected, which mostly happens, this cur- 
tain was let down to within ten or twelve feet of the 
floor of the stage. A draft was created, and the flames 
and the smoke were blown directly out into the audi- 
ence. 

Then the people lost their heads and started in a mad 
scramble for the outside. They simply went mad. 
Those on the bottom floor succeeded in getting out 
without much trouble. Those up in the balconies and 
galleries dashed for the exit and filled up on 
top of each other to the top of the doors. Those 
who were behind in the crowd trampled on those 
in front and persons to the number of about six 
hundred died a horrible death, either from injuries re- 
ceived in the scramble or they were suft'ocated in the 
smoke or burned in the fire that raged in a few 
minutes. 

The whole interior of the theater was a seething, 
boiling urn of fire. People crowded out on the fire 
escapes which also refused to work, and had to remain 
there, unable to descend, because the flames came out 
of the windows preventing their escape. A few fell, 
some jumped, and many were rescued by means of a 
plank laid across from an adjoining house roof. Wa- 
ter from the engines was thrown upon these people, 
clinging to the fire escapes, to keep them from burn- 
ing alive. Within the building about six hundred 
people died a miserable death. About six hundred are 
known at this writing to have actually burned, and a 
good many more died of injuries. 

It makes one of the worst disasters the world has 
ever seen, and will bring gloofn and sorrow into many 
a household. A number of people from Elgin were in 
the fire, some of whom escaped and some were burned. 
The Clerk of the Circuit Court and his wife were 



burned to death. Subscribers to the Inglenook were 
in the building but escaped with slight burns. 

The mass of people wedged in at the doors along the 
stairway were so inexplicably mixed up that they could 
not be separated without pulling them apart member 
by member. The rescuers walked over the pile of the 
dead and began to pass them out over the top. They 
were taken to the nearest stores and other public 
places and laid out like cordwood. Thompson's res- 
taurant, near by, was stripped of its furnishings and 
the dead and d3'ing covered every table. 

Thousands of people stood outside in the streets 
utterly unable to help those within. One man, a read- 
er of the Inglenook, saw a woman on the fifth floor 
take a header to the earth, turn over two or three 
times, striking a wire on the way down, when she 
was caught by willing hands below. It is not known 
whether she was dead or alive. The people below 
wrung their hands, cried, raved, or swore as they were 
differently constituted. The greater part of a thou- 
sand people were being roasted before their eyes and 
they were utterly tmable to do a single thing in the 
way of helping them. Days afterward it was un- 
certain as to who was lost and who was not. Whole 
families of women and children went tct the play, and 
it was not known by the husband and others at home 
whether they were dead or alive. The hospitals and 
morgues had to be sought to ascertain whether or not 
they were victims. 

In regard to this honor it is an absolutely certain 
thing- that not a single life would have been lost if 
people had simply walked out of the theater. They 
lost their heads, and consequently lost their lives. If 
the people there had gone out of the theater as order- 
ly as they file out of church, not a single person 
would have been injured. 

As it was everybody went mad, and fell down, which 
meant death, for those behind swarmed over, to be, 
in turn, themselves trampled upon. 

Nobody could have foreseen the accident and it is 
not likely that there can ever be a public building of 
any character that can be called absolutely fireproof. 
No such building can be erected by man. Once a fire 
gets a start it licks everything before it. Tliose who 
go into a public building, anywhere, jammed into a 
crowd, are simply taking their lives in their hands, 
for a cry of fire will turn an ordinary audience into a 
fighting, shouting, killing mob of madmen. It is one 
of those catastrophes that sometimes overtakes a com- 
munity, for which there is no known remedy as long 
as people will and must assemble in crowds. The city 
of Chicago is shocked into soberness and the day of the 
fire will never be forgotten. 

* 4* ♦ 

Let us be persuaded that nothing is due to us and 
then nothing will disturb us. — Fcnclon. 



the: ingleinook. 



29 



KATYDIDS. CRANBERRIES AND SNAKES. 



Cr.\nberry growers are complaining of the ravages 
of swarms of katydids, which are very destructive to 
the bogs, and there seems no way for the eradication 
of the pest. 'As this is about the only \va}' in which 
the queer insects are destructive, no one ha5 ever sug- 
gested means for their killing. 

The growers are equally anxious to cultivate the 
companionship of all the blacksnakes they can find, and 
they will not permit any one to kill such a snake. The 



wants them to stop. They are utterl\- irresponsive to 
the old words of command, even when shouted at the 
top of their owner's voice. 

♦ •$• ♦ 

CANNOT SPEAK ENGLISH. 



It is not generall}- realized what an immense number 
of Britons born and bred at home never succeeded in 
mastering the national language. In Wales there are 
no fewer than 508,036 people who cannot speak Eng- 
lish, Welsh being their only language: in Scotland 





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\VHE3RE PEACE AND HE.\LTH DO MOST ABOUND. 



reptiles are also very fond of field mice, and as the little 
animals are harmful to the growing crops, the snakes 
are permitted to roam at pleasure over the bogs, while 
some of the growers even suggest sending to other 
sections for a supply. 

*J* ■*$* *5* 

HORSES MADE DEAF BY LIGHTNING. 



A FEW weeks ago the barn of a Walled Lake, Mich., 
farmer was struck by lightning. A team of horses 
were in the building at the time and ever since then 
they have been stone deaf. Their owner is obliged, to 
drive them with open bridles, flourish the whip when 
he wants them to go and pull on the lines when he 



there are 43,738 persons who can speak nothing but 
Gaelic; and in Ireland there are 32,121 who can ex- 
press themselves only in the Irish tongue. 

*> •^ *»* 

The fated steamship "Maine" whose fiendish 
wrecking was the signal for war, the Sumpter of 1898, 
is to be sold for old junk, provided anyone can be 
found to raise her from Havana harbor. The war 
cry: "Remember the 'Maine'" is all but forgot- 
ten — ' so soon forgotten." 

*J* ^ ^ 

The test of a religion is the man or the nation it 
makes. — E. 0. Watson. 



30 



T\-^^ rNGLENOOK. 



A , | . . t i . { i , { , ■ ; ,^.^>^.^>^»{m{^>^«^.^.<.4k.;»^».>^>.^.^^;«<-<«M'^^ ■ ! ■ » • ! • < ■ ■ ! ■ ■ ♦ ' < ■ - t' ■ { '♦^•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦' 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
4 over the country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
" takmg the work up with the current issue. Back numbers caneot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
. ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, III. 



' The bubbling brook doth leap when I come by, 

Because my feet find measure with its call; 
The birds know when the friend they love is nigh, _ 

For I am known to them both great and small; 
The flower that on the lonely hillside grows 

Expects me there when spring its bloom has given; 
And many a tree and bush my wandering knows. 

And e'en the clouds and silent tears of heaven." 

•:• •> 4> 

HOW IT IS DONE. 



Bro. D. L. Miller, who is now in California for 
the winter, writes a letter to the Nature Study De- 
partment of the Inglenook, recalling how he and the 
Nookman sat on the shady lawn in front of the Nook- 
man's home in the East. He says, " I recall how a 
couple half-grown turkeys perched on your knees and 
then finally on your shoulders, one of them pecked at 
your glasses until they fell from your nose. You car- 
ried the candidates for Thanksgiving roasts to their 
roosting place and when you returned we talked about 
being kind to all of God's creatures and how prompt 
they are to recognize a kindness. You told me about 
rabbits and squirrels playing about the lawn all the 
summer months and how they ran through the house 
at their sweet will. Then you invited me to visit your 
pet bumblebees, and I went with some doubt in mind 
as to results, but found the big fellows perfectly docile, 
coming out as you tapped slightly on the nest and 
then going back as if to say, 'Oh it's you, is it?' 
Perhaps your natural history class would be interested 
to know how you did it. Please tell us." 

There is nothing easier to answer than this ques- 
tion, and I am glad that it comes up, because it gives 
me an opportunity to preach a sermon on kindness and 
patience with animals. Living in the country as I did 
at that time, my home was naturally surrounded with 
small folk in fur and feathers and with wings. The se- 
cret of the whole business may be summed up in a few 
words. Nothing was ever scared or hurt, and the result 
was that the entire animal, bird and insect kingdom, 
soon came to know, through some sort of knowledge 
spread abroad among them, that while they were about 
or in the house they were perfectly safe. 

Several nests of squirrels were on the lawn, and it 
was a very common thing for a red squirrel to perch 
on the rope of the hammock in which the writer and 
other members of the family were swinging and swing 



along with the rest of us. They would even venture 
close enough to take a nut from the hand. 

A lot of turkeys that we had on the lawn invariably 
came to rest, first on the Nookman's knee, and then 
on his shoulder, edging close as possible, and would 
not go to bed until they were placed on the roost in 
the tree. They cried like children if this attention was 
not shown them and peeped pitifully until they were 
picked up and put away for the night. 

The wild rabbit hopped around utterly indifferent to 
his surroundings and often did go through the li- 
brary, in at one door and out the other, though it 
never allowed itself to be touched. 

About the bumblebees under the window ! The nest 
was about as big around as an ordinary dinner plate, 
and I frequently went there during the lifetime of 
their nest, and it was a very common thing to strip 
up my sleeve and lay my hand on top of the nest, 
when all of them would come out and crawl over my 
arm and my face until they became perfectly familiar. 
\\'hile they came out every day they soon came to know 
that no harm was meant, and, after satisfying them- 
selves that it was " only him," they would go back 
again or would go about their work without any signs 
of disturbance. 

Now, one reason why this thing is true may be best 
illustrated by the conduct of the people who came to 
the house. Out of five hundred people who might 
come there four hundred and ninety-nine of them, on 
seeing the red squirrel, would instinctively look around 
for a stone to throw at it. Had they had a gun or 
club in their hands they would have shot the dove in 
the cherry tree on the lawn, or broken the back of the 
rabbit. I suppose all of these things are evidences of 
man's being created a " little lower than the angels," 
but ever3'thing that has wings or legs on the sight of 
this angelic person simply gets out of his way as fast as 
it can go. They had learned that of all the enemies of 
animal life that walk the earth or fly in the air, there 
is nothing so needlessl)' and so meanly cruel as the un- 
feathered biped known as a man. Anywhere where 
birds or beasts have not seen a man they pay not the 
slightest attention to him at first, but they soon learn 
that he is a terror and to be avoided, and they get out 
of sight just as quick as they can, and get away from 
him. 

The whole secret of the relation between animals and 



the: ingleinook. 



31 



birds and insects at home consisted in simply never 
hurting them or never scaring them. The trouble did 
not consist in making friends with the birds and beasts 
at home, but in watching the human animal who came 
there, and who could not see one of them without 
wanting to cripple or kill it. This devilishness, for 
that is what it is, is almost inexplicable. Why a grown 
man or woman, supposed to be a Christian, seeing a 
belted bumblebee, exploring a hollyhock, should want 
to take a paddle and smash it, is out of all reason. It 
is simply lust to kill and is to be discouraged at every 
turn. 

Show me a place where ever^'thing in the bird or 
animal way makes off in fright on the sight of people 
and I will show you a lot of people who 
have not learned the great fact of being kind. 
If the Almighty were to deal with us as we 
deal with the smaller creations we would be crippled 
and maimed, and killed in ninety-nine cases out of a 
hundred. It is entirely possible for nearly everybody 
who reads these Hnes to be recognized by birds and 
beasts as he goes about his duties. 

To show how far it may be carried, the writer knows 
of a little girl, or who was a little girl at that time, 
who would go to the water's edge, call the fish, and 
they would come to her in answer to her call. She 
would insert her hand in the water, spreading her 
fingers out, fan-fashion, and the larger ones would 
jostle in an opportunity to take hold of her fingers 
with their mouths. She could show five fish, each 
having hold of a thumb or a finger of her hand under 
the water. Most people would think what a good 
scheme to get hold of them, and kill them, and eat 
them. This never entered the head of the little girl 
and through some unknown and inexplicable means 
of communication the fish seemed to know it. Finally, 
be kind to animals and they will trust you. 
•J, .t. »> 
NAMING FLOWERS. 



eral the jeweled baton indicating his high rank of 

Marshal of France. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

SPRAYING TREES. 



MkS. O. H. Elliot, of Mt. Vernon, Ohio, an esti- 
mable Nooker, writes the editor, taking exception to 
what he says in regard to spraying trees for the pur- 
pose of killing insects. She holds that our feathered 
friends are killed in the operation to an alarming extent, 
and that people should be careful about how they use 
such poisons. There is a great deal of truth in what 
Mrs. Elliot says and no doubt a few birds, many, 
perhaps, fall victims to the poisonous pests spread be- 
fore them. It is also true that bees are killed by 
gathering honey from sprayed trees. The Inglenook 
would be very glad to receive short communications 
on this subject to determine whether or not spraying 
has a bad side as well as a good one. Birds have 
rights as well as man and should be protected. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE SENSE OF SMELL IN INSECTS. 



Flowers are not always named by chance. Take 
the dahlia, that was named after Dahl, a Swedish flor- 
ist and discoverer of the flower. The magnolia, after 
Magnol, a celebrated French botanist. Fuchsia, after 
Ftichs, a distinguished German savant. 

But there is only one instance reported of a man 
and flower receiving a name at the same time. Mare- 
chal Niel, on his return from the Franco-Austrian 
war, received a basket of beautiful yellow roses from 
a peasant woman. One of the stems had a root cling- 
ino- to it, and this the Marechal took to a florist in 
Paris, under whose care it became a thriving bush, 
laden with blossoms. Neil took the rose as a gift to 
the Empress Eugenia, who, on hearing that it was 
nameless, said: " It shall be the Marechal Niel." At 
the same time she bestowed upon the astonished gen- 



There can be no question now but that the sense 
of smell, in some insects, at least, the bee for illus- 
tration, is located in the antennae. As long as insects 
are in possession of their antennae, they are able to find 
any substance, pleasant or offensive, by the sense of 
smell, or what corresponds to the sense of smell with 
us, but if the antenna are cut off these things are found 
with difficulty if they are found at all. 

It seems that the sense of smell in insects is char- 
acteristic of the mating season. If any Nooker should 
hatch out a female insect in a room it is likely that the 
insects without would find a way in in numbers. They 
have been known to come down the stovepipe in order 
to reach the room, but if their antennse are cut off 
they cannot do this. 

♦ ♦ ^* 

"LITTLE DARLING." 



Every reader will know what is meant when he 
speaks of the mignonette. For untold generations in 
poetry and song it has been considered the emblem of 
fidelity. Its delicate, intangible odor is peculiarly 
pleasant to everybody, and in many lands to-day the 
little plant is considered an indispensable household 
treasure. Its inconspicuous little flower, known to 
science as the Resade odorata has, with its fragrance 
won its way into many a heart. 

Most of our readers may not know the meaning of 
the word mignonette. It means " Little darling." 
Now when you pluck a bunch of mignonette for your 
friends you will know what it means whether you 
think it or not. 



32 



the: ingi_e:nook. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF THE AMERICAN 
PHEASANT. 



DY \V. B. HOPKINS. 



The partridge, ruffed grouse, and the pheasant are 
identical, the names referring to the same bird. The 
male has a tuft of feathers of darker color and longer 
than the others, on each side of the neck, which may 
be erected at pleasure and this he will always do when 
surprised. 

This bird has a habit of drumming. This is per- 
formed usually when standing on a log in this man- 
ner. It elevates its wings in a vertical position over 
its back, and then he proceeds to bring the back of his 
wings together with force, at first quite deliberately, 
but increasing in rapidity to the end. 

They subsist on berries, seeds and grains of differ- 
ent kinds, and on the buds of some varieties of trees. 
It is a picturesque sight to see a dozen pheasants in 
a treetop hopping from branch to branch and picking 
off the buds. They seldom go in flocks of more than 
half a dozen, probably what survives of a brood. The 
female lays from ten to fifteen eggs under the roots of 
a fallen tree or in the end of a hollow log. The 
mother will display all the courage and fierceness of 
the barnyard biddy in defending her young. I have 
had them fly against my face, uttering a shrill cry 
when I surprised a brood. 

The pheasant is by no means a tame bird. You can 
approach to within two or three rods of one if he 
thinks you do not see him, and will not fly away. I 
have many times found one in a clump of hazel brush, 
and got perhaps within two rods before I saw it. The 
pheasant would deliberately walk out of the brush 
and walk around so as to keep the brush between it 
and me. On several such occasions I picked up a 
small stick, threw it, and killed the bird. They will 
sometimes, but seldom, follow along a fence inside of 
a field but never at a distance from the fence. They 
will fly across a field from one piece of woods to 
another but never run across. One flew along the 
woods fifteen rods from where I am now writing, and 
lit in the cherry tree across the road opposite. It was 
then five rods from my present position. It sat ten 
minutes and flew back to the woods. 

They have a singular habit of burrowing in the 
snow. I do not think they do this except in very se- 
vere weather. At such times, if there is a foot or fif- 
teen inch snow, they will burrow to the ground and 
remain there through the night. I have many times, 
in going through the -woods, come near stepping on 
them. 

Crystal. Mich. 

Comment. 

The above is a very interesting contribution, and it 
will be observed that the writer thereof tells how the 



pheasant does his drumming. This is contrary to all 
the accepted scientific theories on the subject. The 
pheasant is said, in books, to drum by beating its 
breast with its wings, though, of course, the writer 
may be correct in his statement. A good deal of the 
drumming is done in early spring and is doubtless a 
love note. Will not some of our observant Nookers, 
in the pheasant habitat, watch and see how it really 
is done? 

The habit of " burrowing " is done by the pheas- 
ants taking a pkmging flight from a neighboring tree 
into the loose snow and leaving a round hole where 
it enters, showing two delicate wing scrapes on the top 
of the snow on each side of the hole. It does not 
burrow to the ground but curves upward and is with- 
in a few inches of the surface, where it is warm dur- 
ing the coldest nights. He who is skillful enough to 
understand the possible direction which the bird has 
taken, by spreading out his hands and falling bodily 
into the snow, stands about one chance in three of 
covering up the bird when he can reach through and 
catch it, or it may come out just in front of him, or 
just behind him, or to one side. The pheasant does 
not take a plunge into a hard crust of snow. It knows 

better. 

^ .> .;. 

HOME OF VEGETABLES. 



Potatoes come from far Virginia; 

Parsley was sent us from Sardinia; 

French beans, low growing on the earth. 

To distant India trace their birth; 

But scarlet runners, gay and tall. 

That climb upon your garden wall — 

A cheerful sight to all around — 

In South America were found. 

The onion traveled here from' Spain; 

The leek from Switzerland we gain. 

Garlic from Sicily obtain. 

Spinach in far Syria grows; 

Two hundred years or more 

Brazil the artichoke sent o'er. 

And Southern Europe's sea coast shore 

Beet root on us bestows. 

When 'Lizbeth was reigning here. 

Peas came from Holland, and were dear. 

The south of Europe lays its claim 

To beans, but some from Egypt came. 

The radishes, both thin and stout. 

Natives of China are, no doubt; 

But turnips, carrots, and sea kale. 

With celery, so crisp and pale, 

.\re products of our own fair land, 

.'Knd cabbages, a goodlj' tribe. 

Which abler pens might well de'^cribe. 

.^re also ours, I understand. 

— London Young Folks' Rural. 

4* ■^ <• 

A OUEEN bee hardly, if ever, uses her sting. When 
.she does sting it is with slight effect. The main use 
of a queen bee's sting is to kill a rival queen. 



the: ingleinook. 



33 



THE SKUNK. 



The skunk is a native of North America, and, in 
one form or another is found all the way from the 
Hudson Bay country down to South America. There 
are three kinds of skunks. The long-tailed skunk is 
a native of Central and Southern America. It has 
two white stripes along its sides and a much longer 
and bushier tail than the common one. The' yellow 
striped skunk, found in southern parts of the United 
States and southward tlirough Alexico and Guatemala, 
is the most beautiful of all the skunks. Then, there is 
a skunk of tropical America, ranging from Texas to 
Patagonia, but the common skunk, which we all know 
one way or another, called the Mephitis mcphitica 
in science, is about the size of a cat and is a very 
much abused animal. 

The skunk lives on mice, frogs, salamanders and 
insects generally. Its peculiarity is that of dififering 
largely from other wild animals in its habits. In the 
first place the skunk is not afraid of man. If you 
should run into one when he is shuffling about over the 
country the chances are that he will not run or hide, 
if you do not stone him or hurt him in any way. In- 
deed it has been known that a skunk will come up to a 
person and rub along his legs much as a cat would 
do and evidently without fear and out of pure com- 
radeship. Few people are able to stand that sort of 
thing with composure and the result is that they gen- 
erally get the worst of it. 

The skunk will sometimes eat eggs and raid poultry 
houses, but, in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred, he 
confines himself to insects, of which he must destroy a 
large amount in the course of a year. Except in very 
cold weather he does not hibernate, but rolls up in a 
ball like other animals and waits until the weather mod- 
erates so that he can get out to find a hollow log or one 
that he can strip the bark off and catch the insects 
underneath and eat the bugs. He will destroy more 
beetles and grasshoppers than all other creeping and 
crawling things around the place. Moreover, if you 
let him alone and do not frighten or hurt him he will 
not use his peculiar means of defence. 

Skunks have large families. They have eight to 
ten kittens at a time and these keep the same hole as 
one family throughout the winter and only separate 
when springtime and the mating season begins. The 
remarkable feature about the skunk is his means of 
defence, and this does not require very much ex- 
planation on our part, but it is not generally known, 
perhaps, that near!}' all carnivorous animals have 
glands in embr3'o that the skunk has, but they are 
enormously developed in the case of the skunk, with 
a gizzard-like interior to enable them to act as a 
force-pump and throw the nauseating liquid to a dis- 
tance of eight or ten feet. This is yellowish in color 
and amounts to about a teaspoonful when the gland is 



full. There are two minute openings through which 
this liquid is forced and it is probably too well known 
to need description. 

On a heavy, damp, muggy night it can be smelled 
for perhaps a mile in every direction. A peculiarity 
of the skunk is that it does not get out of the way for 
people. In a rich prairie country he is very apt to be 
shambling along between the rails and when a train 
comes and he is struck, he makes use of his only 
means of defence, and, while he of course gets killed, 
this peculiar smell may follow along for five hundred 
miles. 

Dogs, who have been in fights with skunks become 
desperately sick, as do humans who get an overdose. 
It has been known to cause insensibility in many 
people and in small quantities is used in medicine, for 
the cure of asthma and similar diseases. 

Taken when young, when they are mere kittens, 
they make a most interesting pet and display as much 
affection for the people among whom they are raised 
as the dog does, and they are extraordinarily cleanly 
about themselves and everything around them in cap- 
tivity. 

Up in Canada it is used for food very extensively, 
but when so intended it must be killed instantly before 
it has time to use its peculiar means of defence. It 
is said to be of excellent food quality, though the 
writer has never tried it. If skunks do not get into 
the habit of raiding poultry houses they are a very 
desirable adjunct on a farm, for they will destroy 
more insects than perhaps any other two or four-footed 
animals on the place. 

*> ♦ ♦ 

How many members of the Inglenook Nature 
Study clubs can tell the common names of the insects 
on the right hand border of the charter? Two of 
them have been described in the Inglenook, namely, 
the Sphinx qiiinque-macnlata and the Cicada sep- 
temdecem, the first being the night-flying moth that 
goes over the jug-handled pupa, and the other is the 
seventeen-year locust. What are the other insects be- 
low? If you have not a charter in your neighbor- 
hood, you ought to have one and you better organize a 
club. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The moles of America belong to the genus scalops, 
and not to the true moles, talpa, found in Europe. 
The ground mole, scalops aquaticus, is found in the 
Eastern and Southern states ; the Western mole, scal- 
ops argentea, being found in Indiana, Michigan, Illi- 
nois, Iowa, Missouri, and Kentucky, and, in fact, in 
the valley of the Mississippi nearly to the gulf, being 
always found in dry land. 

.}. .}» .J. 

There are four separate stages in the development 
of insects. The egg, larvs, pupa, and imago. 



34 



the: INGLEINOOK. 



miNSLtNOOKL 

A Weekily IVIagrazine 

...PUBLISHED BY... 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, ILL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inclenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made: Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 

Brethren Publishing House, 
(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South Sute St., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 

His thoughts are as thine own; nor are his ways 

Other than thine, but by their loftier sense 

Of beauty infinite and love intense. 

Work on. One day, beyond all thoughts of praise. 

A sunny joy will crown thee with its rays; 

Nor other than thy need, thy recompense. 

— George Macdonald. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

A BAD SIDE OF HUMAN NATURE. 



There is a side of hutnan nature that is almost 
inexplicable. The answer to the question as to how 
far we are removed from savages and savage ways 
might be answered in two words : not very. It is not 
a pleasant thing to think about, but it is an indisputable 
fact. Here is something to think about. 

You see a hundred men and women gathered from 
twenty different places. They are mostly, if not all, of 
the better class. They are well-dressed, well-behaved, 
and it is not a crowd in which one would look for a 
lot of the meanest kind of thieves. They are in a 
railroad car going their several ways. The train 
speeds along and when well on its way there is a 
crash-smash, and the cars are all on a pile, some of 
them are on fire and of the fifty people four are killed 
and five wounded. The dead are laid out on the road- 
side in one row, and the wounded in another and then 
what happens? Some of the living rob the dead and 
wounded. It is not an accidental happening, it is a 
universal fact. Inside of a quarter of an hour the 
plundering is on, secretly, but all the same going on. 

The other day a fast train on the B. &. O. smashed 
into some timbers dropped by a freight ahead. Sixty 
people were killed and a lot wounded. One would 
think that in the face of such an appalling disaster 



people would at least refrain from the acts of wild 
beasts, but almost instantly the robbing of the killed 
was begun by the living. It is so in every similar ac- 
cident. Thieves are developed on the instant. 

The Editor is not a pessimist, but facts are facts, and 
if an assembled church were to be wrecked during a 
service, the probabilities are that inside of a half an 
hour the dead would be robbed by some of the living. 
It is not a pleasant thing to think about but it is true 
all the same. The person who sits by you in the car 
talking entertainingly, an entire stranger, is either a 
hero, a coward, or a thief at heart, and it needs only 
the crash and the mangled dead to show where he is 
listed. 

* 4> * 
YOUR FRIENDS. 



Be careful of your friends. No man has too many. 
No man has as many as he thinks he has. His rela- 
tives are not meant by this, but real friends who 
would do anything to help in case of emergency. A 
great many people learn one of the bitterest lessons of 
their lives when adversity overtakes them and they nat- 
urally look to their friends, so alleged, and so be- 
lieved, for assistance which they think is their due, 
only to find that they have been left deserted in the 
vast majority of cases. 

It has been said by men of eminent standing and 
great research that no man has more than three or 
four real friends at the outside, and if this is true, it 
is a sad upsetting of most of our notions on the sub- 
ject. It is altogether likely that it is true, and the 
man for whom everybody is hurrahing will, when' the 
crash comes, find himself deserted. This is sad but it 
is also true. 

Take the case of Christ. He entered the city of 
Jerusalem with waving palm branches and the plaud- 
its of the multitude, and in a very few days when he 
was haled before the Roman magistrate and condemned 
to death in the language of the sacred writer, " They 
all forsook him and fled," all save one who followed 
at a distance and who denied, under oath, that he 
knew the man at all. 

It is an ugly look to take of this thing of doubt- 
ing our friends who profess such devotion to tis, but 
there is nothing like an avalanche of trouble to de- 
termine their real status and whereabouts when the 
disaster comes. Indeed it is one of the compensa- 
tions of trouble that it locates and defines the real value 
of a friend. 

«2* ^ 1^ 

STRANGE ANIMAL FRIENDSHIPS. 



A LI HOUGH the discussion of this properly belongs 
to the Nature Study Department, let us talk a little 
about it in these columns because it is a matter of 
general interest. As a rule the tribal spirit pervades 



the: ingleinook. 



35 



the animal kingdom. Most animals of a kind flock 
together, but occasionally a strange friendship springs 
up between a dog and a cow, a goose and a horse, or 
some other ill-sorted couple, with the result of their 
being a ridiculous exhibition of mutual affection that 
oftener than not provokes laughter. 

The writer once knew of an old horse who was un- 
willing to go away from home unless an old gander, 
who had fallen in love with him, was perched on his 
rump, fluttering and flapping. Both were unhappy 
unless they were in company with one another, and 
never seemed better pleased than when they were en- 
joying an outing together. 

Other instances more pathetic have been recently re- 
ported in the papers. Huddled together under a 
blanket of snow near Central Park, New York, was 
found a crippled squirrel and a collie dog. Through- 
out the long hours of the night the little cripple had 
been sheltered by the collie dog. When they were 
found the squirrel was fast asleep and the dog wide 
awake protecting the animal. 

The squirrel was carried into a nearby police sta- 
tion followed by the dog growling at the captors. A 
bandage was put around the leg of the squirrel and it 
was made as comfortable as possible while the dog 
watched the proceedings with jealous eye. Number- 
less instances of similar affection abound throughout 
the country, and probably every Nook reader who 
lives on a farm has noticed these strangs friendships 
and wondered why they should be brought about. It is 
a difficult thing to answer but the fact remains just 
the same that it is often an actual occurrence. 
»jt »j, ^ 
THE USE OF A SCHOOL. 



Most people attach a great importance to a course 
dt school, especially to a college course. They are 
right as to its value, but wrong as to its method 
of producing the result. Very little in a high school 
or collegiate course has any direct usefulness in life. 
It is far and away behind the little red schoolhouse 
in the immediate value of the output. A man reads, 
writes, and has need of arithmetic every day of the 
year. He may not use his knowledge of Virgil or the 
calculus once in ten years. In fact he readily forgets 
the most of them. Yet they have an untold value in 
nearly all the afifairs of life. It is after this manner : 

The man with a limited education in the three R's 
is like a forged blade that has never been put on a 
grindstone. It is dull, and the longer it is used the 
duller it gets. The college is a mental grindstone, an 
oilstone and a hone. Moreover; it not only sharpens 
the blade but makes it self-sharpening in the future. 
The more it is used the keener the edge. The college 
course is mainly disciplinary, and not practical to any 
great extent. Yet while impracticable in the affairs 



of life, it is the result of age-old experimentation as 
to what is best for sharpening brains. 

The college man will see things on all sides. The 
unlettered man will see only the side nearest to him, 
and that imperfectly. So the college course is not 
what a man gets directly, but what it makes of him 
while he is taking the course. 

♦ * * 
THE FRIARS. 



Prior to the acquirement of the Philippine islands by 
the United States, the friars, a branch of the Catholic 
church, owned a large portion of the land, as is the 
case in all Spanish-speaking countries, by which the 
church came into possession of a vast deal of. public 
property. Then the question came up of getting pos- 
session of the land for the government. The friars 
asked fifteen million dollars for their claims and Gov. 
Taft offered them six millions. After dickering for 
perhaps three years the friars agreed to sell for $7,- 
250,000 in gold. The Pope approved the bargain and 
the settlement now awaits the action of our war depart- 
ment. The settlement provides for the purchase of 
403,000 acres of land. 

There is doubt as to the ownership of these lands, 
but to dispossess them would involve protracted and 
expensive litigation, and in all probability the Spanish 
government would confirm the friars' claim and de- 
feat the United States court. What is to become of 
the friars themselves is not known. They are cordi- 
ally hated by a large part of the native population and 
the chances are that in the course of time they will 
drift away to more genial sections of the country. 
<' ♦ '> 

The American date is expected to be on the mar- 
ket before a great while. Down in Arizona near Phoe- 
nix and Tucson they are growing groves of hun- 
dreds of date palms. Its trees came from -near Bag- 
dad and Muscat where there are seven millions of date 
palms growing. The tree begins to bear when it is 
five or six years old and it is thought that date culture 
will be a possibility in Arizona. If such proves to be 
true a wonderful field will be opened for the hot 
counti-y farmer. 

•> ♦ *5* 

Thi£ attention of the Nook family is again called 
to the coming presentation of the correspondence 
school of letter-writing. After reading over the mat- 
ter, as prepared, the editor is constrained to think that 
there will be a great deal of instruction available in 
the series. He who follows closely, and heeds care- 
fully, will be sure to be benefited, unless he is already 
a conceded expert along this line. 

*** *$*■ *** 

" The saddest songs are the sweetest echoes of the 
heart. Conscience and memory enshrine them." 



3^^ 



the: ingi_e:nook. 



WHAT'S THE NEWS? 



Gen. Reyes has been elected president of Colombia. 

The pope uses a nickel watch given him by his moth- 
er and refuses to use a better one. 



President Roosevelt has appointed W. I. Buchanan 
as United States minister to Panama. 



The eastern part of the United States is the coldest 
this winter that it has been since 1875. 



Some of the theaters in Philadelphia are being closed 
as a result of the holocaust in Chicago. 



Both Russia and England are reported as playing 
a game of intrigue for control of Thibet. 

President Roosevelt is closely watching afifairs in 
Russia so far as they relate to the Jews. 



The increase of population through immigration is 
reported to be about a million for the past year. 

\Vm. Jennings Bryan says that farming is one of 
the surest and most remunerative occupations. 



President Roosevelt thanks the nations for their ex- 
pression of sympathy with the Chicago victims. 

There was a bad collision on the Rock Island near 
Topeka, Kans., in which many persons were hurt. 

A semi-official confirmation of the report that the 
Union Pacific is to own the Alton has been put forth. 



On account of the war prospects Japanese securities 
have fallen in value and the bankers are much alarmed. 



It has been suggested that a memorial be erected in 
the shape of a church or hall on the site of the Iro- 
quois theater. 

The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe railroad system 
has been placed on the unfair list by the American 
Federation of Labor. 

John Alexander Dowie has sailed for Australia. 
His financial complications at his Zion city are all 
satisfactorily arranged. 

The Sioux Indians of South Dakota are selling 
bogus elk teeth for twenty-five cents. The genuine 
thing is worth five dollars. 

The Supreme Court holds that citizens of Porto 
Rico are not aliens and that they may enter this 
country without obstruction. 

Theater passes are to be abolished in Chicago, as it 
is believed that the possession of a pass makes an of- 
ficial extremelv unobservant. 



All the theaters in Chicago were ordered closed by 
the mayor pending their complying with the law re- 
lating to their being made safe. 

Hundreds of estates are likely to be entangled in the 
courts through the Chicago theater fire in deciding 
which member of the familv died first. 



Geo. Longstreet. a very prominent confederate vet- 
eran, is dead at the age of eighty-three. He contract- 
ed a cold which developed into pneumonia. 



The use of oil as locomotive fuel is being extended 
continually. .Ml the locomotives of the Southern Pa- 
cific railway are to be converted into oil burners. 



There has been a big shrinkage in the profits of 
steel making. The earnings for the quarter have 
dropped from thirty-two millions to nearly twelve mil- 
lions. 

Two big discoveries of radium have been made in 
Utah and Idaho. The ore has been tested by a New 
York assayer and is declared to show a large amoimt 
of radium. 

E. H. Harriman is said to be likely to succeed Pres- 
ident Burt of the Union Pacific. This will make the 
Harriman interest still more solid among the western 
railroads. 

An investigation of the causes of the holocaust at 
the Iroquois theater is in progress at the present writ- 
ing. It is likely that the matter will be probed to the 
very bottom. 

The actual list of the dead at the Chicago theater fire 
is said to be almost, if not over, six hundred people. 
Some are injured and will yet die and the exact figures 
cannot be stated. 

The officials of the Northwest Mounted Police are 
moving the Canadian outposts along the Alaskan 
boundary in accordance with the award of the arbi- 
tration commission. 

The actual total dead at the Iroquois theater, 
Chicago, now number 594, although the num- 
ber may be added to or taken from a little later when 
the exact statistics are available. 



Leonard Wood, whose nomination for the position 
of Major General of the L'nited States .'\rmy has been 
held up, pending an investigation, has now been re- 
ported favorably and doubtless he will be confirmed. 

The British navy is preparing for a war, apparently, 
and the shipyards are working overtime getting ready 
for service in the Orient. It is said that Japan will get 
Korea or fight Russia, and England is to back up 
Japan. 



the: ingleinook. 



37 



At this writing they are working on the causes that 
led to the destruction of the Iroquois theater in Chi- 
cago. They will endeavor to fix the responsibilit\- 
where it belongs and then the guilty parties will be 
punished if possible. 

It has been- found that the fire curtain, an asbestos 
and unburnable drop curtain that falls between a stage 
fire and the audience, struck a part of the machinery 
at the Iroquois theater, in Chicago, and this made the 
loss of life a possibility. 



George P. Morehead, of South Bend, Ind., on Jan. 
4, sent for his bride-to-be. Miss Mary Tutt, and was 
married to her propped up in bed. A few minutes 
later he willed his bride his fortune of $50,000. and 
two hours thereafter he was dead. 



Marie Corelli, the novelist, was awarded a half cent 
damages in a libel suit brought by her against the pro- 
prietor of the Stratford-on-Avon Herald in relation to 
the erection of a Carnegie librar)', urging that it dese- 
crated the birthplace of Shakespeare. 



Uncle Joe Cannon, Speaker of the House at Wash- 
ington, in paying for a set of sixty volumes of an 
American historical work, made the endorsement on 
the back of the check that he was never too old to 
learn, referring to the character of the books. 



The Texas cattle fever which destroys many cattle 
in Texas, and which is introduced into other sections 
of the country, has been found to be a blood dis- 
ease which destroys the red corpuscles in the cattle's 
blood. It is closely related to the cattle being infested 
with a sort of tick. 



The clergymen of various denominations in Chi- 
cago have made applications to the receivers of Zion 
City to invade that town for the purpose of holding 
revival and mission services. It is urged that the peo- 
ple of Zion City are in a receptive frame of mind now. 
and will listen to missionary effort. 



Frederick Pabst, the millionaire brewer of Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, on Christmas made gifts to every 
member of his family, aggregating some five million or 
six million dollars. He believed that his end was not 
far off, and he did die a little later. His entire wealth 
would perhaps reach ten million dollars. 



At the close of 1902 the employes of the banking 
house of J. P. Morgan & Co. were each given a check 
for one hundred per cent of their salary for the year. 
At the close of last year they were given checks for 
twenty-five per cent of their salary, while some of them 
received but ten or fifteen per cent. There was much 
dissatisfaction, although it was hard to tell why there 
should be any. 



It is said that patriotism is increasing among the 
Chinese on account of the continued Russian encroach- 
ment. Patriotism among the Chinese has been hither- 
to an unknown quantity, and if the country succeeds 
in taking on this new spirit, other countries taking 
aggressive stands toward China may come to regret 
it. 

There is an authorized statement that Dreyfus will 
be granted a new trial. The French people seem to 
have sobered up since the original trial which sent him 
to his death imprisonment from which he was saved by 
being released. His new trial will probably be the 
means of rehabilitating him in his official position in 
the army. 

A fire destroyed the Northwest wing of the State 
capitol of Iowa Jan. 4. The estimated loss was five 
hundred thousand dollars. The fire started about ten 
o'clock in the morning, and it was thought that the 
whole building was doomed. Its origin is not known 
and an investigation is ordered to determine the cause 
of the blaze. 



All the theaters of Chicago are shut for good, and 
some of them are not likely to open at all, as it will 
cost too much to comply with the provisions of the 
law. Here in Elgin the authorities are looking after 
the buildings that are likely to be on fire some day, 
in order to ascertain whether or not they are provided 
with adequate fire escapes. 

The employes of the Pullman Company are advised 
informally that the plants are to close. The officials 
say that this move means a general overhauling, but 
union leaders see signs of a fight against their organi- 
zation. This means that over seven thousand people 
will be laid off and the chances are that there will be 
much suffering among the poor and more improvident 
workers. 

With the consent of her father, a wealthy manufac-. 
turer of Louisville, Ky., Alice . Pilcher, aged twenty- 
one, has for three years been masquerading through 
Montana as a boy. She was known as Percy Pilcher. 
She is said to have gone west because she was threat- 
ened with consumption and was told by her doctor that 
she would have to rough it. Contracting a severe cold, 
her identity was made known. 



The sea of Azov is a part of the northern subdi- 
vision of the Black sea. Its length is two hundred 
miles and its breadth is eighty miles. Its greatest 
depth is about fifty feet. This sea is disappearing in 
the earth and remarkable scenes are in the course of en- 
actment. Vessels are lying high and dry and the 
greatest confusion prevails in the harbor. Perhaps no 
body of water so abounds with fish. It is probable 
that volcanic eruptions are chargeable with the disap- 
pearance of this body of water. 



38 



HI 



inc3l_e:nook. 



THE ARMY'S "HANDY MAN." 



A WEEK or two before any other troops reach 
the place, for the fall maneuvers, the engi- 
neer battalion, is in camp and doing hard 
work. Where the high water had washed out 
a bridge they built one of pontoons or cut 
some scraggly timber and there comes forth 
a staunch structure on piles. Where the rain made 
an important road impassable these soldiers, who 
can wield a pick or an axe as well as gun, made it 
firm to give good footing for an army. Down in 
the drv river bed, where heavy guns are to be 
dragged across, they again prepared the way by 
cutting sunflower stalks and burying them under 
the sand until there was a solid roadway. All over 
the field are evidences of the engineers' work. 

In the flats across the river from the camp the 
engineers have a little school of intrenchments 
where the other arms of the service are taught 
how to intrench. At the same time they are learn- 
ing the tactical value of intrenchments. These in- 
trenchments are so placed as to prevent the enemy 
from crossing or capturing the pontoon bridge in 
front of them. A half mile or more' away lie high 
bluffs, and these had to be taken into considera- 
tion in placing the works. 

Where a soldier digs a trench under fire his first 
purpose is protection. He digs enough to permit 
him to lie down and continue the excavation. Next 
he makes the trench into what is called a kneeling 
trench. The standing trench comes next, and the 
last stage is the complete trench. In this a man 
standing is fully protected from the fire in front 
and the pit is wide enough to let two men pass in 
it. All the earth, of course, is thrown up on the 
side the fire comes from. In the complete trench 
this parapet has grown so heavy that shrapnel will 
not penetrate it. The engineers design these 
trenches and show how they are to be made, but 
troops from other detachments do the digging that 
they may leave. As a detachment comes to this 
intrenchment school, it is divided into two reliefs, 
one for the ditch and one under arms to do fight- 
ing if necessary. The first relief pass in a line a 
stack of shovels and picks, and each man takes 
one of each. As they stand along the trench line 
they stand apart at arms' length, and each man 
strikes his pick in the ground in front of his right 
foot. The distance betvseen his pick and that of 
his neighbor on his left is the space he is to dig. 
They unsling their guns, take off blouses and belts, 
and go to work. A half hour and the second relief 
takes the picks and shovels while the first resume 
their arms and go to fighting if there is any being 
done. These soldiers can dig trenches that would 
make glad the heart of a contractor. The sides 



are smooth and corners are as square as if cut in 
stone. The vigor and earnestness with which they 
wield the pick and shovel show that they are not 
adverse to a change once in a while. 

The engineers also teach how to make willow 
baskets that will hold earth for defenses, and walls 
of woven willow that serve to hold loose earth 
in position. Boxes, barrels and square oil cans — 
" bi-products of military administration," as. 
they are called — also serve in building of de- 
fenses. In several places are " splinter-proofs " 
that remind the layman of dugouts. These offer 
shelter from splinters of exploding shells. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
OLDEST GOSPELS LOCATED. 



Mrs. Agnes Smith Lewis and Mrs. Margaret Dun- 
lap Gibson, of Cambridge, England, are in New 
York to lecture on a great Biblical discovery, for 
which the University of Heidelberg recently upset 
all traditions by conferring degrees on the two 
women. They discovered what is known among 
scholars as the Lewis Palimpsest. This is a Syriac 
version of the four Gospels, pronounced to be the 
oldest manuscript of the Gospels yet discovered. 

The earliest known date for a manuscript of the 
Gospels before this discovery was i6o A, D., the 
date of Tatian's diatessaron. Hjelt, the Swedish 
philologist, backed by the German critics, declares 
on philological grounds that the discovery made by 
the two English women throws the date of the 
earliest known manuscript of the Gospels far back 
of that year. 

Mrs. Lewis and Mrs. Gibson, who are twin sis- 
ters, made a caravan trip of nine days into the 
heart of the Arabian desert to find this manuscript. 
They discovered it in a Greek monastery, almost 
as old as the Christian era, built on the side of M, 
Mount Sinai, eighty miles from the nearest build- ■ 
ing — a strange old jumble of towers and dungeons 
fortified by the Roman emperor, Justinian, in the 
fifth century, and known to have existed two hun- 
dred years before that time. 

A palimpsest is a parchment from which one writ- 
ing has been erased to make room for another. 
In this palimpsest the second writing, clear and 
bold, was " The Lives of Holy Women." Between 
the lines and on the margin of this queer, ram- 
bling old record could be detected the faint tracery 
of an earlier writing, erased to make room for the 
second on the precious vellum. With the passage 
of time the ox3^gen of the air combined with the 
iron of the ink had made it again visible. 

There they were, the four Gospels, laboriously 
set down in Syriac by some early Christian of Pal- 
estine within one hundred and fifty years after the 



the: inglenook. 



39 



crucifixion, afterward erased by some old medissval 
monk to make room for his " Lives of Holy Wom- 
en." This work was photographed page by page. 
The sisters bought a quantity of old writings 
from a dealer in Jaffa, among which Dr. Schecter, 
then of Cambridge university, found the first leaf 
of the original manuscript of the " Book of Ec- 
clesiastes," written 200 B. C. This led to recovery 
of other parts of the manuscript. Previously there 
had existed only Greek and Syriac translations of 

Ecclesiastes. 

.;. .J. ^ 

SMALL BILLS. 



WiTHix the last two years Chicago has come in for 
a heavv increase in the one and two-dollar bills that 
once were so much missed by the New Yorker in the 
West. The change has come about within twenty-four 
months, and it has become so universal that a cashier 
in a restaurant is likely to express regret at having to 
give you more than one silver dollar out of change 
for a five-dollar bill. 

Oddly enough, this situation is wholly acceptable 
to the people in spite of the fact that with the circu- 
lation of the paper money the percentage of loss over 
the loss of silver dollars is many times greater. Al- 
most anything accidental may end the life of the bill, 
a draft may take it out of a window, fire will destroy 
it in a moment, even a dashing rainstorm may de- 
face it till it is illegible, and it is always a mark for 
the rat and mouse seeking bedding material. 

But the silver dollar is hard to carry in the pocket ; 
it is heavy, and its metallic clink in the trousers 
pocket is not musical. There are more germs on the 
paper than could be harbored on the silver, and they 
are there to stay until somebody goes after them with 
some germicide; but as against the inconveniences 
of the silver, the general public will put the one and 
two-dollar bills in its pocket with a sense of relief 
from the weight of the silver and from the metallic 
" chink " of the wagon wheel coin. 
♦ ♦ <S» 
A GRANDFATHER'S CLOCK. 



A grandfather's clock was brought to a watch- 
maker's shop in Philadelphia, recently, for repairs, the 
first that have been made upon it since some trifling 
one in 1778, which was due to the raid of the Indians 
under Brant and the tory Butler at Cherry Valley in 
November of that year. 

The clock was then the property of Samuel Mc- 
Keen, who lived on a farm east of Cherry Valley, 
and whose ancestors brought it from England to this 
country in 1740. It was the only clock in the Cherry 
Valley settlement, and when the Indians and tories 
appeared there McKeen fled with the clock to the 



woods and buried it under the dead leaves and brush. 

It was all that he saved from the torch, and days 
passed before he ventured to recover it. It needed 
but slight repairs to set it going as well as ever. 

The clock, which bears across its face the name of 
Thomas Jenkin, Sandwich, has long been in posses- 
sion of the Allen family of Picrstown, and it is Mrs. 
James Allen who has brought it forth for its first fixing 
up in 125 years. 

'^ ^4 «^ 

A QUEER EXPERIMENT. 



The grafting of frog-skin on the hand of a patient 
has been , successfully performed by Surgeon West- 
fall at the homeopathy hospital of the University of 
Michigan. Albert Witte, a furniture workman of 
Adrian, had his hand ciught in a sander, and lost 
twenty inches of skin from the palm and back of the 




NO CARE HERE. 

hand. Doctor Westfall secured a large live frog, and 
after destroying its brain, thoroughly cleaned the skin, 
sliced the white skin off its belly, and placed the par- 
ticles on the area to be covered. These grafts were 
covered with a very thin rubber tissue, and that sur- 
rounded by dressing moistened by a common salt 
solution. After ninety-six hours the frog-skin grafts 
had united, the granulation on the surface of the raw 
hand had penetrated up through the frog skin and. 
projected beyond the surface of the latter, so that 
the whole surface appeared red. — The American Cul- 
tivator. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Thomas A, Edison was once asked by a lady if he 
were a total abstainer from drink. When told that he 
was she asked : " May I inquire what made you so ? "' 
And he replied: "I think it was because I always felt 
that I had a better use for my head." Comment upon 
his answer is hardly necessary. 
•■> ♦ ♦ 

The true heroes of the world are not the bread- 
winners, but the truth-seekers. — M. H. DuBose. 



40 



the: inol-EINOOK. 



RECIPES WORTH FORTUNES. 



Quite recentl} the recipe how to make a certain 
bilious and liver pill was sold in a London auction 
mart for $9,000. Another pill was put up for auc- 
tion at a reserve of $2,500. It produced of net 
profit only $1,700 per annum, but the auctioneer 
explained that this could be largely augmented by 
judicious advertising. 

Eau de Cologne is a valuable secret. Giovanni 
Farina, the inventor of that wonderful perfume, at 
one time oiTered to sell the recipe for $3,750, but 
since then the value has risen enormously, and only 
a millionaire could buy it. 

Worcester sauce was the invention of a butler 
many years ago. It was an indispensable requisite 
in the house where he was employed, and in course 
of time the head of the firm of Lea & Perrins 
bought the recipe for a trifle. That little scrap of 
yellow paper which made the fortune of the firm 
is carefully preserved and is valued at many thou- 
sands of dollars. And the recipe for Day & Mar- 
tin's blacking was given to Mr. Day 150 years ago 
by a grateful soldier whose coach fare he had gen- 
erously paid. 

When the pope was enthroned, the brilliant red 
robes of the cardinals arrested the attention. All 
the crimson cloth of which these robes are made 
has been supplied for generations past by the same 
family of cloth merchants. They have a secret 
process by which the special dye is distilled, and 
the recipe is not to be purchased at any price. 
Only the heads of the family have been entrusted 
with the secret. 

Typefounders have their secret methods. One 
very old firm, famous for the quality of its tj'pe, 
has a recipe for mixing the necessary ingredients 
for turning out a metal hard, durable, and yet 
which will not chip. The heads of the firm jealous- 
ly guard this, and the disclosure to a trade rival 
would be a loss of many thousands of dollars. 

The Oxford Press people are proud of the quality 
of the paper used in making their Bibles. It is 
thin and tough, and was the outcome of exhaustive 
experiments. The formula is valued at one and 
one-fourth million dollars. Bank of England notes 
are of a special paper, which belongs to the Portals 
of Laverstoke. That firm supplies all the paper to 
the Bank of England, and the possession of the 
recipe for making the paper has enabled the for- 
tunate owners to accumulate a fortune. 

Bacon is a popular dish, and a Wiltshire firm of 
bacon driers paid $50,000 for the Brandenburg meth- 
od of curing hams. 

Restaurateurs -have any number of sauces and 
condiments brought under their notice. Every 
gourmand has a special way he likes a dish sea- 



soned, and the happy proprietors of the old rec- 
ipes are in the enjoyment of large incomes, simply 
because they own a bit of paper an inch or two 
square. Usually the most successful article is the 
simplest to make if you know the way. A special 
chutney was sold a few months ago for $37,500; 
originally it. was the invention of an Indian, and 
the recipe was obtained from him at the outlay of 
only a few rupees. 

Absinthe was at one time only known to a French 
chemist, and perhaps for the good of the world 
it would have been better had the secret died with 
him. He sold it for a few hundred francs. A dis- 
tiller detected the merits of the seductive liquor 
and paid $50,000 for the chemist's note book. He 
is said to have made one and one-fourth million 
dollars by it. 

But patent medicines have the steadiest value. 
.\ny popular pill or ointment or tonic recipe can- 
not be bought. The recipe means the whole busi- 
ness of the firm, and represents an annual profit of 
thousands of dollars. To sell the recipe would kill 
the goose that laid the golden eggs. A sum of 
$125,000 cash was ofifered for the recipe of a certain 
medicinal syrup, but the bargain was not effected. 

Lavender water is supplied to the king by 
Sprules, and the particular method by which this 
water is distilled is a carefully guarded trade se- 
cret. Maraschino comes from Dalmatia, and was 
easily obtained. But there must be many recipes 
of great commercial value in existence, the use of 
which is confined to families. If known and taken 
into favor by the public a fortune would result. 
* ♦ ♦ 
DO YOU WALK STRAIGHT ? 



" Have you ever noticed how few people walk 
straight?" said the man who finds fault. " I am not 
speaking in a spiritual sense, neither do I refer to their 
gait, which is certainly bad enough, but to the crook- 
edness of their path. A straight road is not at all times 
possible, I admit, and when the streets are most crowd- 
ed a fellow is excusable for darting around any old 
way, but when given a clear sidewalk I can't for the 
life of me see why he cannot walk straight. 

" Watch any man, and women are just as bad, who 
starts out from home at an hour when other people 
in the neighborhood are busy on their own doorsteps 
and give him a clean sweep. Since there are no ob- 
structions in the way, there is no reason on earth why 
he should not proceed in a straight line to the near- 
est corner, but instead of pursuing that undeviating ■ 
course he zigzags most suspiciously. Now he is peril- 
ously near the curb, now brushing against the area 
railing, while occasionally he evens things up by tak- 
ing a few steps in the middle of the pavement. The 
people who thus waver in their gait are perfectly sober 



the: inglenook. 



41 



and would be surprised if anybody should show them a 
diagram of their tracks. Naturally all that veering 
and tacking appreciably increases the distance trav- 
eled, which is another reason why people in a hurry 
should learn to walk straight." 

♦Jt ^* •$» 

THE GOSPEL IN KINDNESS TO ANIMALS. . 



The settees in Boston Common and public garden 
on pleasant days are largely occupied by men who 
seem to have nothing to do. The other day we saw 
a beautiful gray squirrel spring fearlessly on the back 
of one of these seats. A man who sat there took a fil- 



being hunted and maltreated, but now such conduct is 
rare. A new literature has sprung up and become 
popular in schools and homes which acquaints children 
with wild things in parks and woods till they are find- 
ing man a friend ; and man is growing more human 
in cultivating friendliness toward, them. There is a 
genuine gospel in stocking the public parks with ani- 
mals and teaching children to protect them — for 

" He prayeth best who loveth best 
All things both great and small. 
For the dear God who loveth ns 
He made and loveth all." 

— Tlie Congregationalist. 




BOTETOURT NORMAL, DALEVILLE, VA. HOME OF INGLENOOK NATURE STUDY CLUB NO. 21. 



bert from his pocket and held it out. The squirrel 
cocked his eye questioningly at the man and the nut, 
then came and took it, sat up on his hind feet and went 
to work on it. The look of kindness that came into 
that man's face remains with us now. Who that is 
in middle life cannot remember when the sight of an 
animal running loose would not stir any boy to look 
for a stone instead of a nut? No evidence of the 
progress of civilization is more marked than the change 
of temper in the treatment of animals. It affects all 
classes. Mr. Charles Booth, in his studies of " Life 
and Labor in London," quotes an old resident of one 
of the poorest districts as saying that he could remem- 
ber when no cat could appear in the streets without 



Perseverance will not only make friends, but it 
will make favorable circumstances. It will change the 
face of all things around us, clouds 'of darkness, evil 
forebodings, opposition, enemies, barriers of every 
kind, will vanish before a stout heart and resolute en- 
ergy of soul. 

♦♦♦ *j» .t» 

The word " infantry " was first used by the Span- 
iards to designate the bodyguard of the infante, or heir 
to the Spanish throne. 

4* 4* 4> 

Write your name in kindness, love and mercy on the 
hearts of those who come in contact with you, and 
you will never be forgotten. — Chalmers. 



42 



the: INCSil-EINOOK. 



TO CULTIVATE PERSIMMONS. 



The Missouri persimmon, dear to true Missourians, 
is about to enter upon a new era of usefulness. 
Experiments are making which, it is believed, will 
demonstrate that the persimmon may be improved 
and made a cultivated plant. It is proposed to 
put the Missouri persimmon on a solid commercial 
basis and it is not improbable that persimmon or- 
chards will be almost as common as peach orchards 
and more profitable. The only persimmon orchard 
in this state is at the university experiment station 
here. The orchard was planted and cultivated by 
Dr. J. C. Whitten, of the university faculty, and, 
although it is only a few years old, results have 
convinced him that there is a future for the per- 
simmon. In this orchard are many varieties of na- 
tive wild persimmons as well as the large Japanese 
persimmons, which are grown with protection in 
winter. Last year the orchard of wild plants and 
new varieties bore its first crop. This year the or- 
chard has a very good crop and the efifects of cul- 
tivation are already apparent. Some of this year's 
crop are without seeds and are much larger than 
the wild forms. Dr. Whitten said : 

Many wild plants, on being grafted, pass from 
the wild to the cultivated state much improved in 
size and flavor. The first step in ameliorating a 
wild plant is to take from it the hindrances to 
growth with which it has to contend in the wild 
state. It is placed under conditions where its 
growth is as easy as possible. If the wild plant is 
of a fixed type there is no starting point, and there 
is little hope of any improvement. Where there 
are many varieties of the same plant there is a start- 
ing point, and by taking the best wild specimens 
and relieving them of the struggle for existence 
they will make continued improvement, giving birth 
in a few generations to a new and much improved 
variety. A philosophical consideration of the sub- 
ject shows that where, as in the case of the per- 
simmon, there are many varieties and many forms 
of the fruit with a wide distribution, there are 
greater opportunities for improvement and cultiva- 
tion. A race of fruit that in its native state spreads 
over the world has greater hope of development 
than one that in its wild state occupies only a limit- 
ed space. 

The Missouri paw paw belongs to the latter class. 
It is the last member of its race, a race that was 
once numerous and spread over many parts of the 
world, but which, crowded out by more hardy 
plants, is now to be fotmd only in isolated places. 
It has assumed a fixed type. The Missouri paw 
paw ,is good already. It probably will remain as 
good and never will be better. There is no hope 
of it taking on new life under cultivation. The 



persimmon is good already, but will be better. Few 
persons know that the wild Missouri persimmon 
sells for a good price in the large cities. Many per- 
simmons are shipped from all parts of Missouri to 
Ivansas City and St. I.ouis and find a ready sale at 
the same price as strawberries. The supply is nev- 
er equal to the demand, and many farmers' chil- 
dren would find persimmon gathering a profitable 
occupation. 

In cultivating and improving the persimmon it 
is our object to eliminate the seeds, increase the 
size and improve the flavor. In the persimmon or- 
chard which we are growing here we are gather- 
ing tl^e seeds from the most nearly seedless wild 
varieties. Cultivated trees grown from these seeds 
show a decrease in the number of seeds. Some 
have two seeds, some no seeds at all, while others 
average a dozen seeds to each piece of fruit. We 
helievc we can develop a seedless persimmon. 

The persimmon varies very much in size, shape, 
cjuality and time of ripening. Some ripen early in 
August and some late in winter, so the fruit will 
cover a long period of time. The fact that most 
persimmons ripen late gives rise to the popular idea 
tliat they are ripened by the frost. A frost is no 
more beneficial to persimmons than a freeze is to 
late winter apples. Persimmons of the late variety 
may be picked green and placed in a cellar or oth- 
er dark, dry place and will ripen as well as if left 
on the trees. The fruit rarel}' decays in storage 
and when placed in a dark, dry, cool place will 
ripen slowly, become mellow and delicious in about 
six weeks. If left it will dry like a fig and will 
keep in this condition many years, making a dry, 
delicious candied fruit. 

- This work a few horticulturists are doing in cul- 
tivating the persimmon is not without precedent. 
The Oriental persimmon, grown in China and Ja- 
pan, is an important fruit and occupies the same 
place in those countries that the apple does in Amer- 
ica. The Japanese persimmon is nearly as large as 
an apple, is grown as easil}" and is prepared for the 
table in many forms. These persimmorts have been 
introduced in southern California and are grown 
successfull}'. This fruit is ahead of the American 
persimmon in size, but is deficient in flav^or and 
quality. 

By giving them winter protection we are grow- 
ing Japanese persimmons here and we hope that 
when our Japanese trees reach bearing age we will 
be able to cross them with the native fruit, pro- 
ducing a new persimmon, as large in size as the 
Japanese variety and with the excellent quality and 
hardiness of the American fruit. If this hope is 
realized, we shall have a new fruit better than oi 
ther of the old. 






V 



the: INGLEINOOK. 



43 



Several years ago an attempt was made to cross 
the two by shipping pollen from California, but 
the fruit blossoms so early in California that by 
tlie time the pollen reached here it was too old. 
It was then decided that it would be necessary to 
grow the Japanese variety here in order to secure 
the cross. 

Prof. Whitten is a graduate of the South Da- 
kota Agricultural college and of the university of 
Halle, Germany. 

* * ♦ 

A SWARM OF LOCUSTS. 



TRAP BEASTS TO SHOW. 



BY W. B. STOVER. 



A FEW days ago there came across the country here 
a great swarm of " tidd," as they are called here, 
locusts. At first I was inclined to insist that they were 
grasshoppers, but finally I agreed with evers'body else 
that they were tidd. 

They came from the west of us about three miles, 
where we had been noticing large numbers of them 
on the trees and bushes for some weeks. They came 
as a storm cloud comes. And the sound of their wings, 
when their cloud was above us, was like a heavy fall- 
ing rain. They came ikying in the sky, and the bend- 
ing movement of the dark reddish cloud of them was 
a study. But the natives felt that there was nothing 
to study. With them it was fear for the crops yet on 
the field. 

Our boys became uncontrollable. So I left them 
run. Gathering pans or anything to make a noise, 
they ran into the fields, and with people from the sur- 
rounding villages did all they knew how to drive them 
away. They yelled, beat the pans, struck wildly to 
the right and to the left with sticks, brushes, or. any- 
thing, endeavoring to keep the evil things from light- 
ing. 

The cloud moved on, while only the stragglers 
seemed to settle down on us. And after about two 
hours all that wished to stay with us had taken their 
departure. There was little damage done. 

But I can now understand how that the sun can be 
hid with a cloud of locusts. I can now understand 
how they can destroy a whole crop of ripening grain 
in a few hours. • 

The full grown locust is about four inches long, and 
blessed with tremendous wings. They multiply at a 
surprisingly rapid rate. 

Next day we saw their reddish cloud east of us mov- 
ing north. I was in doubts about it, but the bovs all 
were sure, so I assumed they were right. We have 
heard nothing more of them since, except that a cloud 
of them visited Anklesvar lately. 

Biilsar, India. 



Animal dealers keep expert animal catchers in all 
parts of the world. The Hagenbacks have established 
two collecting stations in charge of stationary repre- 
sentatives — one in Calcutta and the other at Aden. To 
these distributing points the traveling representatives 
ship their catches, and when a sufficient number of 
animals has been gathered, they are transported to 
Flamburg, whence they are sent to all countries of the 
world. One firm has twenty-two representatives 
abroad, all of them experienced in trapping and ship- 
ping the wildest and most ferocious beasts. 

Tigers and occasionally lions are caught in pits, and 
leopards, panthers, jaguars, and the like in traps. Ze- 
bras are extraordinarily hard to secure, and are propor- 
tionately valuable. The emu is taken in Patagonia by 
the natives, who use the South American lariat. A 
hippopotamus, a crocodile, or a rhinoceros is not 
caught by the agents of animal firms, but is usually 
found in the possession of the rajahs and other pro- 
vincial rulers in Cochin China, Nera, and Siam. They 
keep them just as people in this country keep a kennel, 
and they love to show them off to visitors. 

All animals are cowards, according to the agents. 
Unless a tiger or a lion, or indeed any wild beast, has 
tasted human blood, he is quite ready to let you go 
your way if you will let him go his. In captivity, the 
agents say, you can enter any cage provided you have 
your whip with a lead bullet on the end in your hand, 
and provided also that you know how to use it eflect- 
ively. But the least lack of vigilance means destruc- 
tion. You might tend an animal for years and have 
him know you well, but that would not insure you 
against an attack from him the first chance that of- 
fered. 

♦ *■ ♦ 

HOW BIRDS ARE PHOTOGRAPHED. 



In the new method of the study and photography of 
birds, instead of attempting to go to the bird, the bird 
is brought directly before the observer — nest, young, 
branch and all. The nest, whatever its original po- 
sition, is moved with its supports to a favorable place 
for study. A green tent is then pitched beside it, and 
under this perfect screen the observer can watch by 
the hour and accurately record the shifting panoramic 
scenes of nest life. One might suppose that birds 
would desert their homes under such conditions, and 
thus promptly end the matter, but, instead, they for- 
get the old site, adopt the new one, and defend it with 
all their customary vigor and persistence. 
•> ♦ ♦ 

The pleasantest things in the world are pleasant 
thoughts and the greatest art in life is to have as. 
many of them as possible. — Bovee. 



44 



the: INOLEINfOOK. 



(5^ 



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THE END OF THE RAINBOW. 



Ho! for the end of the rainbow.! 
Ho! for the pot of gold. 

We'll journey along 

With a smile and a jong 
And we'll hark to the stories of old. 

Ho! for the end of the rainbow! 

With hearts that are stout and strong! 
Though the gold we miss 
We have had the bliss 
Of the smile and the story and song. 

— Washington Star. 
•{♦ ♦ ♦ 

A DRINK FROM COFFEE LEAVES. 



A COFFEE expert said the other day that he was sur- 
prised there was no trade in cofifee leaves, similar in 
character to the trade in coffee berries. " The leaves," 
he explained, " are used by the poor people of Ceylon 
:and other countries extensively. They are boiled in 
water, just as the berries are, and they make a drink, 
somewhat harsh in taste, that is even more stimulating 
than real coffee. Drinking an infusion of coffee 
leaves, a man can do a tremendous lot of work. Your 
Ceylonese, subsisting on rice mixed with leaf coffee, 
will work for days and weeks in the rice fields, up to his 
knees in mud and water, now drenched with violent 
and cold rains, now tormented by the fierce heat of the 
tropical sun, going to work at 4 o'clock in the morning 
and not quitting his labors until eight or nine o'clock 
at night. Coft'ee leaves are inexpensive. I imagine 
that they could be sold here in the United States for 
two cents a pound. I am surprised that some enter- 
prising man does not establish a leaf coffee business. 
It would be a new thing, and the world likes new 
things. He could pack his product in attractive one- 
pound boxes, label it ' leaf coffee,' and sell it for five 
or ten cents a box. To the very poor leaf coffee would 

■ be a boon." 

* * * 

TALKING THROUGH 'PHONE. 



To be a good telephone talker is something of an 
art, but in these days it should, by all means, be cul- 
tivated as much as any of the methods of polite con- 
versation. The first requisite is the proper pose. In 
all cases the transmitter should be as nearly vertical 
as possible, with the voice funnel so adjusted that it 
is on a level with the lips when the head is in the or- 
dinary arched position of conversation. Then the lips 



should be held about an inch away from the funnel 
and directly opposite its center. The speaker should 
talk in a tone slightly above the ordinary conversa- 
tional pitch, about in the same way as if he were 
speaking to a person across the room. 

But, more than all, care should be taken to talk 
slowly and to articulate with the greatest distinct- 
ness ; to be deliberate on what one says, and to make 
ample pause at the end of each sentence. The tele- 
phone is such a time saver that one even over a toll 
line need not be unduly worried in being in too much 
of a hurry to finish. On the contrary, time and an- 
noyance for one's self and one's correspondent will 
be saved by talking slowly and allowing a little time 
for the mental reception of the ideas that one wishes 
to transmit. Nothing can be more erroneous in the 
use of a solid back instrument than to stand at a dis- 
tance from the instrument and endeavor to affect it by 
shouting at the top of one's lungs. — American Tele- 
phone Journal. 

•$• <- •!• 

WHINING AN ODIOUS HABIT. 



There isn't anything in the world more disagree- 
able than a whining person. He whines if it is hot. 
He whines if it is cold. He whines at this, he whines 
at that, he whines at everything. Whine, whine, 
whine. It is just a habit he has fallen into. Tliere is 
nothing the matter with him. It is just a bad habit. 

The whiner is generally an idle person or a lazy one. 
What he needs is to be set to work — at real hard work, 
mental or physical. Some work that will interest him 
and engage his whole attention and he will not have 
time to whine. We know two women. One of them 
does her own housework and takes care of her horse 
besides. She is happy and singing all the day long. 
The keyboard of her life sounds no whining note. It 
is a pleasure to be with her, a good, wholesome tonic 
to watch her. The other woman is so situated that she 
does not have to work. Nothing to do but to amuse 
herself. She has no zest in life, no interest in any- 
thing. She is a bunch of selfishness and whines at 
everything. Whining has become such a habit with , 
her that her most casual remark is tinged with al 
whine. She is miserable herself and makes everybodyj 
else in her presence miserable. She is a weakling, a] 
parasite, a drag, a heavy weight on somebody all the-j 
time. 

Get the whine out of your voice or it will stop the] 
development and growth of your body. It will nar- 



the: inc3I_e:nook. 



45 



row and shrink your mind. It will drive away your 
friends ; it will make you unpopular. Quit your whin- 
ing : brace up ; go to work ; be something : stand for 
something ; fill your place in- the universe. Instead of 
whining around, exciting only pity and contempt, face 
about and make something of yourself. ' Reach up to 
the stature of a strong, ennobling manhood, to the 
beauty and strength of a superb womanhood. 

There is nothing the matter with you. Just quit 
vour whining and go to work. — Medical Talk. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
ENDLESS POSSIBILITIES IN A POTATO. 



this precaution may result in ruined ceilings, furniture 
and carpets. — Philadelphia Times. 
♦ * ♦ 
WHY DON'T YOU USE OLIVE OIL ? 



A SPIDER may be made of a large French prune, us- 
ing a large raisin for the head. At one-third the dis- 
tance of the length of the prune tie a yellow string to 
indicate the segments of the body. On the under side 
tie eight fish bones, four on each side, in imitation of 
the Vvalking members. From the raisin head two 
hornlike appendages should protrude. These may be 
of the pointed ends of toothpicks. 

A lemon makes a comical miniature pig, providing 
it has a prominent base for a snout. Slash the mouth, 
push in a couple of cloves for eyes, pin on ears cut 
from onion skin, twist another piece of onion skin 
for a tail ; then insert the toothpicks for legs, and you 
will have a pig. 

There is no end to the possibilities that lie dormant 
in a potato, and a little practice will enable the experi- 
menter to make all sorts of amusing souvenirs which 
may be fastened on a name card, with an appropriate 
quotation, or merely placed beside a plate on a paper 
doily. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
GOOD TO KNOW. 



That a pinch of salt on the white of an egg before 
beating will make it beat in very much less time than 
is usually required. 

That an old-time remedy for earache is equal parts 
of laudanum and tincture of arnica mixed together ; 
dip a piece of wool in this and insert it in the ear. 

That a tempting dainty to serve at a luncheon can 
be made by dipping oblong crackers in melted sweet 
chocolate; place on a buttered plate until firm and dry. 

That it is a good plan when you close the house while 
you go on your vacation to place bits of cotton soaked 
with oil of cedar at intervals along the baseboard to 
keep out the moths. 

That it is economical to keep a pint jar in the bath 
room in which can be put scraps of toilet soap ; when 
the jar is full pour over the pieces about a cupful of 
warm water and two teaspoonfuls of glycerine. The 
result will be a jelly-like consistency that can be used 
instead of ordinary soap. 

That water should be turned of? before closing the 
house for the summer vacation. Failure to remember 



Olive oil is cheap in Italy, and the poor people 
use it in place of butter. A tablespoonful of oil costs 
no more than two tablespoonfuls of butter. Pota- 
toes, sardines, bananas, anything we fry, are much 
better cooked in oil. 

In a puree of beans, tomatoes or peas a tablespoon- 
ful of oil added just before it is poured into the tureen 
gives a velvet}^ smoothness without grease. 

With flour use oil for the base of a tomato, cream 
or brown sauce most delicious of all ; when making 
a scalloped dish, toss the crumbs which are to form 
the top layer in a tablespoonful of hot oil. Thev make 
a brown and crisp crust. 

♦ ♦ * 
GRASS WIDOWS. 

The term grass widow is said to be derived frorh 
the old English custom of hanging out a broom when 
a man's wife was absent. 

To hang out the broom became a common phrase, 
the meaning being that the house had been swept clear 
of the wife's presence and the husband's friends were 
welcome and at liberty to do as they pleased. Later 
the husbands hung out a bunch of grass, and so be- 
came known as " grass widowers " and their wives 

as " grass widows." 

.♦. ^ ^ 

SAILORS FOND OF CANDY. 



Sailors are very fond of sweet things, and to one 
who knows little about them it is surprising to learn 
the quantity of candy they consume. In the ship's 
store are kept buckets of this article, which is one of 
the chief commodities, in exchange for which a sailor 
parts with his pocket money. On large ships several 
thousand pounds of candy are frequently consumed 
on a cruise. 

<^ ■* * 

The Romans had a temple to the god Janus. When 
Rome was at war the gates of the temple of Janus were 
left open ; when Rome was at peace the gates were 
closed. Under Augustus, the first emperor, the gates 
of Janus were closed for the third time in seven hun- 
dred years, and peace was over all the world, there 
was pax Roniana, the Roman peace. The poets of the 
empire rejoiced that Rome, by arms and war, had fi- 
nally wooed and married peace. 
^ * * 

A realistic turtle may be made out of a prune, 
with head, tail, and feet of cloves, pushed in at the 
proper points. 



46 



xhe: ingleinook. 



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BE KIND AND TRUE. 



Be kind, little maiden, be kind; 

In life's busy way you will find 

There is always room for a girl who smiles 

And with loving service the hour beguiles; 

A lass who is thoughtful as she is fair. 

And for others' wishes has a care; 

Who is quick to see when the heart is sad. 

And is loving and tender to make it glad; 

Who loves her mother and lighten.^ her cares, 

And many a household duty shares; 

Who is kind to the aged and kind to the young, 

And laughing and merry and full of fun; 

There is always love for a girl who is sweet. 

Always a smile her smile to greet; 

Then be kind, little maiden, be kind. 

Be true, little laddie, be true, 

From your cap to the sole of your shoe, 

Oh, we love a lad with an honest eye, 

Who scorns deceit and hates a lie; 

Whose spirit is brave, and whose heart is pure. 

Whose smile is open, whose promise sure; 

Who makes his mother a friend so near. 

He'll listen to nothing she may not hear; 

Who's his father's pride and his sister's joy — 

A hearty, thorough, and manly boy; 

Who loves on the playground a bat and ball. 

But will leave fun bravely at duty's call; 

Who's as pleasant at work as he is at play, 

And takes a step upward with each new day; 

Then be true, little laddie, be true. 

— Unidentified. 
-5. •:• * 

HOW GEORGE GOT EVEN. 



It was Freddie's birthday. He was three years old, 
and Cousin George had come to visit him. George 
was six, and a great deal larger than Freddie. 

The two played pleasantly till a lady gave Freddie 
two peaches for a birthday treat. 

Georgie wanted the larger one. " No," said Fred- 
die ; it's my birthday and course I ought to have the 
biggest. Mrs. Jones said so." 

His mamma, hearing the dispute, came to the door 
to ask the cause. " Yes," she said, " Mrs. Jones said 
the larger one was Freddie's, but I do not want my 
little boy to be selfish." 

Freddie at once handed the peach to Georgie, saying : 
" You may have it, Georgie, 'cause you're company." 

Georgie was ashamed to have his auntie know how 
selfish he had been, and he said crossly, " Keep your 
old peach, Tattlctale ; but I'll get even with you, see 
if I don't." 

.After a time the trouble seemed to have been for- 



gotten, and the two children were playing quietly 
again. 

Georgie was sitting in the swing, and he said to 
Freddie, " Slap me in the face, just for fun," 

" No," said Freddie, " that would be naughty." 

"Yes, do; I like to be slapped." 

" I don't want to," was Freddie's answer. 

But Georgie coaxed till Freddie gave him a little 
bit of a slap on the cheek, when Georgie raised his 
hand and struck his little cousin very hard. 

Hurt and frightened, he ran to his mamma, crying", 
" Georgie slapped me! " 

" He slapped me first. Didn't you, Freddie? " said 
Georgie ; and Freddie, too frightened to explain, said 
" Yes." 

" Why, Freddie ! " said mamma ; " did my boy slap 
his visitor? I am so ashamed." 

And Georgie ran home laughing because Freddie 
was disgraced. 

He thought himself very smart — what do ynu think? 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
AN INTERNAL DIFFICULTY. 



Little Archie Richards, at the close of the Thanks- 
giving dinner, sat at the table with his face suffused 
with tears. His mother was greatly troubled. With 
a sweet smile and with gentle intonation she put one 
arm around her little baby boy and asked, — 

" What is it mamma's little darling wants ? '' 

But " mamma's little darling " continued to cry. 

Mamma made another effort to find out the trouble. 

" Does mamma's baby boy want some more cake? " 
she asked. 

" No'm," said the child, while the tears continued to 
flow. 

"Does he want some more pie?" she further in- 
quired. 

" No'm," he further replied. 

■' Well," said the mother, making a last effort to 
reach his case, " tell mamma what baby wants." 

The little boy managed somehow to say between 

sobs, " I wants some of this out I've got in." — Li[>pin- 

cott's. 

♦ ♦ •:• 

DEFINED. 



Who is wise? He who can learn from everybody. 
\\"ho is strong? He who can control his passions. 
Wlio is rich? He who is satisfied with his lot. Who 
is honorable? He who honors others. — Nezv York 

\'C-lVS. 



the: inglenook 



47 



A/^ 






t 



What is the pay of a stenographer? 

Stenographers' pay varies from a few dollars a 
week up to twenty-five dollars a week. Hundreds of 
stenographers receive less than ten dollars a week, and 
plenty of them can be had in the city of Chicago for 
half that. The reason for this condition of things lies 
in the fact that the business colleges turn out no end 
of stenographers, especially girls who have a home 
in which to live, and what they earn is simply so much 
gain, and the number of them has reduced wages to 
such an extent as to make it hardly worth while. 
The stenographer who understands typewriting and 
can write good English and does not need to be 
watched all the time, is pretty sure of a fairly good 
position, but these are by no means common. 



What makes cast iron so brittle? 

Common cast iron cools in crystalline form, making 
crystals of greater or less size. These separate readily 
along their lines of cleavage, and this makes the iron 
brittle. Wrought iron is passed through a series of 
rolls and the crystals are rolled out into long strings 
or threads. In _the course of time, under certain con- 
ditions, such as jarring the iron, these fibers break up 
and reassemble in crystalline form and every piece of 
wrought iron, or steel, that breaks shows a crystalline 
fracture. The rolled-out fiber condition of the 
wrought iron is an unnatural one and the tendency is 
to get back into the shape of the individual crystals 
massed together. 

♦ 

What is the pay of a bookkeeper? 

A bookkeeper's pay is dependent very largely upon 
what kind of books he keeps and for what company. 
The head bookkeepers of a railroad will receive a very 
handsome sum of money. An ordinary bookkeeper 
in a common business house or a store receives but a 
comparatively small amount. There can be no an- 
swer to this question, because the conditions vary. 
However, this may be stated, the world is full of 
people who can keep books and the supplv is greater 
than the demand. 

* 

What is touch typewriting? 

Touch typewriting is using a typewriter without 
having the keys lettered, working it as a musician plays 
on a piano without reference to their number or letter 
on the key. It is lather an easy accomplishment, but 
it takes considerable practice at first. 



Why does most of the real cold weather come out of 
the Northwest? 

Because, outside of the atmospheric layer, and the 
higher up in the air, the colder it is. This cold " boils 
downward," owing to the rotation of the earth, in 
the Northwest of this side of the world, and passes 
toward the South carrying intense cold with it. Out- 
side of the earth, say five hundred miles away, the cold 
is absolute and beyond comprehension. 

In a recent Inglenook it was stated that steel is nothing 
but iron with a per cent of carbon mixed in. Might not 
this per cent be accidentally hit sometimes in an ordinarjf 
furnace? 

It is believed by those who have made a study of 
it that occasionally a run of supposed pig iron made 
by the old charcoal process was really pure steel. The 
right amount of carbon got into the iron and made 
steel. 

What is the meaning of the name Ste. Marie, and of 
Sault Ste. Marie? 

The word Sault is French and is applied to the 
rapids in St. Mary's river between Lakes Huron and 
Superior. It is defined as a leap. Ste. is an abbrevi- 
ation for Sainte and is the French feminine for saint. 
Marie is the French for Mary. The proper pro- 
nunciation is " sant maree." 

* 

Would a tree kept in cold storage retain its vitality con- 
tinuously? 

No, it would finally dry out and become a dead stick. 
But it can be made to hold out for a year or so in a 
damp, cold place. There is no such thing as perpetual 
life. 

* 

Why are the great plains treeless? 
Because wet makes vegetation and the Rocky moun- 
tains head off the clouds from the Pacific coast. The 
rain falls on the Pacific side of the range. It will 
never be otherwise unless the earth shifts in its orbit. 

Do evergreen trees shed their leaves? 

Yes, they do. But they are coming on and falling 
off all the time in spring and summer. Look under 
the pine tree and note the needles lying there. 

* 

What does radium look like? 

Like common salt. All there is in the world would 
go into a very small teacup. 



48 



THI 



INGLEINOOK. 



LITERARY. 



llverybody's Magazine for January is at hand with 
its usual list of good things. It would be a difficult 
thing to say which one of the numerous ten-cent maga- 
zines is the best, but if anyone should happily blunder 
on Everybody's, it is certain that he has made no mis- 
take. It is more than an ordinary matter to con- 
duct a monthly magazine intended for the masses and 
so to handle it as to continually advance its interests 
numerically and financially. The managers of Every- 
body's have succeeded in doing this beyond a question. 
There is not much to be gained by going over the list 
of contents as one magazine is very much like those of 
the same class, but there is a nameless finish and an in- 
definable spirit of completeness that pervades Every- 
body's that is wanting in a good many others of its 
class, fit erybody's for January is no exception to the 
rule that has hitherto marked this successful magazine. 
^« *^ >*, 

CADDY SHOWS GRATITUDE. 



.\ CERTAIN Liverpool insurance manager went as 
usual to play golf the other afternoon. The caddy was 
very ragged and it appealed to the tender heart of the 
insurance man. 

Presently he found by deft questioning that the 
boy was hungry, too ; so he gave the lad the inevitable 
something and bade him go at once and get food. 

When the game was over he asked the lad to come 
with him to his house and take one of the insurance 
manager's old suits, and this the boy gratefully did. 

Bit by bit the kindly manager wormed from him 
the story of his dependent mother, and before the lad 
had finished it was decided to send a load of coal and 
a round of beef to the mother. 

The lad'p eyes were full of tears. He wished to 
say something in the kindly direction, but it was evi- 
dent that he could not fashion his thoughts into words. 
■' Please, sir." he began. _ 

" Oh, nonsense, my lad ! Don't mention it. Be 
a good lad, that's all." 

Then the caddy could no longer restrain himself. 
Tlie kindly thought which was at the bottom of his 
heart broke through : 

" Please, sir, I'm so sorry that you are such a bad 
player ! " — Cassell's Journal. 

* <J* ♦ 

THE WOMAN'S ISSUE OF THE INGLENOOK. 



In a short time we expect to issue a number of the 
Inglenook every line of which will be written by 
women. Contributions are invited. Writers may 
choose their own subjects and handle them in their 
own way. They should be short, not more than a 
column in length and to the point. A few special 



articles will be asked for and these should be sent at 
once. 

Parties who want extra copies of this Inglenook 
should ask for them in time. A woman's issue of the 
Inglenook some years ago fell fifteen hundred short 
in the number wanted over the regular issue. We did 
not know what the demand would be and did not 
print beyond the regular issue. Those who want 
sample copies should make it known now. They can- 
not be furnished after the issue is printed. 

Let those who contribute to this number make their 
articles spicy, brief and pointed. Let them be worth 
the reading. The Inglenook women are among the 
best of its readers and can make a number that will 
be read by everybody. The editor knows this be- 
cause they have already done it. He supposes they 
can do it the second time and he is in no doubt 
about the result. 

Neither age nor distance or whether subscriber to the 
Inglenook or not will cut any figure. Strength and 
life are wanted in the articles, not length. If you 
want to get your article in get it ready and send it 
to the Editor of the Inglenook. 

The issue will come a few weeks later than the 

present Writing. 

{. ^« .J. 

A QUERY. 



There has been a call through the Inglenook office 
for information as to where the finer grades of white 
clay are to be found. Will someone who knows write 
the editor about it? It may be to his advantage. 

* ♦ ♦ 
What do we live for if not to make life less difficult 
for each other ? — George Eliot. 



Want Advertisements. 



Wanted. — An old man who wants a home can find 
such a place by addressing the Editor of the Ingle- 
nook, Elgin, III. 

Wanted. — A girl about ten or twelve years of age, 
of good family, for a home in Dakota. Address, the 
Editor of the Ikglenook. 

Wanted. — A good Brother farmer with team to 
work a iSO-acre farm — fifty acres in orchard. Ad- 
dress 5. Z. Sharp, Fruita, Colo. The above is a good 
chance for a man with a boy or two. 

» 

Wanted, in a good North Missouri town, a com- 
petent blacksmith. Good wages, good country, cli- 
mate, church privileges, etc. A brother preferred. — 
D. A. Moats, Polo, Mo. 



the: inql-enook. 



IFOR RENT! 
t - - t 



Tliree choice grain and stock 
farms, near Woodstock. Mc- 
Henry County. Illinois; i6o 
acres at $3.25 per acre. 400 acres 
at $2.25 per acre, and 440 acres 
at $2 per acre. Special terms to 
reliable tenaiit. Will divide the 
land to suit. ."Xgent. 

R. A. CANTERBURY, 
15s La Salle St. Chicago. 



2tf M-..' ■ -v ■>...■ ^.-nn. 



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INDIA==A PROBLEM 



By W. B. STOVER 



Is one of the best selling books ever put out by the House. It 
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our Missionaries are doing, and the difficulties they have to contend 
with. 

Any one, after reading this book, will have a splendid idea of 

India and Her Customs. 

Also will want to do more to lift her people out of sin and degra- 
dation 

Agents are reporting large sales of books, and if you want to 
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The book, in cloth binding, sells for Si. 25; morocco, S2.00. 



Brethren Publishing: House, 



Elgin. Illinois. 



the: ingleinook. 



Falls City, Nebs. ^^ 

S. B. Fahnestock. Sec, McPherson, Kansas. ^^ 

Dear Bro: — After greetings to you, . . '. I am very glad to hear of the large ^ 

enrollment at the college this year. I hope and pray that you will have a glorious and ^^ 

prosperous year. ^ 

My eight children have all been at McPherson College, and are now all in the ^_ 

church. May the good Lord help us to hold out faithful to the end. ^ 

I do not say it to flatter you, but say it because it is true, that the McPherson ^f 

College is sending out a great influence for good in the western country, and by coming *^ 

in contact with those of other schools I am convinced that McPherson College excels. ^^ 

So I bid you Godspeed. Go on in the good work. You are sowing good seed. ^^ 

Though clouds may rise and sometimes the future may look dark, yet press onward and ^^ 

upward, your work is telling. ^ 

Yours fraternally, ^^ 
George Peck. ^ 

McPherson College, Kansas, emphatically the people's college. Everybody is ad- ^ 

mitted on the basis of character, without examination. ^ 

The school stands for the brotherhood of man. The doors stand wide open for the ^f 

American youth who are destined to direct the afTairs of the church and country. We ^ 

educate the head, the heart and the hand. Do not attend a college for the purpose of ^f 

learning how to get money without earning it. Attend for the purpose of becoming ^ 

stronger and nobler; to become more efficient in preaching and practicing the gospel of ^^ 

service. ^ 

Enrollment over jfjo and still they come. Wake up. Here is a chance. If you ^ 

don't want us to knock at your door with a battering ram, write us at once. ^ 

We still want some students to do work for part expenses. McPherson College is ^ 

'ioing well in numbers, in Christian education and in character building. ^ 

Mcpherson college, McPherson, Kansas. ^ 






lINMflLER MADE . . 
MATURES CURE 







-• WILiCURE TMC 

; WORST NERva-:Hc:MCM£- 

iHFBOM OrtirJf..: JTL. 



A $1.00 Pocket Inhaler for 
Only 25 Cents. 

Consists of medicated air treatment, 
curing Headache, Catarrh, Cold in the 
Head, Sore Throat and Toothache. Very 
convenient to use and good for three years' 
service. Price, 25 cents each or 5 for $1.00, 
postpaid. 



The 
Little Gem 

Lung Tester and 
Developer is 

something every- 
body should use 
freely. Strengthens 
and develops the 
lungs as no medi- 
cine can possibly 
do. Children find 
great delight in 
using; this novelty, 
and the more they 

_ _ use it, the stronger 

^^■^^^^^^"^^^ and healthier they 
will be. Its continued use prevents sickness 
colds, weak lungs and consumption. Regis- 
ters accurately the exact lung capacity of 
each individual, and with proper care will 
last several years. Each instrument well 
made, neat and attractive. A bout 5 inches 
long. Price, 2s cents each or 5 foi Si. 00. 
postpaid. Address all orders to 




SAVE YOUR HAIR 

Dr. H. F. Knoblauch's 

GERMAN HAIR TONIC 

Is positively known to cure baldness in from 
three to si.\ months: restore gray hair to its 
natural color in three weeks; remove dandruff 
in four applications; stop hair from falling out 
and cure all diseases of the scalp. It is no dye 
and is positively harmless. Every bottle guar- 
anteed. 50-cent and Si .00 sizes. Sent by express 
to any address upon receipt of price. Express 
charges prepaid in lots of three Si. 00 bottles or 
more. Agents wanted. 

THOMAS BROTHERS, 

44 N. Clark St., Chicago, 111. 



It4 



■ INOLKNOOK ■ 



H. 



E. NEWCOMER, 

I\rt. Morris, 111. 



52.2,5,8,11 Mention tlie INfiLKNOniC when writing. 

FRUIT TREES! 

Complete Assortment Small Fruits, Roses, 
Shrubbery, Evt-rgreens, etc. Clean, strong, 
healthy stock, well rooted. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction. Club raisers wanted in every neigh- 
borhood. Special inducements now. Write for 
terms and prices. 48113 

E. MOHLER. Plattsburg, Mo. 

Mention Irio i.m;1 KNODK when wtiting 



DF-Ort 



Stock of hardware and store building in a 
good North Dakota tpwn. Doing a good busi- 
ness and it will increase rapidly as the country 
settles up. This is a good farming country 
and we have no competition, and a good chance 
for some one to build up a large trade. There 
is a large congregation of German Baptists at 
this place and they also have a church here. 
Our stock is all new and will invoice about 
$2,500. The building and lots at $1,600. 
Will sell at a bargain if taken at once. 

Address : 

McCUTCHlN & SON, 

it4 SURREY, NORTH DAKOTA. 

Hemion the INGLKNOOK when writing. 



CAP GOODS 

We have sold cap goods by mail for nearly six 
years. Each year the volume of our business has 
increased. This steady growth is the best evi- 
dence that the thoasands ol sisters who are buy- 
ing goods of us ate well pleased. A trial order 
will convince you that our line is unexcelled either 
in quality or price. Send for free samples and a 
booklet of testimonials. 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, Illinois. 

Itiapow Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



NEW CURE FOR 

Catarrh 



SENT ON TRIAL FREE. 




WHY SUFFER LONGER 



When a Positive Cure is at Your 
Command and only Await- 
ing a Trial ? 



Don't take medicines in tlie stom- 
ach to kill germs of Catarrh in the 
head. Nothing but air can reach the 
home of these germs, and when it is 
medicated by passing through the 
Inhaler, the germs are completely 
destroyed. Cures Catarrh, Head 
Colds, Bronchitis, Headache, La 
Grippe and all diseases of the air 
passages yield as if by magic. 

No Money Wanted. 

I will mail any readers of the In- 
glenook one of my new Co-ro-na 
Medicators, with medicine for a 
quick home cure, on FIVE days trial 
free. If it gives satisfaction, send 
me $1.00 (half price),, if not, return it 
at the expired time, which will only 
cost you 3 cents postage, and you 
will not owe me a penny. Write to- 
day. Agents wanted. Address: 

E. J. WORST, 
10 Main St., Ashland, Ohio. 

It4 Mention tlie I.NCl.KNUOK \%lieii wrttiRK. 



I 



I 



Several Handsome Premiums. 



One of the things that nearly everybody wants, and certainly everybody finds occasion to use from 
time to time, is. a fountain pen. Now the Inglenook has a number of Laughiin Fountain Pens, in both 
ladies' and gentlemen's style. These pens are advertised and sold by the thousands, and readers of high- 
priced magazines ha\'e often seen them ad\'ertistd. They come in boxes, accompanied by an arrange- 
ment to fill them with ink; have a gold pen, and they are as fine a Fountain Pen as you will likeh' find 
anywhere for the money. These pens sell for one dollar, and we will make you a present of one if you get 
two new subscribers for the Inglenook. 




Almost any Nooker can get two of his neighbors to take the Inglenook for ayear and get, for his 
trouble, one of these beautiful and effective Fountain Pens. Remember, that for two new subscribers you 
will get the pen. 

Where is the boy, or man or woman for that matter, who does not need a knife? Now, it so hap- 
pens, that we have in our possession a number of well-made pocket knives which we intend to give away 
to our friefids. Anybody who sends in one new subscriber will recei\'e by return mail, for his trouble, this 
substantial pocket-knife. The Inglenook editor has carried one of these around with him all over the 
United States, or that part of it which he has visited in the interest of the Nook family. It is a strong 






knife and one that will last for many a year. It is made by the Lawton Company, of Chicago, and on re- 
ceipt of one new subscriber, which any present Nooker will get, we will remember him with a pocket- 
knife that will last him a good part of a lifetime, if he does not lose it. We do not guarantee against loss 
but we will guarantee this knife to be a good one. This knife would sell for 50 cents in a regular store. 

Now every woman likes to have a knife just 
as well as a boy or man and she can put it 
to more usage than any man or boy would 
ever think of doing. To provide for her we have a beautiful little pearl-handled knife with two blades, 
just such a knife as a lady would like to ha\e and will cost at least 75 cents if bought at a hardware store. 

Now whoever sends in two new subscribers for the Inglenook is going to get one of these knives. 
It is a stout, well-built knife, big enough for any purpose for which a penknife ma)'' be used, and our guar- 
antee with this is, that after you get it if you lose it you will be sorry. 

Now, furthermore, suppose you start out to get new subscribers for the Inglenook, and nobody 
knows how to talk it up better than those who have read it, and you are one of them. Suppose you g-et 
one new subscriber, that means a knife for jourself if you happen to be of a masculine persuasion. 

Supposing that you find it easy to get another subscriber, you have a chance to get the Fountain 
Pen; and if you get two more, making four in all, you can have the Ladies' Knife and the Fountain Pen, 
both of them handy things to have about. Do the best you can, and that is the best done by beginning 
right away. The knives and pens are ready for you and will be sent from this ofifice on receipt of the 
subscriptions. 



ESlsiii, Illinois- 



THE INGLEINOOK. 





Enreka Indestructible Post 

Cheapas cedar. 
Made where 
ggSSfetiSSisss^as^ used. N t> 
n n III freight to pay. 

Great inducements to agents. For terms, etc.. 
address with stamp, 
36t3t; W. A. DICK BY, North Manchester. Ind. 

The Home (iem !'^!'."8 

^^^,,^,,,,^^^,^^,,,^^^ Machine. 

The accompanying cut repre- 
sents the washer with the lid 
and new style agitator laid back 
1 claim much for this agitator, 
which my circular explains, as 
well as the entire machine. 

The tub is made of Virginia 
white cedar. Do not decide on 
a machine before reading my circular, which will 
be sent free on application. Thirty days' trial 
will be allowed and if the machine does not prove 
satisfactory in every respect I will pay the freight 
both ways. Address: 

WM. S. MILLER, 
43113 Meyersdale, Pa. 

SENT ON APPROVAL 

to Responsible People 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pen ■ 

Guaranteed Finest Grade 
i4lt. Solid Gold Pen. 

To test the merits of the 
Inglenook as an advertis- 
ing medium we offer your 
choice of 




■■jigr^ 



iSl.OO 



These 
Two 
Pop 
Styles; 
For Only 



1.00 

I Postpaid 

I to any 

^Bl Address. 



m 



44t26 



(by registered mail S cents 
extra. )\ 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. gold pen, 
any flexibility desired — ink 
feeding device perfect. 

Either style — Kichly 
Gold Mounted for pre- 
sentation purposes, $1.00 
extra. 

Qrand Special Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week, if you do not hnd it 
as represented, fully as 
fine a value as yon can se- 
cure for three times the 
price in any other makes, 
if not entirely satisfactory 
in every respect return it 
and we will send you $1.10 
for it. the additional ten 
cents is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
pen. 

Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right, Gentlemen's style. 

Lay this iDglenook 
down and write NOW 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold- 
er sent free of charge with 
each Pen. 

ADDRESS 

Laughlin Mfg. Co. 

970 Grlswold St., 
DETROIT, - MICH. 

Mention the INiJLENOOK when writing 



■ { ■ . ! ■ ■ ! ■ - t , ■;, ■ { . -t , 1 , ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ . t . . t . . 1 . -t. » » - t - » ■ ! ■ » » - t - t • ! ' • ! • - t ■ ! ■ - t ' t ■ ! ■ * • ! ■ - I - * • ! ■ - V > V * > V > H - ' V ' I - • ! • ■ ! < - t » ■ ! ■ I - » * ' I ' - V f 



The Qospel Messenger 



lA 16-Page Weekly^ 



Devoted entirely to the interests of the Brethren church 
and the cause of Christ. It contains spicy articles on 
live topics written by the ablest thinkers and writers in 
the church. If you are not familiar with it, drop us a 
card and we will take pleasure in mailing you a sample 
copy. 

Special Combination Offer. 

Gospel Messenger, one year, - = - = $150 f 
The Book '• Eternal Verities," by D. L. Miller, ^ticJ" 



■25 



BOTH rOOETHER, EITHER OLD 
OR NEW SUBSCRIBERS, . . . 



$1.75 



BRETHREN PUB ISHINQ HOUSE, 

ELGIN, ILLINOIS. 



- t > i - ' t' i ' ' t ' i- ■!■ - t ■ ! ' » i - ' t ' > 4>» ^ < » -I' * i< 1- ' t < • ! ' 1 ' - t - - i - v i - * i - * - t » » - t' » i < * * * i > - t * * i- * - t - * ■ ! ■ i- * * * * 



The Busy Man's Friend... 




Here is a book for you. The Busy 
Man's Friend is a book that we give away. 
It is not very large. You can carry it in 
your coat pocket, but it is full, from cover 
to cover, of things that every man ought to 
know. It is made up of the odds and ends 
cf information in regard to everyday knowl- 
edge, such as matters of legal interest, 
measurement of buildings, and rules of ac- 
rion generally Just what you want to 
know and don't know where t« 6nd it. 
It is all in the Busy Man's Friend, the 
book that we give away. Thousands and 
thousands of them have been put out to 
the entire satisfaction of those who got 
them. Have you had yours yet? If not 
here is the way you can get it: Send us the 
name of one netv subscriber to the Ingle- 
nook Magazine, remitting $i.oo with your 
order, and we will send you the book free 
of charge for your trouble and also place 
the new name on the mailing list from now 
on until the end of the year 1904. 

You may be a busy man yourself. If so, 
you want a friend of like tastes. That ift 
the book, for The Busy Man's Friend con- 
tains just what you want to know without 
wasting your time looking it up in other 
places. Sec that you get that book as foon 
as the mails can brin? it to you. 



Brethren Publishing House, 

Elgin, Illinois. 



HI 



INGL-EINOOK. 



THE COLONY 



WHEN YOU ARE ALL BOUND 
UP, 



.ON. 



LAGUNA DE TACUE GRANT 



.IN THE... 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
F. Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of 1901 
and were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 

1902, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19, 1902, a Brethren church was organized with a membership of 13 
There are now 54 members. 

May II, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8. 

1903. the building shown above was completed and on July 12, 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by forty in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
they will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
ister is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all 
is here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies of Cali- 
fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
forty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
day in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
newspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

5ltT3 Menlion the IXnLENOOK when ^mting 



And are suFfcring frum indiges- 
tion, lack of aijpetite, foul Ijreath, 
headache, d3spe[jsia, catarrh of the 
stomach, kithiey and liver C(jm- 
plaints 3-011 need a tonic laxative, 
something that will move the 
bowels quickly, easily and with- 
out leaving hurtful effects behind. 
Never use a purgative or cathar- 
tic. They weaken the bowels and 
system and make the disease 
worse. L'se instead Vernal Saw 
Palmetto Berry Wine. It tones, 
builds up, gives new strength and 
vigor, not alone to the bowels but 
to the whole being. Only one 
small dose a day will cure any 
case, from the lightest to the 
worst. That means cure, not 
simply relief only. Most obsti- 
nate cases }ield gently and easil}' 
and the cure is permanent. Ver- 
nal Saw Palmetto Berry AVine is 
not a patent medicine. A list of 
ingredients is in every package 
with explanation of their action. 
Write us for a free sample bottle. 
Vernal Remedy Co., 1x5 Seneca 
Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 

All leading druggists sell it. " 

Mention the INGLKNOOK when writing. 



FREE SAMPLE 

1 Send letteror postal for tree SAMPLE 

HINDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
(or BOc, or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
hannless. Address Milford Drug Co., Milford, 
indiana,_We answer all letters. 

5Itl^ mention the IXGLENOOK when writing. 



Old Trusty ^> — 
^Incubator 

Guaj^fvteed Five YeaLfs. 30 DaLys Tria.1. 

It is the result of a life given to the study of in- 
cubators and practical work as a manufacturer. 
None of the weaknesses of the 
old and many new improve- 
ments. A dependable hatcher. 
An oil saver. "Write .ind get J ohnson's 
new book. It's Free and worth hav- 
ing if you ever owned or expect to o\vn 
chickens. Write the incubator man, 
M.M.Johnson, Clay Center, Neb. 




Mention in 




In the Injjlenook 

There is always room for wide- 
awake advertisers, who can appre- 
ciate the superior advantages of 
our journal. Write us. 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 

■File AXct.iX Ordex- ^Zoiaaie. 

333-335 Dearborn St., "That's the Pi»ce." CHICAGO, ILL. 



_v ^^ J ,*,- 1^ j_f i jv try j4 j-t The ciiistant increase in the volume of orders that we are receivin-^ daily from the readers of the Inglenook 

X O ^^tlr* ^^r*A^nQO proves to us that we have made a friend of everyone that has patronized vis during the past year. We 

— appreciate this confidence in us very much and shall always endeavor 10 handle our business in a manner 

that Will prove us worthy of the same. We guarantee every article to be exactly as represented and will replace any that are not satisfactory, or will refund 
the money sent us. together with transportation charges. Your orders will be given very careful attention and will be tilled promptly. 




Alarm Clock that Does Alarm! 

The accompanying cut 
is a small illustration 
of our Parlor Alarm 
Clock. This beauti- 
ful clock is made 
with a cast iron ca.se, 
K^nn metal finish.and 
las scroll ornamen- 
tation, as shown in the 
illustration. The 
alarui bell is skillfully 
concealed in the base 
of the clock and has an 
extremely long and 
^ loud ring.making it a 
sure a nr a k e n e r. 
The movement is the very best and is guaran- 
teed for two years. Will run thirty hours 
without winding. If you forget to wind it at 
night it will be running the ne.tt morning. It is 
dutt proof and practically indestructible. 
Iti3tu!Iy worth five ordinary alarms, being the 
most durable and substantial ever offered. 
5H inches high, weighs 3% pounds, and tt AA 
wii: be shipped bv express upon receipt of ^(l«VW 



Complete 
Set of 
Table 

Silverware, 

$2i5 



27 PIECES-G knives, 6 forks, 6 
tablespoons, 6 teaspoons. 1 butter knife, 1 
sugar shell, I picklefork, of the ROGERS' 
STERLING BRAND, finest coin silver 
plate, in a fine, satin-lined, brocaded 
velvet case, exactly as shown in the small 
illustration. This offer is genuine, and we 
guarantee satisfaction absolutely, and will re- 
turn yodr naoney if you do not find the goods 
exactly as represented. Over 200 of these 
sets now in use in 'Nookers' homes, and all 
giving satisfaction. The set weighs about 7 
pounds and will be shipped by express on re- 
ceipt of t2.6S from readers of the Inglenook. 

Alamlnum Salt & Pepper Shaker. 

Two pieces, each 2': inches 
high, ijA inches in diameter, ex- 
actly as shown in the illustration, 
made of solid alniuinuxu. 
satin Huisli and polished^ sim- 
ilar in appearance to sterling sil- 
ver. Fitted with bevel tops, 
which are always Recure, yet 
easily removed for filling. Use- 
ful and ornamental. Our spe- 
cial offer to Nook readers. One 
set sent postpaid with our ^A/» 
catalogue for mUv 

I'his Wagon Jack is made 
entirely of Iron, is easy to 
operate and is self-locking 
and self-adjusting. The 
hundreds of satisfied cus- 
tomers that are now using it 
proves it to be the most per- 
fect Wagon Jack made. It 
^ weighs 8 pounds and will lifi 
S.ooo pounds. Price, 65 cents 





Table Cutlery 

In order to meet the many inquiries we have 
received from the reader? of tlie Inglenook 
we submit the following offers of Table Cut- 
lery. This cutlery is the very best to be had 
and cannot be duplicated for the same money 
elsewhere. The forks and blades are of the 
best steel, finished in the best of workmanship, 
and are not case hardened iron as is usually 
offered. If ordered by mail send 35 cents ex- 
tra per eet. 

A 38. — Single bolster, straight steel Itlade, 
cocobolo handle, set of 6 knives and 6 forks 
for 83 cents 

A 39. — Same as above, with black ebony 
handles, 99 cents 

A 40. — Single bolster, scimeter steel blade, 
just as illustrated, cocobolo handle, set of 6 
knives and 6 forks, for 96 cents 

A 41. — Same as A 40 but black ebony han- 
dle, $1.10 



.'\ 42.^Double bolster, straight steel blade, 
cocobolo handle. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks 
lor 98 cents 

A 43. — Double bolster, Scimeter steel blade, 
cocobolo handle — just as illustrated. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks for $1.00 



A 44.— ^Single bolster, straight steel blade, 
oval swell cocobolo handle. Set 6 Knives and 
6 Forks for $1.00 

.\ 45. — Same as above, but Scimeter blade, 
$1.14 



A 46. — Double lap bolster, Scimeter blade, 
polished oval swell cocobolo handle. The very 
best to be had. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks 
for ■■■?'-57 

Kitchen Knife Set 




Special Handkerchief Safe 

A-4S. — Genuine 
linen 12 x 12-incli la- 
dies' handkerchief 
with I inch fancy 
draw-n stitched bor- 
der trimmed " all 
around with one-half 
inch French Valen- 
ciennes edging. .\ 
very dainty article, 
as illustrated. Each, 
postpaid, ... 10 cents 

A 49. — Ladies scalloped edge silk embroid- 
I cred handkerchief. One corner with a hand- 
\ some floral design embroidered in silk in as- 
sorted colors. Per dozen, postpaid, .. .60 cents 





Comfortable Rocker 

r 



A 47. — Bread Knife, i Cake Knife and i 
Paring Knife, made of the best cold rolled 
nickeled steel and will give satisfaction. The 
handles are firmly swaged to the blades and 
will not come loose. Per set of three Knives, 
I 16 cents 




Large and roomy;- made of good stock; high 
ly polished; made in oak or elm; guaranteed 
the lowest priced comfort chair sold. Has 
high back and broad top slat; a bargain. 

.\ 50. — In oak $2.30 

.\ 51.— In elm $2.10 



Send all Orders to Albaugh, BfOS., Dovef & Co., 323=325 Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 



ftlKSLtNOOl^ 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




fln Oklahoma Vineyard. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



January 19, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 3, Volume VI 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



Falls City, Nebr. ^^ 

S. B. Fahnestock. Sec, McPherson, Kansas. gf • 

Dear Bio: — After greetings to you, . . . I am very glad to hear of the large ^• 

enrollment at ilie college this year. I hope and pray that you will have a glorious and ^' 

prosperous year. ^ • 

My eight children have all been at McPherson College, and are now all in the ^' 

church' May the good Lord help us to hold out faithful to the end. ^* 

I do not say it to flatter you, but say it because it is true, that the McPherson ^^ 

College is sending out a great influence for good in the western country, and by coming ^.. ■ 

in contact with those of other schools I am convinced that McPherson College excels. ^; 

So I bid you Godspeed. Go on in the good work. You are sowing good seed. ^* 

Though clouds may rise and sometimes the future may look dark, yet press onward and ^; 

upward, your work is telling. ^' 

Yours fraternally, ^; 

George Peck. ^" 

McPherson College, Kansas, emphatically the people's college. Everybody is ad- ^. 

mitted on the basis of character, without examination. ^: 

The school stands for the brotherhood of man. The doors stand wide open for the ^; 

American youth who are destined to direct the affairs of the church and country. We ^■ 

educate the head, the heart and the hand. Do not attend a college for the purpose of ^: 

learning how to get money without earning it. Attend for the purpose of becoming ^■ 

stronger and nobler; to become more efficient in preaching and practicing the gospel of 2; 

service. ^' 

Enrollment over S30 and still they come. Wake up. Here is a chance. If you ^^ 

don't want us to knock at your door with a battering ram, write us at once. ^. 

We still want some students to do work for part expenses. McPherson College is ^'• 

doing well in numbers, in Christian education and in character building. -^- 

Mcpherson college, McPherson, Kansas. g;| 



FRUIT TREES! 

Complete Assortment Small Fruits, Roses. 
Shrubbery, Evergreens, etc. Clean, strong, 
healthy stock, well rooted. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction. Club raisers wanted in every neigh- 
borhood. Special indiici.'nu-nts now. Write for 
terms and prict=;. 4^ti3 

E. MOHLER, Plattsburg, Mo. 

Mention Die INGLENOUK when writing. 



CHEAP RATES 

ON 

Household Goods and 

Personal Effects 

TO AND IFROM 

Colorado, California, Washioglon, 
Oregon, Utah, 

And All Principal Points West 



Through cars from Chicago with- 
out transfer orrehandling of goods 
en route. Write for rates. Map 
of California free on application. 
If not interested, kindly mention 
to friends who are. ^ 

Trans^Conttnental Freight Co., 

325 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

36 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

506 So. Broadway, Los Angeles. 

46tI3 Mcnlinn the INflLENOOK when wntins. 



SAVE JOIR HAIR 

Dr. H. F. Knoblauch's 

GERMAN HAIR TONIC 

Is positively known to cure baldness in from 
three to six months; restore gray hair to its 
natural color in three weeks; remove dandruff 
in four applications; stop hair from falling out 
and cure all diseases of the scalp. It is no dye 
and is positively harmless. Every bottle guar- 
anteed. 50-cent and $1 00 sizes. Sent by express 
to any address upon receipt of price. Express 
charges prepaid in lots of three Si.co bottles or 
more. Agents wanted. 

THOMAS BROTHERS, 
44 N. Clark St.. Chicago, 111. 



It4 



Mennon the INGLENOOK Mhei) writing. 



F-On. ^.AJL^^l ! 



NEW CURE FOR 

Catarrh 



SENT ON TRIAL FREE. 



Stock of hardware and store building in a 
good North Dakota town. Doing a good busi^ 
ness and it will increase rapidly as the country 
settles up. This is a good farming country 
and we have no competition, and a good chance 
for some one to build up a large trade. There 
is a large congregation of German Baptists at 
this place and they also have a church here. 
Our stock is all new and will invoice about 
$2,500. The building and lots at $1,600. 
Will sell at a bargain if taken at once. 

Address: 

McCUTCHIN & SON, 

it4 SURREY, NORTH DAKOTA. 

Mention the INGLKNOOK when writing. 



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Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, Illinois. 




WHY SUFFER LONGER 



When a Positive Cure is at Your 
Command and only Await- 
ing a Trial ? 



Don't take medicines in the stem 
ach to kill germs of Catarrh in the 
head. Nothing but air can reach the 
home of these germs, and when it is 
medicated by passing through the 
Inhaler, the germs are completely 
destroyed. Cures Catarrh, Head 
Colds, Bronchitis, Headache, La 
Grippe and all diseases of the air 
passages yield as if by magic. 

No Money Wanted. 

I will mail any readers of the In- 
glenook one of my new Co-ro-na 
Medicators, with medicine for a 
quick home cure, on FIVE days trial 
free. If it gives satisfaction, send 
me $1.00 (half price), if not, return it 
at the expired time, which will only 
cost you 3 cents postage, and you 
will not owe me a penny. Write to- 
day. Agents wanted. Address: 



1 



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Ind. 



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to Responsible People 

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Qrand Special Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week, if you do not nnd it 
as represented, fully as 
fine a value as yon can se- 
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FOR THE BKST .SEWING 

AI \< iriM.: ON EARTH*. 



If so, look for the 
highest Arm made, 
latest Bobbin Wind- 
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Needle. Double Lock 
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of adjustment. Self- 
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Self-setting Needle, 
Bull -))enrint;. with 
25 years' jjii Tan- 
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privilege of ordering 
it at our 



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which is lower thandealers 
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Grade, Ball-bearing. Neiv 
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complete in this style cabinet 



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THE EQUITY MFG. 
Chicago, 



& 6UFPLY CO. 
111. 



INDIA==A PROBLEM 



By W. B. STOVER 



Is one of the best selling books ever put out by the House. It 
contains a large number of illustrations, and describes the work that 
our Missionaries are doing, and the difficulties they have to contend 
with. 

Any one, after reading this book, will have a splendid idea of 

India and Her Customs. 

Also will want to do more to lift her people out of sin and degra- 
dation. 

Agents are reporting large sales of books, and if you want to 
make some money quick 

Write Us for Terms to Agents, 

Giving name of township and county wanted. Please note that we 
do not reserve territory in any other way. 

The book, in cloth binding, sells for ;Si.25; morocco, $2.00. 



Brethren Publishing House, 

Elgin, Illinois. 






The Brethren Church 



AT 



•* 



STERLING, COLORADO, 
I Was Dedicated Sunday, November 8th, 1903. 

THE MISSIONARY AND TRACT COMMITTEE 

Have Just Purchased 

Two of Our Irrigated Farms Near Sterling. 

^ 

; . m- WE HAVE SOLD -^ 

y 

[ Thousands of acres to the Brethren during the past 18 months, and are 
; now corresponding with hundreds of members in various States who have 
: become interested in THE GREAT SOUTH PLaTTE VALLEY, COLO. 

^ 

IF you want to know something about the country that everybody is 
talking about at present, where land produces big crops, and sure 
crops, where the people are healthy, prosperous and enterprising, and are 
ready and willing to give you a hearty welcome to locate with them, 

WRITE US FOR FREE ADVERTISING MATTER 
AND GENERAL INFORMATION. 

[**$*•'$'* ? '' * * * * t *^ *$m$>^mj»^»»*.»*^* » ^ «^ » l « » ^ » ^ « » ^ » ^ * » ^ t » ^ < » ^ < i $ « » * « i $ * ^*» * « « $ ■ » * ■* '■ ^ * " I " ► * « ► * ■■ * * « » * ■« > t * ^ * * x * ^ '^ ^ * * ♦ * * ^^ * * t * * ♦ * * ♦ * '' X * ^ * ? * * ? * ' t " * * * ' t * * ♦ * * * * ^ * * ♦ * * * " *$* * $ * * $ * ^ I * * ! * ' t * * t * * t '* * Sf * * **$* ''$*^** t '* ' I * ' t * " i * * ? •* ^ * { * H 

The Colorado Colony Company, 

STERLING, COLORADO. 



* 



t*^*****^* ^ ' *h * $ * *i* ^ I * *t* *$**$^^ ^*^4* 4* ^ " I * ^ * l * ' I * ^ ^ "^ * ! * * ! * * % * ^ ♦^>^«$»^*«$»^**4« *i-»-v *S**I-**I * $ * 4* ^ ' I * ^ * I * * l * " l '* ^ '' 4 * 4* 4 *^i*''£' ^ * ' I * * I * ' I * * I * " t * * I * * I * * I * * I * * I * * ^I * ' I * * ! * ^ t * * Z * " S * ' I * ' I * ' I * ' I * * * * ^*****2^ a 



THI 



INGLENOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING 



...TO.. 



STERLING, COLO., 



...CALIFORNIA... 

Lordsburg, the Laguna De Tache 
Grant, Tropico 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

Union Pacific Railroad 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, Utah 
and California Points. 



READ THIS. 



" I bought two years ago three acres unimproved and 
without water right, in Tropico, built a six-room cottage, 
and made other improvements, so that the whole cost me 
about $i,8oo. I sold at $1,200 per acre. Made in the op- 
eration $1,800. There are yet some chances here for those 
who will believe and go to work." M. M. Eshelman. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri River 
to all principal points West. Business men and others can 
save many hours via this line. Call on or address a postal 
card to your nearest ticket agent, or 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



Well Adapted for Beet Sngar Factory. 



This year has marked the establishment of the sugar 
beet industry upon a large and substantial basis. In 
igo2 the Chamber of Commerce fostered the new pur- 
suit by having twenty acres planted to sugar beets, 
such satisfactory results being secured from this experi- 
mental field that arrangements for the erection of a 
sugar factory were taken up and gratifying progress 
has been made. Under contract for delivery to estab- 
lished factories at a distance, the people of this county 
are growing 3,000 acres of sugar beets this year. 

Pay Roll $1,000 A Day. 

Citizens of Logan county are not boasting of what 
they can do or have done, but the pay roll to laborers 
engaged in cultivation of our beet crop has reached a 
total of $1,000 per day for many days. Growing of this 
crop has afforded employment for all persons who 
could work and desired to do so. The usual street 
game of marbles has lost its supporters, and the youth- 
ful population of from ten to fourteen years of age is 
earnestly assisting in the care and cultivation of the 
crop, earning $1.50 to $2.00 per day. Many of the Ster- 
ling boys have bank accounts ranging from $15 to $50. 
Aside from the financial benefit accruing from this la- 
bor it should be remembered that the boy who learns to 
till the soil is making a practical study of the founda- 
tion upon which all national government must rest, and 
what is more, especially the base for the commerce of 
the world. No nobler work can be performed than as- 
sisting Nature to supply the wants of the human family. 

Sterling is the seat of Logan county, located on the 
South Platte river and on the Union Pacific railroad. 
It is destined to remain the metropolis of northeastern 
Colorado. With 100,000 acres of the highest type of 
agricultural lands surrounding and under a perfect sys- 
tem of irrigation established in 1870, a third of a cen- 
tury ago. Sterling is possessed of the necessary condi- 
tions to become a city of 10,000 population. Enterprise 
and thrift of our citizens have required that in all things 
municipal the city shall be fully abreast of the times. 
There is now in course of construction one of the most 
perfect systems of waterworks in the commonwealth. 
Pure water from the wonderful Springdale springs is 
being pumped a distance of six miles to supply the 
needs of the city. 

In recognition of the substantial growth made in the 
county the railroad has erected a handsome passenger 
station at Sterling, costing $20,000. Many substantial 
business blocks have recently been built by local capi- 
talists who have unbounded faith in the future of the 
South Platte valley. School facilities are not inferior 
to those of any locality in the State. A new school 
building has just been completed for the intermediate 
grades at a cost of $20,000 and our high school ranks 
with those of other cities of the State. The moral and 
spiritual welfare of our people is splendidly provided 
for by eight church organizations, having six houses 
of worship. The Presbyterians, Methodist Episcopal, 
Baptist, Dunker Brethren, German Evangelical and 
Catholic are the denominations having church build- 
ings. — Ranche News, Denver, Colo. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Sterling, Colorado, 

n\IP PADF ''*"* $2.00, for the Round Trip First 
UilC rAttn and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



T 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail I 



■ 1"^ \ I 1 /^ 's the beat-watered arid State in America. Bretbren are moving there because hot winds, 

£ I M r\ I I. \J destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate it makes life 
bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer tu the prospective settler and if you have in miad a change 
for the general improvement in your coiidition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, 
we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that 
is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to answer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad tares to 
investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see for your- 
self. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 



Settlers' One=way Rates from March 1 to April 30, 1904. 

FROM To Pocatello, Huntington, 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa, etc. 

Chicago S30 00 $30 50 

St. Louis 26 00 27 50 

Peoria, 28 oo 28 50 

Kansas City and Omaha, : 20 00 22 50 

Sioux City, 22 go 25 40 

St. Paul and Minneapolis 22 90 25 40 




MODEL RANCH IDAHO. 



;^ Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine ^ 
2 Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat Oats and Barley. 



Nampa, Idaho. 
I came to Idaho two years ago Irom the best part of eastern Kansas. I had done no work for a year on ac- 
coant of poor health. One vear here brought me all right and this year I farmed and made more money from 
80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my potatoes were ahead, making 600 
bushels per acre. JoSHOA James. 



S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. n. QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



D. E. BURLEY, 

G. P.& T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

Salt Lake Cit> , Utah. 



Mention the INGLENOOK wlieii (irritmi. 






I 



/> 



^iKSbENOOK 



V^OL. VI. 



January 19, 1904. 



No. 3. 



ON CALVARY. 



■ Then were there two thieves crucified with him; one 
<in the right hand and another on the left." — Matt. 27:38. 

When it grew night on Calvary, 

When darkness trembled down. 
It seemed no light again could be 

On countryside or town. 
The somber clouds shut out the sky 

And flung themselves and swirled 
Above the crosses reaching high — 

That sorrow of the world. 

"\\"hen it grew dark on Calvary. 

Two women, heavy eyed, 
-\nd fearful lest a one might see. 

Crept up on either side. 
In halting dread they faltered on. 

Each battling with her fear.s — 
Their cheeks were sunken, pale and wan. 

-"Vnd stained with many tears. 

When all was still on Calvary, 

Two women, torn with sighs. 
Would turn from what they knew should be 

Held up before their eyes. 
They bowed their heads in all their woe 

And sobbing there, each one 
Turned, down the bitter way to go. 

And cried: "My son! My son!" 

When all was done on Calvary, 

The clouds beat back the stars; 
One cross was empty, of the three, 

And two had weighted bars. 
There, dumbly asking whence and why 

This web that sorrow weaves. 
Stood, questioning the leaden sky. 

The mothers of the thieves. 

^W. D. N. 
»j. •;. ^ 

JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



yiuzzling is not curing. 

* 

Success begins where failure ends. 



Self-control goes before leadership. 



An angry word has often lost a friend. 



If you want to get even, forget about it. 



Self-control is one of the greatest virtues 



There is nothing to make uj^ for lost duf\. 



Let your soul reflect the sunlight of heaven. 



When a boy looks saintly send for the doctor. 

* 
The world is full of opportunities to do good. 



Good humor is alzvays better than complaining. 

* 
Do not lose your head in trying to win. her hand. 

Alen of ability haz'c not alu'ays attractive manners. 

Sonic people ask advice to get their ozvn confirmed. 

* 
Have you got over 'blotting your ipoj this 1004 
year? 

Unless \ou can be humble you should not be hon- 
ored.. 

* 

We arc all the time writing our lease of the ne.vt 
world. 

* 

Doing the right thing is always divine, no matter 
zuhat it is. 

♦ 

Our entire knowledge is but as a drop into an ocean 
of darkness. 

There is nothing like the love of truth save that it 
be truth itself. 

Stand on your own feet and help yourself: it ivill 
make you strong. 

* 

What you write in the hearts of other people in 
the way of love and mercy unll cause you to be remem- 
bered and they are the only things that zv-ill. 



)l i36 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



SANTA BARBARA MISSION. 



BV KATHLEEN MAC VENN GAYLORD. 



" The hands that reared thy massive walls. 

And formed thy turrets, stone on stone. 

Lie mouldering where thy shadow falls." 

The historic old city of Santa Barbara, California, 
located at the foot of the highest peaks of the Santa 
Ynez range, and founded about 122 years ago, is the 
home of one of the oldest missions in California. 

Nestled against the foot-hills, the old building 
crowns the slope on which the city stands. It is the 
largest, and best preserved of the western missions, 
and the only one that has perpetuated the old forms 
of mission worship. 

Over a century ago, the Santa Barbara Presidio was 
a frontier garrison and the Spanish flag was proudly 
floating from her walls ; some of the adobe homes, al- 
most a century old, still cluster around the site of the 
Presidio and mission. 

The construction of the Coast Line, bringing Santa 
Barbara into connection with San Francisco and Los 
.A.ngeles, has called the attention of tourists to the 
place in great numbers during the past two years, and 
the old mission is the motive point of all strangers. 

The Franciscan guide takes one first into the relic 
rooms, filled with mementos of the early days. Here 
we find many of the crudest of articles for domestic 
use; the old mortars and pestles, that were used to 
pound the Indian corn into meal, old drinking vessels, 
primitive hide beds, old vellum-bound parchments, 
pieces of tapestry, and an altar cloth said to be the 
one made by Ramona. 

Passing down the long, stone-flagged corridor, we 
reach the tower entrance, and are led through a very 
dark passage to a darker stairway, with very high, 
narrow steps. The little hollows worn in them by 
the passage of countless hundreds of feet, combined 
with the darkness and narrowness of the passage, make 
the ascent difficult, but when one emerges at the top 
into the gleaming sunlight, what a wonderful picture 
is spread before the vision. 

Down below, at the back of the bell-tower, lie the 
sacred gardens of the priests. With the exception of 
Mrs. Benjamin Harrison and Princess Louise, who ob- 
tained permission, no woman's foot has ever trod these 
sacred paths. Just over the ivy-covered wall lies the 
old mission garden, which is open to the public, when 
accompanied by a guide. 

Standing in the tower, in close proximity to the 
mellow old bells, one looks out over cultivated fields 
and orchards, rose-embowered homes, alluring drives, 
and beyond this the yellow sands of the beach, the 
cliff's, the foam of the ceaseless breakers, and the blue 
waters of the bay. The many beautiful tints of sky, 



sea and mountains, are beyond the portrayal of poet's 
pen, or artist's brush. 

Leaving the tower, we grope our way down the dark, 
winding stairs to the corridor, and up the broad stone 
steps to the church entrance. To one with a vivid 
imagination these rough, hollow-worn steps are preg- 
nant with history and romance. 

.\s we look down the long, dim corridor, toward the 
distant altar, we see many kneeling worshipers. The 
soft glow of the candles faintly light the fine old paint- 
ings and embroideries, and the air is sweet with in- 
cense, and the slow chant of solemn voices. 

The guide unlocks the side door of the chapel, and 
we enter the garden of graves, with its odorous air 



I 




SHIPPING WALNUT LOGS. 

and vivid coloring. There are five thousand souls 
quietly sleeping here in this limited space. The graves 
are in tiers of five deep, and are all walled with stone ; 
and over this the soil is spread, which nourishes the 
lavish floral display. 

The Mission garden is enclosed by a very thick stone 
wall about twelve feet high, and that, together with the 
old church wall, that forms the fourth side of the en- 
closure, is covered with the gray old ivy, mingled with 
the passion vine, symbolizing the pain and sorrow 
of the Christ. 

Queen Summer holds perpetual court here ; the vel- 
vet-petaled roses, lilies, marguerites, and purple, sweet- 
scented violets, meet you at every turn. Northern 
pines and southern palms mingle here, with brilliant 
acacias, and graceful pepper trees. A peaceful silence 
reigns, broken only by the song of nesting birds, and 
the occasional faint tinkle of a bell far within the walls. 

This structure was reared entirely by the hands of 
the Monks and Indians in 1786, under the direction 
of Father Junipero Serra. The timbers were fastened 
together by means of wooden pegs and raw-hide 
thongs : the bulk of the structural work being stones 
and mortar. The walls, of hewn stone, are six feet 
thick. 



11 



ti-ie: !ngi_e;nook. 



51 



In 1769 a small band of brown-robed friars left 
Mexico and turning northward, penetrated the vast 
solitudes of the wonderful golden State. As we pass 
through the populous cities, and cultivated fields, one 
can hardly conceive the great lonely beauty of this 
virgin land, to the eyes of this intrepid little band 
of holy men. 

The Missions have played an important part in the 
histor}' of California. For many years the bells pealed 
forth their solemn call to the red men, and the work 
of evangelization went steadily on. They were the 
only abodes of civilization in the western solitudes, and 
the Indians were instructed in the simplest rudiments 
of domestic life. The rolling hills began to bear har- 
vests of grain and fruit, and thousands of mission 
cattle roamed over the hitherto solitary hills and val- 
leys. 

In 1833 the Mexican Congress passed a decree, 
secularizing missions, and confiscated thousands of 
acres of land, that were the onl}' means of support 
for the Indians. The missions were cut down to 
parishes, and soon declined, and the Indian, to whom 
we first owe the cultivation of this land of milk and 
honey, have vanished as a race. 

Through these many years, in Santa Barbara Mis- 
sion, the angelus still rings from the sweet old bells 
that crossed the seas : 

" Bells of the past, whose long-forgotten music 

Still fills the wide expanse. 
Tinging the sober twilight of the present 

With color of romance. 
I see the dying glow of Spanish glory. 

The smart commander in his leather jerkin. 
The priest in stole of snow. 

O solemn bells! whose consecrated masses 
Recall the faith of old. 

Your voices break and falter in the darkness. 
Break, falter and are still." 

Elgin, III. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

WHY ARMOR PLATE IS COSTLY. 



The general public has always been mystified at the 
extremely high price paid for armor plate. According 
to the Iron and Steel Number of the Scientific Ameri- 
can, the most important item is the great length 
of time required for the successful manufacture of 
a plate : for, on an average, every plate is being 
constantly worked upon, either in furnace, forge, 
machine shop, or annealing and tempering depart- 
ment, for a continuous period of nine months. Other 
causes of high cost are : the large number of separate 
operations, the frequency with which the great masses 
must be transported, and the distances over which they 
must be carried in their journey from one department 
to another. To illustrate the vast scale on which 
an armor plate and gun steel works is laid out and 
the distances to be covered from shop to shop, we 



may mention that the whole establishment of the Beth- 
lehem Steel Works extends in one direction continuous- 
ly for a length of a mile and a quarter, and that the 
forty or' fifty handlings and transshipments, which oc- 
cur in making a single Krupp plate, take place in and 
between such buildings as the open-hearth structure, 
which is III feet wide by 1,950 feet in length ; the ma- 
chine shop, 116^ feet in width by 1,375 ^^^t in length ; 
the armor forge, 850 feet in length ; and a face harden- 
ing department and an armor-plate machine shop, both 
of which are but little less in size. Further elements 
of expense are the large percentage of losses which is 
liable to occur, the high first cost of the extensive 
plants that must be laid down, and the fact that new 
and improved methods of manufacture may at any time 
render the plant more or less obsolete. The greater 
cost of the Krupp armor is largely compensated for by 
its much greater resisting qualities, which make it pos- 
sible to give equal defensive qualities for 20 to 25 per 
cent less weight or armor. 

♦ ♦ 4* 
A TOY BOOMERANG. 



Most boys know that the boomerang is a weapon 
used by the natives of Australia. It consists of 
an irregularly shaped piece of hardwood so fash- 
ioned that it can be thrown at an angle widely dif- 
ferent from the direction in which it is started. 

The savages are quite skillful in its use and one 
of their favorite ways of throwing it is to make 
it skim along the ground for about a hundred 
feet and then, rising in the air, double back on 
its course and hit a mark only a few feet in front 
of the thrower. 

Our boys need not hope to become skillful in 
the use of the weapon, even if they had one prop- 
erly made, but they can get lots of fun out of a 
toy one made of so simple a material as card- 
board. 

There are three forms in which one may be 
made. To throw it, place it on a book, one end 
extending beyond the edge of the book, and then 
with a small stick strike it hard on the outer edge 
and it will fly through the air in a very amusing 
and unlooked for manner. 

Or it may be thrown by snapping it with the 
forefinger of the right hand while you hold the 
book in your left. You had better make the ex- 
periment out of doors, for you cannot tell where 
the little thing will fly when you set it on its 
course. 

♦ ♦ *> 

Endeavor to be patient in bearing with the defects 
and infirmities of others, of what sort soever they be; 
for that thyself hast also many failings which must be 
borne with by others. — Thomas a'Keinpis. 



52 



the: inglenook. 



NEWSPAPER CELEBRITY. 



It costs no more to become a " well-known so- 
ciety woman," a " rising young lawyer," a " prom- 
inent author," or a " successful physician " than 
it does to have three dozen photographs taken. In- 
deed, the taking of the photographs and the mak- 
ing of the celebrity are parts of the one and same 
transaction. 

The scheme has many patrons both in Chicago 
and in other western cities. The payments which 
these customers have made are just beginning to 
bear fruit. 

Pick up any of those magazines which make a 
feature of a photographic department. In these 
pages you will find pictures of celebrities you have 
not met till now. You will wonder how they have 
escaped you. But there is their picture, with the 
line which certifies the original of the picture to 
be a " prominent," or a " rising," or a " well-known," 
or a " successful " this, that or the other. 

Take those periodicals that are devoted to spe- 
cialties, to the law, to sports, to medicine, to engi- 
neering. There again you will find the same pic- 
tures of the same persons. 

Then you will hear other people talk about them. 
You will talk about them yourself. Gradually the 
reputation will grow and flourish even as doth the 
celebrated green yew tree, or bay tree, or whatever 
tree it is that has such marvelous powers of rapid 
growth. 

In man}- cases you happen to know that the orig- 
inals of these pictures really have done some no- 
table thing. They have done something for which 
they should be honored. You do not wonder that 
their pictures appear in the public prints. But as 
for the others, those celebrities who, as it were, 
have sprung up like the mushroom between the 
setting of the sun and the rising of the same, of 
those celebrities you are skeptical. 

You need be uncertain no longer, for herein is 
revealed the secret spring from which many of our 
heroes and heroines come. The first step to be 
taken by one who would shine in the fierce white 
light of publicity is to have pictures taken. If the 
applicant for the sittings is a well-known actor or 
actress or a politician of great prominence these 
pictures will not cost a cent. 

Most photographers are glad of the advertise- 
ment they get from the connection of their name 
with that of their distinguished subject. But these 
people who can get photographs for nothing are 
not the people who need the advertising. 

He who would like to see his picture in public 
prints, together with a written notice in which his 
merits are alluded to, hies himself, either in Chi- 
cago or in New York, to the professional celebrity 



maker. In New York it is a young woman who- 
lives at one of the best hotels that gets most of the 
celebrity fashioning business. In Chicago three or 
four men are supposed to combine photography 
with the gentle art of making friends for their pa- 
trons. 

Three dozen photographs are at once taken. 
There was a time when the camera told the truth, 
but that was many, many years ago. Now the 
most common-place face in the world can, when it 
is looked upon by the magic lens, transform itself 
into a thing of beauty, which will be a joy as long 
as the photograph lasts. The pictures are taken. 

The subject gives his employe a few biographic- 
al details. He tells where he was born and when, 
what his business is, and what, if an}-, special 
achievements he has accomplished in it. Then he 
goes about his business and waits for fame to place 
her laurel upon his blushing brow. Usually fame 
does not wait long. 

Fame is aided and abetted by the adroit person 
under whose supervision the photographs have been 
taken. 

This person has in his desk a list of all the pe- 
riodicals in the United States. Such a list can be 
bought for fifty cents. The annotations upon it 
are -worth fifty dollars. 

But these annotations to be of value must be 
made b}- the person who is now supposed to be 
looking into the book. This is the person who took 
the pictures. He glances through the list and notes , 
those magazines that like pictures of pretty wom- f 
en, those that want pictures of men who have be- 
come successful in this or that line of work, those 
that care for portraits of young men who are -writ- 
ing their way to fame and big royalties. 

He selects from his list twenty-four. The others 
he sends later. Sitting down at his typewriter he 
writes into two or three hundred words, a digest of 
the biography the stibject has given him. 

fie has this notice mimeographed. With each 
notice he incloses a photograph and then he mails 
the lot. 

The scene shifts to the office of the editor of 
almost any magazine that an}' one cares to select. 
The editor and the chief of his art department are 
wondering how they will fill page 420 or what 
they will put in that lower half of page 36. 

■' Why, here," says the editor, " is just what we 
want. It came in the mail to-day. It is a good 
picture and it looks like a good man. Yes, he is 

a rising (the blank to be filled in by those 

who are in the secret). Put that picture on that , 
page." The thing is done. I 

There is no press agency about it. Actors and ac- 
tresses are barred from the service. It is all high 



the: ingleinook. 



53 



class and deftly done, and it serves its turn. What- 
ever publicity, whatever celebrit)- can do for the 
man who sat for the picture will be done. His 
name will be in many mouths and he may get 
great good from it. Perhaps the pictures will be 
thrown on the floor instead of being put in the 
magazine. Well, there are risks in every business. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
TEACHES HORSES TO SWIM. 



has, in fact, passed his " exam, 
cadet at Sandhurst. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

PRESIDENT FOR A DAY. 



as mucli as anv 



The British army at its Aldershot training camp 
maintains a swimming school for horses, where a 
good deal of attention is paid to this branch of 
their education before they are finally fitted for 
cavalry service. Horses are " enlisted " on reach- 
ing their third year, but it is generally two years 
more before they are taken for their first swimming 
lesson. The veterinary of^cer and riding master of 
the regiment supervise the work, and only expe- 
rienced men are, allowed to assist. 

The great thing is not to force or alarm the 
horse during his training, but rather to lead him 
b}' easy stages to enter the water quickly, fear- 
lessly and as noiselessly as possible. If terrified 
at the start, the horse would be likely to fight shy 
of deep water ever after. So on the first da}' the 
man who has charge of the horse walks his pupil 
about on the edge of the water, just permitting 
him to wet his hoofs and fetlocks. The next day 
the horse is introduced a little farther into the wa- 
ter, perhaps up to his body, and allowed to splash 
aroimd as he pleases. In this way the horse is 
gradually taken farther and farther in, until at 
length he loses his footing and starts swimming 
quite naturally, the man in charge swimming by 
his side to give him greater confidence. 

Then the horse is taught to swim in company 
with others, beside a boat, by way of training him 
to cross rivers with his regiment en masse. The 
horses are divested of all saddlery but head collars 
and head ropes. The men of each troop get into 
a boat, and by means of head ropes bring their 
horses into the water alongside. Then the boat 
is hauled across the river by a rope manned from 
the opposite side, and the horses necessarily follow. 

At times the horses are exercised in bearing their 
riders across on their backs. The horse wears on- 
ly the head collar and bridoon, and the rider strips 
himself and throws his legs up along the horse's 
flanks so as not to impede the animal's movements. 
As the horse naturalh^ swims very low in the wa- 
ter, the rider's weight pushes him down until on- 
ly his head is above the surface. But the animal 
soon gets over the uneasiness this causes him at 
first. Then the horse's tuition is complete and 
he is classed in his regiment as "proficient." He 



D.wiu R. Atchison, of Missouri, had the unique 
honor of being president of the United States for one 
day, and that was Sunday, March 4, 1849. The term 
of President James K. Polk expired on the morning of 
that day, but as it was Sunday, the president-elect, 
(jen. Zachary Taylor, was not inaugurated until next 
day. March 5. In consequence, the president pro tem 
of the United States senate, D. R. Atchison, was the 
acting president on March 4, 1849. However, he had 
presided at a night session of the senate, which lasted 




HOW AN OKL.AHOiSIA TOWN APPEARS. 

until away after midnight of Saturday, and he slept 

nearly all day Sunday without realizing the fact that 

he was president of the United States. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE TEMPLES AT ABYDOS. 



There have been unearthed at Abydos by Flinders 
Petrie ten successive temples ranging in age from 
500 to 5,000 years, which show the whole history of 
Egypt. A globular vase of green glaze with Menes' 
name inlaid in purple shows that polychrome glazing 
is 1,000 years older than has been surmised. Delicate 
carvings in ivory are found which rival in excellence 
the finest Greek or Italian productions. 
4> ♦ * 

The atmospheric pressure upon the surface of any 
ordinary man is 32,400 pounds, or over fourteen and 
one-half tons. The ordinary rise and fall of the ba- 
rometer increases or decreases this pressure by 2,500 
pounds. 

* ♦ * 

Eight million tons of copper was the world's pro- 
duction during the nineteenth century. 



54 



THE INGUEINOOK. 



^♦^{►^♦^»^J*^»*5**>+1»^-^*J»^J»4 



ti^*{>^^d 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



t 

i 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over the country. Each issue of the magazine vnll be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 






■ He prayeth well who loveth well 
Both man and bird and beast; 

He prayeth best who loveth best 
All things both great and small 

For the dear God that loveth us 
He made and loveth all." 

•{• i" ^ 

THE SCREECH OWL. 



One of the commonest birds of the owl family to be 
found anywhere is the little screech owl. It lives in 
the eastern part of North America as far south as 
Georgia, and possibly west to the plains. Occasion- 
ally, rarely however, it is found in England. Its name 
is Megascops asio. It is sometimes not easy to tell 
a hawk frorn an owl, but this question is always settled 
by remembering that the owl's eyes are set in front of 
the head and look straight forward, while the hawk's 
eyes are on either side and look to the right and left. 
This is true of the whole owl family. 

Our little screech owl is one of the handsomest owls 
to be found anywhere. It is not gregarious ; that is, 
it does not go in flocks, but is usually found singly. 
It makes its nest in hollow trees, where it lays from 
four to six white eggs, and they are like those of all 
the rest of the owl family, almost spherical. 

If a little owl is taken from the nest and raised by 
hand, it makes a most interesting pet and is better than 
a cat for clearing the house of inice if allowed the run 
of the place. In captivity the screech owl will live 
on grasshoppers and fresh beef. Such a thing as a 
mouse it will bolt whole, head foremost. 

A peculiarity of the owl, both in confinement and 
at large, is that it can get along without drinking any 
water. There are people who have had owls for years 
and have never known them to take a drink. 

The screech owl is found about farmhouses, or- 
chards, and gardens. It is also found in the vicinity 
of towns and cities. It is a sociable bird and is not giv- 
en to a hermit life by any means. Everybody knows 
their peculiar note uttered in a tremulous, doleful man- 
ner. Occasionally they are heard at this time of the 
year, but oftener late in the winter at the love-making 
season, when the male is trying to attract the female. 
No matter how doleful this owl song may apparently 
be, as far as the bird is concerned it is a song, just 
as much as the notes of a canarv. 



There are people who imagine that the note of an 
owl in the neighborhood presages some sort of disas- 
ter. This is all nonsense. It is simply the night bird 
singing to itself. A peculiarity of the screech owl is 
that its note is only heard a few hundred yards off 
and it appears to come from a great distance. The 
owl whose song is heard apparently from the woods 
a half mile distant may really come from a tree right 
in front of the house, or even from the roof or the 
garden gate. It sometimes perches in such a place 
and sings its song for hours. It should be remem- 
bered not to confuse the Megascops asio, or the little 
screech owl, with the big hoot owl which is another 
bird entirely. The food of the little owl is entirely 
animal or so nearly so that it may be said to be such. 
It lives on insects or mice and such small fry and is to 
be encouraged wherever found. 

When the screech owl flies around in the evening 
and even in the day time where it can be seen, it is 
seen to have a smooth noiseless flight. It will fly 
over the meadow, light on the ground plump, bend its 
body backward, look over its shoulder, make a pecul- 
iar bow, shaking its feathers out. and flies again to re- 
peat the performance. Clearly it is hunting for mice 
and nocturnal insects when it is doing this, although its 
performance on the ground is not only difficult to de- 
scribe but impossible to account for. 

Take it all around the Megascops asio is an owl to 
be encouraged instead of trying to kill it every chance 
one gets. Its note in the tree near the house has ab- 
solutely no bearing whatever on any human happen- 
ing, and if several screech owls are heard in the dis- 
tance toward spring, it is simply two gentlemen court- 
ing some coy female owl and they do it by seeing which 
can sing the better song. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
HOW TO COLLECT INSECTS. 



A COKRE.SPONDENT asks for the best way to kill in- 
sects, and how to preserve them. Two things are 
needed by the collector. One is a cyanide bottle, 
which the collector can make for himself. Or what is 
still easier, and perhaps more to the point, is a satur- 
ated solution of corrosive sublimate in alcohol. Let 
the collector take an ounce bottle and fill nearly to 
the top with alcohol. Then put in, a little at a time, 
enough corrosive sublimate so that, when the mixture 



HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



00 



is tested with a drop on a black feather it does not 
leave a white deposit of the poison. Otherwise it 
would whiten the specimens. The whole matter of 
the poisoning fluid should cost less than ten cents, 
and will last a long time. It is an essential, for with- 
out it smaller insects get into the collection and destroy 
it. 

Now how best use the fluid? When an insect is 
caught, either pin it down, or take it as it is, and then 
dip the end of a little stick, a match will do, into the 
fluid, taking up a drop, and touch the back of the 
specimen with it. The drop spreads all over the in- 
sect, and in an instant it is dead. It is the rankest 
kind of poison, and should be handled carefully. Now 
comes a very delicate operation. Taking a lot of pins, 
and triangular pieces of paper through which a pin 
is stuck, proceed to straighten out your specimen, get- 
ting it into natural position, and allow it to stiffen 
in that pose. Once it is rigid it will stay there and the 
supporting pins and braces may be removed. It 
should then be pinned into its permanent place. There 
is nothing better for the purpose than the case of 
drawers in which the merchant keeps his spools of 
thread, if you are lucky enough to secure one. A 
little later detailed instruction will be given in the 
Inglenook how to proceed in making collections of 
■diflFerent specimens, animals, insects and plants. 
♦ * ♦ 
YOUR BONES. 



The inside of your larger bones contains marrow. 
This is not mere fat, as many suppose, but contains 
elements that are used in the composition of the red 
corpuscles of the blood. These corpuscles are formed 
in other parts of the body and are a very important 
part of the blood. When a long bone grows it does 
so from the ends, where the cartilage is laid on thick. 

Around each of your bones is a thin sheath, and 
from this the bone grows in thickness. If you had 
a living bone and cut a thin cross-section of it, and 
put it under the microscope, you would see that it is 
literally riddled with small canals that contain blood 
vessels. Around each canal, where there is a blood ves- 
sel are grouped bone cells and each one of these minute 
pieces of bone sends off fibers to the adjoining pieces or 
cells. If we took the living matter out of bone it would 
look like a tangle of animated spider web. As we 
grow older mineral matter predominates and the gela- 
tine disappears gradually. A broken bone in the case 
of an old man is very difficult to reunite. Moreover, 
they are more easily broken than in early youth. We 
seem to know this naturally, for if you watch the boy 
race down the street and the old man creep along very 
gingerly, something seems to tell them to act the way 
ihey do. 

What kind of animals have marrow in their bones? 



How many Inglenookers have ever thought of 
their bones and how they grow? Every one who 
reads has within him an osseous framework which 
■other people call his skeleton. This skeleton, as is 
well-known, is composed of bones common to man 
and many other animals. If it is asked how bones get 
there a good many readers might be puzzled to tell. 

In the first place when you were born, your bones 
were not bones but cartilage. In other words, they 
were mapped out or sketched, so to speak, when you 
were a baby, and developed into bone later on in life. 
At first they were simply more or less solidified carti- 
lage and able to bend this way and that without much 
trouble. If one of them broke it was like a green 
stick breaking on one side and never break clean off. 

Now take any one bone, that of your upper arm, for 
illustration. In due season mineral matter began to be 
deposited in the cartilaginous bone, as we will call it. 
This mineral is phosphate of lime and the work is 
done in the living cells of the cartilage. Not all of 
the bone, however, is phosphate of lime, but is another 
■composition represented by gelatine, which is the ani- 
mal basis of the bone. If the gelatine is taken out it 
leaves the bone hard, dry and white. That is why 
when a beef bone or a chicken bone is boiled it has a 
-peculiar dead white aspect. The gelatine is boiled out. 



What classes of the animal creation do not have 
marrow in their bones ? 



How can you always tell by looking at a strange ani- 
mal whether or not it has marrow in its bones? 



row 



Has a robin marrow in its bones? Has a bat mar- 



BLUEPRINTING. 



One of the best ways of amusing one's self and at 
the same time adding to his knowledge in a very 
pleasant and profitable way, is that of blueprinting 
grasses, flowers and the like. Here is the way it is 
done. Take forty grains of red prussiate of potash, 
and sixty grains of citrate of iron and ammonia each 
in one-half ounce of water. When dissolved pour 
them together. That is the sensitizing solution. Now 
take any solid-surfaced paper and coat it evenly with a 
soft brush, hanging it up in a dim lig'ht to dry. 

When it is dry take a fern, for illustration, and dry 
it pretty thoroughly in a book, then take a piece of 
heavy panel cardboard or any kind of board will do, 
paper cover it, and lay on it your blueprint paper, 
large enough to allow the arrangement of the fern. 
Lay a heavy sheet of clean glass over the whole thing, 
after which put it in the sun for ten minutes. You 
then have on the deep blue ground a pure white image 
of the fern. The expense is next to nothing and the 
result is wonderfully attractive and interesting. 



56 



HI 



ingi_e:nook. 



COLLECTION OF EGGS. 



It is often the case that the naturalist desires to 
make a collection of birds' eggs. There is no reason 
why this should not be done if in the interest of science, 
but no more than one egg should be taken from any 
one nest and at most two. They must be numbered 
delicately but surely on the shells so that reference may 
be had to the record to show to what bird they belong. 

The first thing to be done with an egg is to bore 
a hole in one side of it with an egg drill which any 
intelligent boy may make out of a darning needle by 
simply grinding it to a chisel edge and then again 
grrnding it to a point. After having one hole in one 
side which need not be very large, there should be a 
blow-pipe, which is also easily made, placed at one 
side of the hole, and vigorous blowing will blow out 
the contents if fresh. If the egg is addled or if there 
is a partly-formed young bird in it, as much should 
be blowed out as can be and the egg filled with water 
and set aside. Decomposition of the contents will en- 
sue, after which they can be taken out. 

After being thoroughly cleansed they should be 
washed out with water and carbolic acid. A pint of 
water in a bottle containing half an ounce of carbolic 
acid of the better kind is enough for all the eggs that 
anv Nooker is likely to accumulate in a season, and the 
whole business should not cost more than ten cents. 

The nicest way to keep eggs, once they are prepared, 
is to group them according to their class, that is, all 
the duck eggs together, all the warbler eggs by them- 
selves and so on. The number should be copied into 
a note book and after it should be given the common 
and scientific name if possible. 

There is nothing like an old spool-case for a col- 
lection of eggs. This can sometimes be bought of a 
dry goods dealer or under certain circumstances, easily 
imagined, he might be wheedled into making a present 
of it to the school. Now, if the bottom of these draw- 
ers are filled with pure, white, clean sand, or what is 
just as good, or perhaps better, a layer of cork such as 
the Spanish grapes come packed in. it will be an ideal 
place to keep the eggs. In one corner of the drawer, 
or each corner, for that matter, there should be placed 
a moth ball, not that the moths are apt to destroy the 
shells for the>- are not, but on general principles it is a 
disinfectant of everything of the character of the egg 
that has been doctored. 

A common way of preserving a bird, and which is 
verv effective, but which requires considerable skill, 
lies in opening its mouth, when it is dead, of course, 
and pouring it full of strong, undiluted carbolic acid. 
This acid will penetrate every part of the bird and act 
as a preservative. Tmmediatelv after the bird has 
been filled it should be propped up in place by pins 
and needle or an^•thing else available and allowed to 
drv in that position. This, of course, does not involve 



the eyes of the bird, which are a separate matter and 
which may be treated later in the Inglenook. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
NEW FACTS ABOUT BIRDS. 



Thil island of Laysan is about eight hundred miles 
west of Honolulu and its highest point above the sea 
does not exceed thirty feet. It is about three miles 
long and one and one-half miles wide, and, although 
it belongs to the United States, it has escaped atten- 
tion until now. A writer in the Scientific American, 
who has been there, states that every available inch 
of space on the island is claimed by birds for nesting 
purposes. These birds have never been disturbed by 
man, and the explorers found difficulty in keeping 
from tramping on them, and they were as tame as 
domestic fowls could be. Some of them could be 
stroked by the hand and thev acted as though they 
had been reared as pets. 

Space is in such demand on this island for nesting 
that the birds have built their nests one above the 
other after the manner of an apartment house. In 
order to photograph a nest the old bird was picked up 
by hand and carried some distance, and before the cam- 
era could he fixed she had walked back and got on the 
nest again. 

The petrels have burrowed in the ground for nest- 
ing purposes so that sometimes the explorers would 
break through and sink deep into the nest. It was 
necessary to exercise great care in walking around 
in order not to crush the young birds and eggs. .\11 
sorts of birds were found in the colony. 

The point, we want to bring out for the benefit of 
the nature study clubs, and our readers generally, is 
that these birds did not fly away at the approach of 
man, having never known what a cruel animal he is. 
They were marvelously gentle, perhaps more so than 
the ordinary barnyard fowls. There is no reason why 
this should not hold true of our own forests and 
woods, could we educate the people to a better realiza- 
tion of the rights of the animal kingdom and so re- 
late ourselves to them that they do not regard us as 
enemies to fly from for their lives every time they see 

us. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE PRETTIEST BABIES. 



An old mother partridge was at work at home while 
her children were off at school. She had intended 
giving them their lunch to take along but had for- 
gotten it. So, seeing a turtle coming by with a pack- 
age on his back, intended for the turtle's children, 
Airs. Partridge stopped her and asked her whether 
she would not take some nice wiggle worms for the 
little partridges. The turtle said she would, but want- 
ed to know how she could know the partridge children 



HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



57 



from all the others as tliev looked pretf>- much alike 
to lier. Well, the mother partridge said that the thing 
to do was to pick out the three handsomest children in 
the whole school and give the wiggle worms to them. 
They were her children. 

So the turtle took the bunch of wiggle worms and 
started off at a gallop, which is pretty slow work 
after all. She got to the school kept by the parrot 
at noon when the children were all outside playing. 
Being a conscientious turtle, she thought she would 
first look up tlie partridge children and give them the 
worms. After sizing up the whole school she came to 
a conclusion about which there was no doubt in her 
mind. The prettiest children there were the three of 
her own. So she spread out the worms and they 
had a feast. Tlie turtle thought it strange that Mrs. 
Partridge had got things so badly mixed as to not 
know her own children any better than to describe 
them as she did. There may not be much natural his- . 
torv in this story, but there is a good deal of human 

nature. 

♦ ♦ •> 

MAKING A QUEEN BEE. 



If for any cause it is desired on the part of a hive 
of bees to make a queen, they proceed to do it after 
this manner : A worker-larva, egg or larva, is selected 
by the bees, and the cells adjacent to the one contain- 
ing the larva selected are removed. This larva that 
is to make the queen, is surrounded by a royal cell. 
The development of the queen is about the same as 
that of the worker, only that it is more rapid and is 
brought about by the queen larvje being fed on richer 
and more plenteous food called royal jelly. 

This royal jelly is different from both the food of 
the worker and the drone larvae, and it is said to be di- 
gested pollen. One authority fed his bees honey with 
finely pulverized charcoal in it, and then found the 
same charcoal in the royal jelly. There is never any 
imdigested food fed to the queen or worker larvae. It 
is thick, like cream, slightly yellow, and so abundant 
that the queen larva not only floats in it during its 
period of growth but quite a large amount remains 
after she has vacated the cell. 

It is one of the remarkable things in insect life that 
the sex can be changed by a variation of food, and 
it is still more remarkable that the bees themselves 
know this and proceed accordingly. This has led 
scientific men to try the same experiment on other liv- 
ing things but without apparent success. 
♦J. ^ .j» 
SKELETONS. 



One of the great differences between insects and ani- 
mals lies in the fact of their skeletons being unlike. 
The reader's skeleton is within his bodv. and his 



muscles and other integuments are packed around it. 
In the case of an insect its skeleton is on the outside 
and it varies in degree of hardness owing to the pres- 
ence, more or less, of a substance called chitine. If 
there is much of this present, the outside shell is hard, 
and if there is not so much it is softer, but the in- 
terior of the shell or skeleton contains all the parts of 
ihc insect. Some of these shells or skeletons are very 
hard, and there are perhaps few Xookers who have 
not seen some of the larger beetles, known as " pinch- 
ing bugs,'' fly against a house or stone wall 
and then pull themselves together, and go on unhurt. 
Some skeletons of the insect family are so hard as to 
defy the bites of animals, and this is their means of 
offence and defence. 

♦ ' ♦ ♦ 

The blood of all insects is of white color and is en- 
tirely destitute of the red corpuscles, which are so 
numerous in the higher animals, which gives their 
blood its red color. The reason for the absence lies in 
this fact: The function of these red corpuscles is to 
carry oxygen, and so oxygen is carried everywhere 
through the body, but in the insects there are tubes 
which penetrate to all parts of the body and allow oxy- 
gen to touch the organs and the blood directly, and 
thus there is no occasion for the red discs or red blood 
in insects. There are only a few corpuscles and these 
are white. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The eggs of insects are not unlike those of the 
higher animals. They have their outside shell, and 
a yolk surrounded by the white albumen. Some of the 
eggs are very beautiful and are of many different 
shapes. All insects seem to be endowed with a won- 
derful instinct as to where to lay their eggs so as to 
furnish food for the larvae. 

♦> ^ ♦ 
Insects do not have organs of circulation such as 
mammals have. There is a heart, which is a long 
tube situated along the back, and through this the 
blood passes by a system of valves and muscular con- 
traction. With a good microscope the common cab- 
bage butterfly may be made to show the heart action 
admirably. 

The reason why some insects are not picked up by 
birds is due to the fact that they secrete a disgusting 
fluid or gas which seems to afford protection. There 
are some butterflies that will fly about in the open in 
the very midst of insectivorous birds which never thmk 
of touching them. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

.Sir John Lubbock has proven conclusively that 
ants and wasps distinguish colors. This is doubtless 
true of all insects that live on sweets and are at- 
tracted bv flowers. 



58 



THE ingi_e:nook. 



A Weekly Mag-azine 



..PUBLISHED BY., 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN. ILL, 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magaiintf, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 

Brethren Publishing House, 

(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South Sute St. EI-GIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 

You are here, and you are wanted, 

Though a waif upon life's stair; 
Though the sunlit hours are haunted 

With the shadowy shapes of care. 
Still the Great One, the All-Seeing, 
Called your spirit into being — 

Gave you strength for any fate. 
Since your life by him was needed. 
.^11 your ways by him are heeded — 

You can trust and you can wait. 

♦ * ♦ 
THE PRICE OF SUCCESS. 



Whoever succeeds in any line of human endeavor 
must pay the price. Reference is not had to the ele- 
ments that lead up to success, but the deterrents are to 
be considered. As long as a person attains to nothing 
more than the mediocre, those about him let him alone. 
He begins to feel the hand of the opposition behind 
him the moment he passes the one in front. 



It is something so utterly out of the question of 
prevention that it must be regarded as part of the price 
of being first. No matter what line of human endeav- 
or it may be, from digging a ditch in the meadow to 
engraving a name on a gold watch, the outcome of 
the first and best digger or engraver carries with it 
the pulling down and vituperation of those who can 
only follow. The higher up the prize the louder the 
denunciation. It is a sad commentary on the average 
of human nature, but it is as true as anything can be. 
Come out for some petty office that anybody else wants 
and learn the lesson of the littleness of human nature. 
The higher the place the viler the opposition. 



Once when . General Grant was President of the 
United States he was very much depressed over the 
calumny of the press. Tliere was nothing too vile, 
nothing too mean to say. Complaining about the in- 
justice of the matter to a friendly Senator, the latter 
said nothing, but the next day came to the President 
and read from a newspaper an attack that out-Herod- 
ed Herod for malignancy. The Senator then asked 
Grant what he thought of it. The President was si- 
lent in shame and rage. Then the Senator passed over 
the paper without a word, and Grant saw that with 
only a substitution of his own name, it was an attack 
on the character of George Washington when he was 
President. 



1 



It is precisely so in any line of work. Whoever is 
at the top is a mark for the detractor and defamer. 
The higher up the worse it is. And what is worse is 
that no class of people is exempt. The man who leads 
has to pay for his place. Some are pachyderms and do 
not mind it. Others, finer grained, have been killed by 
it. Keats died of a criticism, and many a man and 
woman have turned their faces to the wall and en- 
tered the unknown with a torrent of vilification fol- 
lowing them. 

But there is a better side to it all. There are some 
people not eaten up with envy, some who are too finely 
organized to stoop to the mud that they may throw it 
at one higher and better than they. There are even 
those who glory in the success of their friends and not 
a few are even helpful and honest about it. When 
you meet such persons take off your hat. They merit 
it. Your head may not be large enough to win out, 
but your soul is not narrow gauge, and when we meet 
them let us give them the honor that is due to all 
stich. 



What is the reason for the existence of the mud 
thrower? Really there is no good reason and the 
cause of it lies in the animalism of the individual. He 
thinks he is entitled to the first and best. Naturally 
small, he hates the great. Of the earth earthy, and be- 
cause of his misfortune, not his fault, he cannot see 
any success without detracting from the fame and 
honor of the winner. He cannot help it, not if he tried 
all that was in him. He has his place, as all have, but 
lie does not know it and shows his ignorance of his 
real value by attempting to belittle those better than he 
is. 



After all is one person as good as another? No, he 
is not, viewed from all earthly angles of vision. Be- 
fore God, yes. But not among men are they all alike. 
Is Arnold, the traitor, as good as Washington, Judas 
as good as Paul, the high priests as good as Christ, 
a harlot as good as a saint ? God created us and gave 
us what we have. To some he gave one talent, to 



F 



HI 



INGLEZNOOK. 



59 



others more. When we see the winner and happen to 
know him, it is due from us to him that we count 
them and their place as worthy of all honor and he 
who gives his tribute to their fitness proclaims himself 
above the littleness that only seeks to defame. 
* * + 
ANOTHER SIDE. 



Everybody who reads knows about the Iroquois 
theater in Chicago and its disastrous fire. In order to 
make sure that no repetition of this terror shall occur 
the authorities closed all the public places that had 
not literally complied with the law regarding safety 
appHances. Naturally this threw many out of em- 
ployment. 

Now about how many people have found their oc- 
cupation gone by this action of the law? How many 
do you think, Nooker, get their bread and butter in 
the way of public performance or assistance thereat? 
Would five hundred be too many? Well, the papers 
that have investigated the matter say that at present 
there are ten thousand people, of the class named, out 
of employment. Never in the history of the United 
States has a business of such magnitude been wiped 
out in one afternoon. More than thirty playhouses 
in Chicago are locked and barred as a result of the 
fire. With the stopping of the play the pay stops in 
the vast majority of instances, and none of the indirect 
victims know when they will get back into the work 
they best understand. 

It affects girls the hardest, and there are over nine 
hundred of them at this writing in Chicago who are 
out of a job. It is all well enough to preach a pos- 
sibly merited sermon about the matter, but the time 
is not now when the victims are just in their graves 
and the living do not know which way to turn for 
an honest living. 

•I' '!< >> 
STARTING RIGHT. 



Mr. Loree, the newly-elected president of the Rock- 
Island, system, and the best paid railroad president 
of the United States, being asked for the secret of his 
success said that in the start of his business life he 
happened to get in with some good men, and kept 
right with them, onward and upward. This is all 
doubtlessly true, and explains much, but not all. It 
would be more to the point if it were understood how 
he happened to get in at the very start with the kind 
of men who could be of service to him. 

Starting right is all important, even though one 
cannot tell what is ahead of him. ■ What goes before 
starting right is the preparation for the chance when 
it opens up. There is no end of people who are per- 
fectly willing to begin in a well-paid place, and when 
confronted with the fact that they have no fitness for 
the place say that they " can learn." Just there the 



break comes. It is not learners that these places want, 
it is the man who knows. So the very start of getting 
on is the " know how " to begin with. Once one has 
that the rest is simply watching for the opening. 

* ♦ * 
THE HURRYING HABIT. 



While it is always well to keep moving, and not 
to waste time, like every other good thing in this 
world, it is susceptible of being overdone. If any- 
thing, the party who is in the hurry habit is worse 
off than he who is in the habit of putting off things. 

It is strange how this peculiar condition of the mind 
is manifest in public places. A man will drive over a 
railroad crossing just in front of a passing train, whip- 
ping up his horses to get over, and then, when over, 
will stop and watch the train pass, for no obvious 
reason. When a train full of passengers reaches the 
city, the people will fill the aisles ready to disembark 
on a run when there is no necessity for it. It is simply 
the desire to get there ahead of other people. 

Those who are the unfortunate possessors of the 
hurry habit have not learned the important lesson of 
starting in time. Getting ready and having fore- 
thought is of more value than running. Anyone can 
start his business in good time and get in good shape 
by beginning properl)'. The man who goes on a run 
is not always the man who gets there first. 
^ ^ ^* 
PNEUMONIA. 



The city papers are full of discussion of the causes 
of pneumonia, which disease has been wonderfully on 
the increase for the past few years. There is a com- 
mon concensus of opinion that much of it is caused 
by steam overheating in rooms. 

In a large office building where the matter of heat 
is looked after by a person set apart for the purpose, 
or in a house where there are individuals to look after 
that, the temperature is always relatively high. Peo- 
ple who leave such places, and go at once out in the 
open air are almost certain to contract colds if they 
are liable to that form of disease. 

A neglected cold is the direct road to pneumonia 
and as a result of these artificial conditions in the 
cities the increase of the dread disease has been several 
hundred per cent over the normal. The recommen- 
dations are to bundle up on going out into the air 
from a very close room. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Look out for the articles on letter-writing. They 
will begin in a short time and continue for some weeks. 
Read them carefully, and remember what they teach, 
and apply practically in every letter you write here- 
after. The difficulty is not in understanding what is 
written, but will be in its practical application. It is 
proverbially hard to learn new tricks. 



6o 



THE. INCSLEINOOK. 



WHAT'S THE NEWS? 



Japan is said to be not quite ready for war. 

Now they propose making a saint of Joan d' Arc. 

The pope has received a million from a Corsican 
widov/. 

Bryan writes entertainingly on the navy of this 
country. 

Senator Smoot, of Utah, says he is not and never 
has been a polygamist. 

The Catholics claim a population of a million in 
the archdiocese of Chicago. 

There is said to be over one thousand cases of ty- 
])hoid at Montreal. Canada. 

Jean Leon Jerome, a great painter, died in Paris. 
He was found dead in his bed. 



A street car was hit by a .Milwaukee car at a cross- 
ing in Chicago. Nine injured. 



A court has decided that the odor of onions is il- 
legal if it annoys a neighborhood. 



Senator Hanna, of Ohio, has been re-elected to the 
United States Senate by the legislature. 



A Missouri lad, only thirteen years old, is teach- 
ing school in the Ozark region, Missouri. 

Senator Ankeny tripped over his pet dog at Walla 
Walla, Wash., fell and hurt himself badly. 



The pope has forbidden low cut gowns at receptions 
and other meetings where the clergy attend. 

Dowie is said to be about to establish a new city of 
Zion in Texas. He declines to give details. 



Panning out the debris of the Iroquois theater has 
resulted in finding many valuable diamonds. 



The servant girls of Orange, N. J., have organized 
a union to offset the Woman's Club of that city. 



One dead child and two fatally injured followed the 
pouring of oil on the kitchen stove at Newcastle. Pa. 

And now it is said that there is no foundation for 
the story that the pope ruled against low-cut dresses. 



At Sidney, South Wales, thirty-five officers and sail- 
ors were killed in a terrific explosion of the British 
cruiser Wallaroo. Jan. 6. The bodies of twelve men 
were thrown high into the air by the force of the 
explosion. 



The governor of New Jersey is complaining that 
the face of nature in his State is marred by advertising 
signs. 

Dr. Oskar Radvaner, a German student, is making a 
trip around the world on foot. He has covered 62,000 
miles. 



Since the Chicago theater fire the authorities of that 
city are compelling public places to comply rigidly with 
the law. 



The Czarina is seriously ill and an operation must be 
performed to save her life. The trouble is an abscess 



in the right ear. 



A volcano on Sugar Loaf mountain in Kentucky is 
assuming alarming proportions and the neighborhood 
is terror stricken. 



Agnes Hopkins, aged forty-five, in Chicago, has 
been driven insane by reading accounts of the Iro- 
quois theater fire. 

At a church at New Richmond, Wis., last Sunday, 
the cry of fire precipitated a pmic and nrinv \v re 
hurt, but none fatally. 

Nearly 7000 workmen have had their wages cut 
from ten to fifteen per cent by the various firms in 
Chicago they work for. 

The Supreme Court of Minnesota rules that a rail- 
road is not responsible for a blizzard and consequent 
loss of stock committed to its care. 



The workmen at William K. Vanderbilt's place on 
Long Island have gathered up thousands of quail that 
were slowly freezing and cared for them. 

St. Louis gets the Democratic national convention. 
Chicago and New York were both applicants for the 
place, but it went to the Missouri metropolis. 



At Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, fifteen hundred en- 
listed men are living on hash made of beef, potatoes 
and onions to determine its value as an article of food. ■! 

This time it is reversed. At Fisk University, a well- 
known negro institution " one of the girls " has been 
found to be a man. He says he thought himself a 
girl. 



Princess Maria, sister of Prince Henry, of Berlin, 
Germany, is engaged to an Austrian nobleman, Baron 
Gaugnoni. The Princess is a Protestant and her be- 
trothed is a Catholic. They have dififered as to wheth- 
er a priest or a preacher should perform the ceremony, 
and the wedding has been postponed. Of course it 
will come out all right in the end, and thev will live 
happih' ever afterward. 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



6i 



Russell Sage, the financier, has decided to give up 
business and take a rest. Uncle RusselL has been 
thrifty and forehanded and can afford to quit at eighty- 
seven and take it easy. 

President Roosevelt has ordered that half an hour 
be added to the time day of all department workers, 
and the various departments will close at 4 ; 30 P. M. 
hereafter, and not at 4. 



^liss Isabel McKenna, daughter of a Supreme Court 
justice, of Washington, D. C, was married Jan. 6, 
to Pitz Duffield, of New York. The wedding was a 
quiet one. 

The United States has landed marines at Seoul, 
Korea, to the number of one hundred and fifty. The 
idea is to protect United States property and the li'v'es 
at the Leafation. 



The steamer CoUain sank off the Pacific coast in a A citizen of Glen Ridge, N. J-. fixing his own roof, 

gale, and fifty-two people went down with her. It hap- was ordered off and down by a walking delegate of the 

pened in the Straits of Jaun de Fuca. The boat was a Roofer's Union. Distinctly humorous.— and some 

regular packet, carrying passengers. other things. 



The sister of the Kaiser is afflicted by what the pa- 
pers call a " malignant disease," and it is said that an 
operation is necessary. It is well known to the pub- 
lic that cancer is hereditary in the familv. 



Ruth, the young daughter of Mrs. and Mr. Grover 
Cleveland, the ex-president, is dead. She was sick but 
four days of diphtheria, which induced heart failure, 
resultirig in death. The sympathy of the whole coun- 
try is theirs, 

There is trouble in Chicago over the management 
of the estates of the dead who were killed in the Iro- 
quois theater fire. A great deal depends upon the 
legal technicality which one of a family dies first. 
^^'hole families perished in the flames. 



The two-year-old child of J. H. Munroe, one mile 
east of Harrisburg, 111., was burned at her home. The 
mother went to a neighbor, leaving the children, two 
and five years old, alone at home. The oldest child 
ran from the burning building and was saved. 



A bulletin is being sent out by the State Board of 
Public Instruction, warning boys of the danger of 
the city, and the desirability of staying at home on 
the farm. The teachers in all the public schools are 
urged to use all their influence to keep the boys at 
home. 



The Star Watch Case factory at Elgin burned to 
the ground on Jan. 8. This does not mean that the 
Elgin Watch Works burned, but that one of the two 
watch case factories burned. Making the watch 
works and making the case are two different indus- 
tries. The Star Watch Case factory that burned was 
just across the river from the Publishing House. 



The Boston schoolmarms are in trouble. A mem- 
ber of the school committee was stuck to a chair, on a 
recent visit, by a piece of chewing gum. This led 
to an order that no teacher should use gum at all, 
and as there are many users, the proscription sits hard 
on them. 



The Chicago authorities are entering into a search- 
ing investigation of the causes and responsibility of 
the Iroquois theater fire. The whole city is thorough- 
1\' wakened up. 

Mrs. Stiiffel, of Chicago, answered the door bell 
while she left her child. Lillian, in the kitchen. The 
little one was playing with matches and set herself on 
fire, burninsf to death. 



The Rock Island railroad has had a bad accident 
near Topeka, Kans. A passenger train and a freight 
train ran into each other, killing thirty and injuring 
more. Another case of somebody blundering. 



Gunder Gunderson, who embarked on the uncertain 
sea of matrimony when he was seventy years old is 
asking for an annulment of his marriage. He sets 
forth that he was not of sound mind when the cere- 
mony was performed. 

Three big wagon loads of dirt and ashes were taken 
from the Iroquois theater floor, and will be worked 
over for the valuables they may contain. Last Sunday 
morning one of the custodians found a diamond pin 
worth five hundred dollars on the floor. A great deal 
of jewelry is believed to be buried in the rubbish. 



D. Freedman, a manufacturing jeweler in Chicago, 
was held up in his place of business in the sixteenth 
floor of the Masonic Temple in broad daylight and 
robbed of nearly four thousand dollars in cash and 
jewelry. They jammed him into a wash closet and 
cleaned him out thoroughly. The robbers knew his 
office better than Freedman himself did. 



Mrs. Miriam Besley, superintendent of the public 
schools of Waukegan, 111., has issued an order that no 
pupil is allowed to expectorate on the school grounds, 
on the steps, sidewalks, floors or any other part of the 
premises. The penalty is suspension. This action is 
to be enforced to the letter for sanitary reasons. She 
also favors burning soiled handkerchiefs instead of 
washing them. 



the: ingi_e:nook. 



A PECULIAR OCCUPATION. 



The business of " professional escort " is rather a 
strange one, but it has become an established occu- 
pation in New York, and one which is proving prof- 
itable to scores of moneyless young men of pol- 
ished manners, pleasing appearance and useful in- 
formation. The notion is of English importation, 
and in London, where it is not considered good 
form for ladies to visit theaters and entertainments, 
or even to go shopping, unaccompanied by a gen- 
tleman, the professional escort has long been an 
established institution. In New York there are 
now two thoroughly reputable and recognized 
agencies for the supplying of male attendants upon 
ladies visiting the city for business or pleasure and 
who have not the advantage of friends or acquaint- 
ances of the sterner sex. 

An applicant for employment by these ladies' 
escort agencies is required to furnish first-class ref- 
erences as to character, and to qualify not only 
from an intellectual point of view, but to prove that 
"he has an intimate knowledge of the city and its 
institutions. He is also expected to look like a 
gentleman at all times, and to assume the conven- 
tional evening dress whenever required. He must 
report for duty each morning at lo o'clock and hold 
his services at the command of the office from that 
time until midnight, although he may not be ac- 
tively employed more than a few hours each day, 
and some days not at all. For this he receives a 
retaining fee of from $8 to $12 a week, with ex- 
tra remuneration of 30 cents an hour while on ac- 
tive duty. . 

He is expected to pay all minor expenses, such 
as car fares, out of his own pockets, not only for 
himself, but for the lady to whom he acts as es- 
cort, and he is absolutely forbidden to take tips. 
Of course all such charges as theater tickets, cab 
hire, meals, etc., are borne by his feminine patrons. 

The fees charged unprotected women for the ad- 
vantage of a presentable and agreeable escort are 
extremely elastic, and are apparently adjusted to 
fit individual cases. It is gathered, however, that 
a woman must pay about $1 an hour for the privi- 
lege of a male companion while shopping. 

" We have about forty men on our lists," said 
the manager of one of the " escort agencies," " and 
they vary in age from 25 to 50. They are all gen- 
tlemen in every sense of the word, some of the 
younger being college graduates. A few are actors 
of the better class and two have been in military 
service." 

When asked what class of women chiefly com- 
posed the patrons of the office the manager seemed 
less communicative than on the subject of the male 
employes. She admitted, however, that few who 



had not attained an age which precluded them be- 
ing classed as girls applied for professional escorts. 

" Our clients are chiefly strangers in the city," 
she said, " many being residents of the rural dis- 
tricts, who are naturally timid when alone in the 
mystifying whirl of the metropolis. It is not to 
be supposed that New York matinee girls, or even 
matrons accustomed to the active and independent 
life of the city, would need a stranger as an escort, 
but at all times, and especially during the summer 
months, there are hundreds of women visiting here, 
on business missions or bent on pleasure, who, 
knowing nobody, are glad of such polite and gen- 
tlemanly protection as we are able to provide. The 
supply of escorts is usually unequal to the de- 
mand." 

When it was hinted that there might be some 
danger of Cupid depleting the ranks of both patrons 
and professional escorts, the manager indignantly 
declined to give any further information and 
brought the interview to a sudden close. 
•{• * ♦ 
QUEER FACTS ABOUT RAIN. 



" Do you know," said the observant citizen, " the 
habit of running through the rain is based on a 
definite fallacy? It is a common habit. But does 
it tend to minimize the amount of water falling ■ 
on a person exposed to the rain? I am convinced 
that it rather aggravates the situation. By expe- 
rience, in passing the distance of a block, running 
one time and walking the other, and at times when 
the rainfall was about the same, I found that my 
clothes picked up more water and were cons.e- 
quently damper when I covered the distance in 
a run than they were when I walked it. 

" There seems to be a good reason for the rath- 
er curious fact. Rain falls irregularly. Sometimes 
there is a space of five or six inches between the 
falling drops, as we have noticed on smooth sur- 
faces, like a stone flagging, and again only the 
fraction of an inch will separate the drops. Wa- 
ter occasionally falls in sheets, but this is not usu- 
al. But while the fall is irregular, considered 
with respect to the perpendicular lines described 
in the descent, looking straight ahead and through 
the lines we will find before us a sheet of water 
that is well-nigh solid. We can imderstand that 
running against this sheet of water will have very 
much the same effect wind would have if its di- 
rection forced the rain into our faces. We sim- 
ply pick up the water and the fact that the spaces 
between the drops perpendicularly considered are 
greater than the spaces in any given direction hor- 
izontally will explain to us the fallacy of the whole 
thing." 



H 



INGLEINOOK. 



63 



TEST OF THERMOMETERS. 



'■ We have been selling as many thermometers this 
summer as usual," said a manufacturer in the New 
York Tillies, " in spite of the vagaries of the weath- 
er. It is a fact, though, that a good hot spell al- 
ways booms the trade. A man who buys a good 
thermometer will always swear by it as stanchly 
as he swears by his watch. It doesn't make any 
difference to him what official weather records say. 

'■ There is as much difiEerence in thermometers 
as there is in individuals- — or razors," he added, 
as an afterthought. " No two are exactly alike. 
Some thermometers are the work of scientific op- 
eration in the hands of experts ; others are turned 
out like so' many pairs of machine-made shoes. 
With extremely sensitive and minutely accurate 
instruments needed for reliable work the greatest 
care is taken. They are kept in stock for years, 
sometimes, and compared with the instruments known 
to be trustworthy beyond question. Naturally so 
much time cannot be spent over the cheap ther- 
mometer, although more care is devoted to them 
than many purchasers suppose. 

" Mercury is used for scientific instruments, but 
alcohol is used for the cheaper grades. The al- 
cohol is tinted with aniline dyes, which do not 
fade. The manufacturer buys the tubes in strips 
from glass factories. His blower cuts them to 
the proper lengths and makes the bulbs on the 
ends. When the bulbs are filled with alcohol they 
are allowed to stand for several hours before be- 
ing sent back to the blower to close the upper 
end. By this time the liquor is thoroughly ex- 
panded. 

" The first guide mark, 32 degrees Fahrenheit, 
is found by plunging the bulb into melting snow 
when it is to be had. This invariably gives the 
exact freezing point and is an unfailing test when 
the accuracy of a thermometer is suspected. When 
melting snow is scarce, as it often is, manufactu- 
rers use a little machine for shaving ice, which 
serves the purpose almost as well. 

" After their cold bath the thermometers go to 
another workman, who plunges them into a tub 
of water kept constantlj' at 64 degrees. Anoth- 
er takes them at 96 degrees, and so on, allowing 
32 degrees for each guidemark. Then they are 
ready to be put into frames and have the other 
degrees and their fractions marked off according- 
ly." 

♦ ♦ 4> 
HOW SARDINES ARE CURED. 



Their name comes from the fact that they are 
most numerous off the coast of Sardinia. They 
swim in shoals containing millions — fish-shaped 
shoals ten miles long and a half mile wide. The 
sardines are netted and taken at once to the shore. 
There they are washed, scraped and sprinkled with 
salt. The salt is soon removed, the head and gills 
cut off and there is another washing. Then, on 
beds of green brush, the fish are dried in the 
sun. Next they are boiled in olive oil till cooked 
thoroughly. 

" The packers — women always — take them now 
and pack them in the tin boxes we all know, filU 
ing up each box with boiling oil, fitting on the 
lid and making the box air tight by soldering the 
joints together with a jet of hot steam. Sardines 




OKLAHOMA WHITE FACES. 

are more or less perfect, according as they are pre- 
pared more or less immediately after their capture, 
and acpording as the oil they are packed in is 
more or less pure." 

^ *^ ^ 

PAPERMAKING AND THE EGYPTIANS. 



" It is in the spring," said a fish dealer in the Phil- 
adelphia Record, " that the sardine netting begins. 
Genuine sardine are the young of the pilchard. 



The art of paper making is almost prehistoric. It 
is believed that the Egyptians invented the first crude 
process. This is shown in the name itself, which is 
derived from the word papyrus, a reed which grows 
in Egypt and other warm countries. 

The ancient Egyptians made their primitive paper 
from this plant by taking the smooth, fibrous layer be- 
tween the rough outer bark and the inner flesh of the 
reed. This they dried and glued together in long rolls, 
which served as a means to convey their thoughts in 
hierogyphics. This process has been so improvel up- 
on during the succeeding ages that to-day the most 
perfect paper can be made from the meanest sub- 
stances. 



64 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



EDISON ON RADIUM. 



SENDING BEEF ABROAD. 



Thomas A. Edison does not look upon the new 
metal, radium, as a really valuable discovery that prom- 
ises to add much of practical value to the sum of hu- 
man knowledge. Mr. Edison is particularly skeptical 
regarding the theory that this new metal can be used 
to cure human ills. Some of the New York physicians 
have been making experiments with radium to restore 
the sight of a girl who has been blind for years. 
Mr. Edison says the radium might make an impres- 
sion on the optic nerve, provided that nerve had not 
been destroyed, but he thought the use of radium in 
patholog>' was attended with even greater risk than 
that accompanying the use of the Roentgen rays. 

Mr. Edison went on to tell why he did not think 
that radium would accomplish what was hoped for it 
in the cure of blindness. 

" In the first place," said he, " we have a seemingly 
unstable element that is constantly giving off particles 
of itself — that is, it is bombarding near-by objects with 
minute particles, which are propelled through the air 
at a rate of i,ooo miles a second. Now, some effect 
is bound to take place upon an object that falls within 
the zone of this bombardment. The effect upon the 
human flesh is similar to that produced by the Roent- 
gen rays. A form of decomposition sets in and the 
tissues are destroyed, leaving a wound similar to a 
burn. Yet this wound is not like a burn, for it will not 
heal. 

" Apparently the Roentgen rays and the radium ray 
possess in themselves something which tends to de- 
stroy that element in the human body which rebuilds 
and heals after an injury. This characteristic is ap- 
parently totally destroyed in the region which has been 
exposed. Nature makes a desperate effort to repair 
the damage, but by and by the resources of the affected 
limb are exhausted and loss of the member follows. 

" Now, in view of this," continued Mr. Edison, 
" can we look forward with any degree of hope ? 
Say, for instance, that we try to kill the bacilli of tu- 
berculosis, which we know cannot live under the influ- 
ence of light. To accomplish that end we expose a 
patient to the influence of radium. Can we hope to 
kill the bacilli within the trunk of the body and leave 
the skin and intervening tissue clear? I fear not. 

" I have abandoned experimentation with radium, 
for I can see no commercial value in it, and I don't 
tackle anything that I am not sure will work out to be 
of practical benefit. I don't believe radium ever will. 
As far as restoring eyesight to those who have been be- 
reft of it, I think the result is doubtful. I don't be- 
lieve it will ctire deafness and I think its use in any 
way in connection with a living body is attended by 
grnvc dangers." 



Fur a long time there was a prejudice against Amer- 
ican beef in England. This is all removed at the 
present time. In many places in London a sign is 
hung up, indicating that fine Chicago beef may be 
found on the inside. 

Originally the plan was to ship live cattle to Eng- 
land and have the killing done there. This, has been 
changed and it has been found more profitable to 
ship the dressed beef. An especially good quality of 
beef is called for in the European market and it is 
done somewhat after this method. 

The cattle are selected with a view of furnishing 
the best meat, and these are fed in various places on 
corn in order to put the beef at its best possible con- 
dition, and these cattle are then killed and dressed. A 
piece of white cloth, cut to fit the quarters, is sewed 
around each one, and the greatest care is exercised in 
shipping it from the killing place to the steamer. 
No contamination or dirt of any kind is allowed that 
can be prevented. On arriving at the wharf, it is 
loaded on the steamer, and contrary to the popular 
supposition this part of the work requires a great deal 
of care and is a highly specialized part of the labor. 
In the first place the wrapped-up pieces are thrown in- 
to a net which is lifted up by a donkey engine on 
board the vessel, and is then swung around over the 
hold into which it is lowered. Here stalwart men 
think nothing of taking a quarter of from 200 to 300 
pounds on their shoulders and swinging it up on the 
overhead hook. Here is where the skill comes in, as 
the meat has to be hung up so that it does not need 
to be adjusted afterwards. After a row of quarters 
have been hung up, a movable lattice is inserted be- 
tween the quarters, so that they do not rub one an- 
other in transit. 

The principles of cold storage are applied and the 
places are so fixed that they can be got at without 
opening the apartment in which the beef is stored. 
When the shipment arrives in port in Europe, the beef, 
after being inspected, is reshipped in refrigerator cars 
or kept in cold storage rooms. At every place the 
greatest care is taken to preserve the meat from either 
dirt or the appearance of it. In the end the business 
pays, for Europe's meat bill is over a hundred millions 
of dollars a year. 

**** *$* '^ 

Of whites, who contracted tuberculosis during the 
war, one out of two and a half died, while of negroes 
twelve out of thirteen died. 

* 'S' ♦ 

Most of the prepared baby foods contain too much 
fat, and develop the child's weight more than its 
strength. 



THE ingi_e:nook. 



^5 



SOME SMALL REPUBLICS. 



Small as is the new republic of Panama, it is con- 
siderably larger, both in area and population, than 
some of the self-governing " powers '" that are scat- 
tered here and there o\er the continent of Europe. 
It may be news to many that across the ocean 
there are quite a number of flourishing independ- 
ent republics that are seldom heard of. There are 
\arious little states in Europe so isolated from the 
rest of the world that even the mapmakers over- 
look them, yet they govern themselves and are to 
all intents and purposes distinct in themselves. 

One of the most interesting of these Tom Thumb 
republics is Andorra, an almost inaccessible state 
of about 6,800 inhabitants in the eastern Pyrenees. 
Andorra was declared a free state as long ago as 
the ninth century by Charlemagne, and at the pres- 
ent time holds a kind of semi-independent position 
between France and Spain. The republic, how- 
ever, is governed by its own representatives, who 
constitute a sovereign council of twenty-four mem- 
bers, which council elects a president every four 
years. The chief occupations of the Andorranos 
are agriculture, cattle breeding, trade in wood, char- 
coal and wool and especially smuggling. At the 
same time they are good-natured, hard-working, 
hospitable people and are devoted to liberty, which 
they are prepared to defend with a standing army 
of 1,100 men. 

About one hundred and fifty miles from Andorra, 
in the Basses Pyrenees, is to be found another 
miniature republic, which, so far as area is con- 
cerned, has the distinction of being the smallest 
self-governed state in the world. It is called St. 
Goust and is hardly a square mile in area. The 
population numbers about 130 souls, who rule them- 
selves, mainly owing to the fact that the little state 
is so hard to get at that no one will take the 
trouble to alter its constitution. 

St. Goust is situated on a rocky mountain top, 
which is so steep that when anybody dies it is 
impossible to have an ordiiiary funeral. A cof- 
fin could not be carried down the mountain side 
and consequently the inhabitants have cut a groove 
into the face of the rock and the coffin is made 
fast to a rope and allowed to slide down to the 
cemetery in the Ossan valley below, where all bap- 
tisms and marriages are performed. The president 
of St. Gould, who is also tax collector, assessor 
and judge, is elected by a council of twelve, who 
are chosen for five years by the people, the little 
republic having been ruled for more than 2,000 
years through a " council of elders." 

The smallest republican state in regard to popu- 
lation is Tavolara. a little-known island, about five 
miles long, with an average width of half a mile, 



ofl' the north coast of Sardinia. Many maps and 
geography books totally ignore the existence of 
this state. Yet it is a free and independent re- 
public of about seventy inhabitants, who are their 
own rulers. 

The people of Tavolara declared their independ- 
ence in 1886, the island having previously been 
made over in 1S36 by king Charles Albert of Sar- 
dinia to the Bartoleoni famil}'. None of the great 
powers objected when the island threw ofl: the yoke 
of monarchy, and during the last seventeen years 
the inhabitants have lived at peace with the world. 
They elect a president every six years and a coun- 
cil of six members, all of whom serve the state 
without pay. 

Jealousy between Belgium and Prussia has en- 
abled the inhabitants of a tiny territory, called 
Aloresnet, near Aix-la-Chapelle, to enjoy the rights 
of republican citizenship for the last two centuries. 
The two countries mentioned could not agree as 
to who should own Moresnet, and consequently 
they decided to make it neutral country. There 
are about 3,000 persons in iMoresnet, who elect 
their own president and council of five, in whom 
the government of the republic is vested. 

It is also owing to a disagreement between Aus- 
tria and Servia that the folk who have taken up 
their residence on a certain little island in the Dan- 
ube pay no taxes and acknowledge allegiance to 
nobody. The island, which has very appropriately 
been called Nobody's island, was formed many 
years ago by the accumulation of mud and sand 
carried down by the great river during a flood. 
Since then Austria and Servia have been quarrel- 
ing about its possession. 

At low water the island is almost connected with 
the Servian shore by a narrow tongue of land, 
while at high water it lies nearer the Austrian island 
Osztrovaer. Consequently no one can decide to 
whom it really belongs, and as the island is not 
worth enough to make it advisable for the Servian 
or the Austrian government to fight over its possession, 
the inhabitants are left entirely to themselves. 

San Marino, a queer little Italian republic, situ- 
ated among the eastern spurs of the Apennines, 
is somewhat larger than any of the afore-mentioned 
states. This republic has an area of thirty-three 
square miles and a population of eight thousand 
persons. San Marino is governed by a grand coun- 
cil of sixty life members, self-elected, of whom one- 
third are nobles. From this number are selected 
the council of twelve, who superintend agriculture 
and, with the assistance of two foreign lawyers, 
form the supreme court of the state. A standing 
army of I ^o men is maintained, whose chief em- 
ployment, however, is that of acting as policemen. 



66 



HI 



ARTISTIC USES FOR CORN HUSKS. 



INGLEINOOK. 



CoRNHUSK and grass basketry is the latest fad of 
the worker who twists and weaves nature's materials 
into useful and beautiful forms. It is particularly 
apropos at this time of year, when the corn crop is 
being harvested in the great corn belt. Tlie origina- 
tor of this practical idea is a young woman, who be- 
lieves in creating out of the common materials utilitar- 
ian and ornamental things, as the Indians have always 
done. 

The so-called cornhusk baskets belong to the coiled 
school, the weave of which has always been a favorite 
with the best basket makers in the world, because it is 
capable of such a large variation. The foundation 
of these baskets is of grass and sedge, the cornhusks 
being used for padding and to carry out the design. 

For instance, to make a large scrap basket the first 
step is to procure a pound of Manila hemp. Begin 
the basket with the hemp, as the coil is so small it is 
difificult to use the stiff, hard grasses. Sew with raffia, 
as the stitches can be made finer. Then proceed to 
build as the name indicates, with a continuous coil of 
the grass or fiber bound completely together with the 
familiar stitch of the southwestern Indians. This is 
done by sewing with a strong tapestry needle, thread- 
ed with raffia, over the coil and through the stitich un- 
derneath until the top is reached. 

When readv to build the sides, take several strands 
of grass for a foundation and wrap the cornhusk about 
it ; then sew as already indicated. It will thus be seen 
that the baskets are really of grass, the cornhusks be- 
ing merely for ornamentation. In fact, they can only 
be used when wrapped over grass, for the pieces are 
too short for anything else. 

This form of basketry is called the coiled, because it 
is developed from a coil of grass, and takes the shape 
of coiled pottery. Other forms of basketry are much 
more elementary than this one, for in the coiled bas- 
ketry, even though it is simple and constructive in 
character, the builder must know something of design 
and use only those which are harmonious. 

The cornhusk baskets are especially commendable, 
as they are handsome, solid and give wide range of 
coloring for carrying out designs. There are pale yel- 
lows, greens, browns, purples, and reds, which may be 
woven to suit the individual taste. The cornhusks 
should be gathered now, and great care taken in se- 
lecting good colors and firm husks. The larger they 
are the better, for sometimes one can be split in sev- 
eral pieces, and used to wrap a coil of grass. 

In the cornhusk work the design is naturally sub- 
ject to conditions. For example, wrapping on the 
coil gives it a diagonal effect. For this reason it is a 
little difificult to keep the form and control the ma- 
terials unless the worker has a clear idea in mind to 
which she leads up. 



In west Java the Chinese manage to cheat the post- 
office very ingeniously. On sticking a new stamp on 
an envelope he smears the stamp on the face with 
paste or a thin glue. This takes the impression of 
the defacing stamp at the post office and can easily 
be washed off, so that the stamp is once more service- 
able. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

RAPID SHOEMAKING. 



A FAIR of women's shoes made in Lynn. Massachu- 
setts, to establish a record for rapid shoemaking re- 
quired fifty-seven operations and the use of forty-two 
machines and one hundred pieces. All these parts 
were assembled and made into a graceful pair of shoes. 
ready to wear, in thirteen minutes. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
The earliest mention of a double Christian name is 
, that of John Philip Curpel of Fineham, in 1363 A. D. 



Of the grass baskets, one of the prettiest ideas is to 
combine the green stems and the purple blossoms. 
The foundation of such a basket is of coiled hemp, ^' 
like the scrap basket, but in this case the hemp is 
dyed a purple, like the blossom, with vegetable dyes. 
The coil stitch is used exactly as in the corn husk . 
work. When the grasses dry out, as they do in time, 11 
the basket may be refreshed by brushing with a whisk ' 
broom dipped in water. 

Many other things are capable of being coiled be- 
sides corn husks, and few are the localities which do 
not furnish abundant material for the art. Grass, 
sweet grass, broom corn, shredded cattail, split wil- 
lows, and an infinite variety of rushes and sedges are 
invaluable to the worker. The coloring on these 
grasses, which have the advantage of permanency, 
varies at different seasons from rose, purple, brown, 
and vivid red to all the beautiful shades of green, giv- 
ing an almost endless combination of tones. In many 
grasses the smooth and shining stem offers a charming 
contrast to the duller tones of the leaf itself. 

The woman who goes forth for the winter can gath- 
er the leaves of the Georgia pine, the smooth strips of 
the palmetto, and the pliable shoots of the osier wil- 
low. In the west she will find \'ucca and other beau- 
tiful things. During her mountain rambles she can 
gather pine needles for her baskets and mats, and at 
the seashore the rushes and sedges will attract her. 

The chief value of these materials is the fact that 
they are always available and never commercial. They 
can be gathered according to individual taste, without 
depending on the judgment of another, hence the ob- 
ject, when completed, will be an expression of the in- 
dividual instead of an expression of commerce. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
CHEATING THE POST OFFICE. 



the: ingleinook. 



67 



CHANCES ARE VERY SLIM. 



One might be led to believe from the newspaper 
paragraphs about centenarians in various parts of 
the world it is no uncommon thing for a human 
being to round out one hundred years of life. A 
statistician has been making a few calculations 
based upon official data and finds that one's pros- 
pects of attaining such an age are exceedingly slen- 
der. 

Taking 1,000,000 as a basis of calculation, sta- 



te see ninety-nine years, or about one person out 
of 18,500. The century mark will be reached by 
only twenty-three out of the 1,000,000, or, in oth- 
er words, out of a group of 43,500 people born 
at the same time only one will fill the century span 
of existence. 

Only one in 3,000,000 persons will reach the 
age of 104; just one in 5,000,000 can be expected 
to see 105 birthdays, and as to be living 106 years 
oldj these tables place that contingency as out of 
the range of practical calculations. Possibly one 




-A YOUNG ORCH.ARD IN OKLAHOMA. 



tistics show that at the end of seventy years there' 
will still survive 312,000 out of 1,000,000 persons. 
At the expiration of eighty years there will be 107,- 
000 survivors of the original million. When it 
comes to ninety years of existence there is a ter- 
rible thinning of the ranks. Only 8,841 out of 
the 1, 000,000. or one in 115 will live to that age. 
At ninety-seven but 244, or one in 410, will be 
alive. At ninety-eight half of these nearly will 
have dropped out, leaving only 119 souls alive out 
of the original 1,000,000. One's chances to reach 
ninety-eight, according to these tables, is about 
one in 840. 

Of the original 1.000.000 only fift3^-four will live 



human being out of 10,000,000 who shall have seen 
the light for the first time in 1903 will be alive 
in 2009. .J. .J. ^, 

UNIQUE CHURCH. 



St. LuKii's, Cobholm, a district of Yarmouth, is 
unique inasmuch as all workers in connection with it 
give their services. It possesses a voluntary organist, 
a voluntary organ-blower, a voluntary choir, and a 
voluntary bell-ringer. Though new, the church has 
no debt, and is about to provide itself with a clergy 
house. The church, which stands in the midst of a 
working class population, already possesses a mission 
hall and an institute. 



68 



the: ingl.e:nook. 



> O0O000O000O0C5O00000000000000000O00000000O000000000O0O 

o 

o 



-<^-»— 



(v^ 



^ o 
o 
o 
o 



Ou/Z- §Si4^^ecnH^ ^'Va^ixyu'V. 



obooooooooesoooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooco 




'• Love me little, love me long! 
Is the burden of my song: 
Love that is too hot and strong 

Burneth soon to waste. 
Still I would not have thee cold, 
Not too backward, nor too bold; 
Love that lasteth till 'tis old 

Fadeth not in haste." 

♦ * * 
GAGGLE GOO 



The other day I went out by myself a little. We 
live on a side street, and I went back to another street, 
and there I saw some children, and I got to playing 
with them, and when they went into the house I went 
with them. There was a nice woman there and she 
gave me a piece of cake. She asked me my name, and 
[ said •■ Pigeon." "Pigeon what?" said she. "Just 
Pigeon, Pidge," says I. .So after a while she said, 
" Pigeon, you better run along home, now." Then 
she let me out of a side door, and I started to a house 
that looks like the one where we live, and when I 
got there it wasn't ours at all. So I went on and on, 
and the houses got thicker and more of them, and 
then I started to go across the street, and a big street 
car pretty near run over me. It stopped, and the man 
with brass buttons dn said, " Hello, Pidge, where's 
vourMa?" " Over there," I said. "Where?" said 
he, and I pointed all around. Then he said, " You're 
lost." Then I began to cry and he said, " Get on, 
Pidge, and I'll take you along and bring you back to 
your house again." So I got on, together with my 
Foxy Grandpa doll that I never let go, and he said that 
if I didn't stay at home the bears would get me and eat 
me. I told him that the geese would get him, and I 
pointed out the picture of the geese in the car where the 
medicine man had put them. Then everybody 
laughed, and one man just hollered right out in a 
way that wasn't very nice. After a while we got to 
the place where all the cars are, where people are 
getting on and off, the cars going every which way. 
Then the man took me up and carried me back to a 
room, and he said. " We'll see about this, Pidge." So 
he telephoned. 

Now you know that when you are near a telephone 
you can hear a teeny-weeny voice speaking. Tlie man 
asked, " Is" this 2801 ? " " Yes, what's wanted," and 
just as soon as I heard the voice I knew it was Ma. 
" Where's your little girl ? " he said. " Down in the 
garden, playing, why?" "No she isn't," he said. 



" .She's here in the Traction Company's office." Then- 
Ma said in a queer sort of voice, like she was some- 
body else, " Is she hurt?" and the man said, " Naw. 
she was lost and I picked her up at the corner of 
Chester and Dundee streets. I'll bring her back on 
the next trip. You be at the store and I'll hand her 
over to you." 

I never had such a good time in all my life. Every- 
body talked to me. The man at the candv stand gave 
lue three peanuts, a lady bought me an orange, a man 
gaVe me an. apple, and there were other things, too. 
Then the man came back and said, " Now then, come 
on, Pidge," and he took me in the car for the two- 
mile ride. He said to others in the car that he knew 
me because I was the girl that gave him a bite of 
taffy once. He bundled me up and do all I could I 
just had to go to sleep, and in a sort of way I heard 
Ma thank him when he handed me over, and at home 
she just bundled me into bed, and all I heard her 
say was, " Oh, you blessed dirty young one, what did 
the people think you were, — a little pig?" When 
Grandpa came home, and they told him the story of my 
running ofif, he tried to look cross, but he laughed 
and said that there was nothing like having friends 
and acquaintances. And now I daren't go out of 
the garden at all, only when they are with me. Pa 
said he wouldn't be astonished a great deal if I had 
turned up in Chicago. I didn't say a word, but I 
heard it all, and I am not saying anything. 

i{* ^ «s» 
FOR FLOWER PEOPLE. 



Here is something for Inglenookers to remember 
for it is worth while. Let those who are in the vi- 
cinity of a blacksiriith shop where horses are shod, 
get a paper bag full of the hoof parings. In pottmg 
plants put three or four of these pieces in the pot, 
through the soil, before transplanting the plant in- 
tended to grow there. The growth will be something 
phenomenal and is dependent upon the ammonia and 
other fertilizing substances let loose in the decaying of 
the hoof parings. 

The Nookman knows of a place where a blacksmith 
had accumulated a large quantity of these hoof par- 
ings in one corner of his shop. Not knowing what to 
do with them he scattered them over a small piece of 
ground back of the shop where he grew corn. They 
were dug under and the corn planted for roasting-ear 
purposes. This corn grew fifteen feet high without a 



the: ingleinook. 



69 



sign of an ear when the frost caught it. Taking the 
hint from this he has many times used these hoof par- 
ings in flower beds to decided advantage. It is given 
to the Nook for what it is worth. 

Another thing that will produce marvelous results 
in potting plants is to put a piece of raw beefsteak 
about as thick and one-third the size of your hand, 
about two-thirds of the way down into the earth. A 
plant in such a pot will grow marvelously. It is sim- 
ply a matter of furnishing the plant food for its growth 

that does the work. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

GERMAN WAY OF PRESERVING EGGS. 



In a report to the Department of Commerce and 
Labor Consul Richard Guenther, at Frankfort, Ger- 
many, tells ,of a German process for the preservation 
of eggs. He says : 

" German papers state that it is possible to keep 
eggs fresh for any length of time by simply immersing 
them in a ten per cent solution of silicate of soda, com- 
monly called ' liquid glass.' This produces the form- 
ation of a coating which renders the eggs perfectly air 
tight. The eggs so treated retain their fresh taste for 
many months. The best proof of the efficacy of this 
treatment has been furnished by the fact that such 
eggs, after having been kept for a whole year, were 
hatched, and the chickens were strong and healthy. 

" The preserving solution is best prepared by dis- 
solving one pound of liquid glass in four quarts of cold 
water. The eggs are then immersed in this solution, 
which should be kept in a glazed earthenware vessel, 
and the eggs are kept in the solution for a short time. 
If one of these preserved eggs is to be boiled, the 
shell must first be perforated in order to prevent crack- 
ing." 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THINGS FOR NOOKERS TO KNOW. 



IF you heat a bread knife hot you can cut new bread 
as easily as old. 

Put a pinch of sugar in your mustard, it will make 
it taste better and keep longer. 

The best way to clean hair brushes is to take a 
spoonful of ammonia and some water and wash them 
in a wash basin. The ammonia and the water unite 
with the oil in the brush and make it thoroughly clean 
in a short time. 

Try adding a little lemon juice to scrambled eggs. 
Put it in while they are cooking. 

When you get a set of new china, pack it in the 
washboiler with a little hay or straw between the 
pieces. Fill with water gradually and heat until it 
becomes boiling. Then let it cool gradually and your 
china will be much less liable to break than before. 

You cannot have a bad case of rheumatism if you eat 
much cooked celery. 



Take fresh eggs and boil them for a couple min- 
utes in cream, and season with salt and pepper and 
you have a breakfast dish about which there is no 
question. 

♦ * •:- 

HOME DECORATIONS. 



One of the most interesting methods of making a 
rustic bracket is to search through the woods until a 
large fungus growth is found on a tree. These are 
rather common, and a skillful climber with a saw hung 
over his shoulder with a string passed through the 
handle can soon get himself into a position where he 
can saw this off readily so as to get a flat surface to 
fit against the wall in the room. Once he has it in 
his possession on the ground it is an easy matter to 
saw the top ofif perfectly level for the purpose of hold- 
ing whatever he may see fit to put on it. While it is 
yet living green, nails can be driven through the 
growth into the backer board and cut into any shape 
desired. It can then be ornamented by pressed ferns 
or prepared butterflies, according to the skill and taste 
of the artist. 

WHY HE BOUGHT THE IMAGE. 



A CLERGYMAN who was Staying at the house of an 
English workingman happened to see an image of the 
Virgin Mary standing over the mantelpiece, which 
struck him as incongruous. By way of making talk 
he asked how it got there. " Well, you see, sir, it cum 
about this way," replied his host. " I was courtin' o' 
two sisters — Sally and Maria — an' I wusn't just sar- 
tin' which I was to 'ave. One day, as I wor starin' 
into a shop winder, I saw that 'ere statoot, with ' Ave 
Maria ' underneath it. That came right 'ome to me, 
so I med up me mind right off to 'ave Maria ; an' 
we was spliced. She bin a reel gude wife to me, an' 
so I bought the image to keep it in mind." 

^ <« >> 

Charcoal is recommended as an absorber of gases 
in the milk room, where foul gases are present. It 
should be freshly powdered and kept there continually. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

If you want your windows to be nice and bright, 
add a little ammonia to the water and wash thoroughly. 
Use no soap, as it leaves the glass a milky color. 

♦ <» <♦ 

One teaspoonful of ammonia to a teacupful of wa- 
ter, applied with a rag, will clean silver and gold 
jewelry. 

*$•■ ^ ■^ 

Rub your lamp chimneys with dry salt after washing 
and you will be surprised at the new brilliancy of your 
lights. 



70 



THI 



ingl.e:nook 



tt 



(2inni ll^ar&ara^s t^age | 






FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL. 



She is glad to go: how her blue eyes sliinc! 

The longed-for day has come! 
The world of school is opening; 

She has no thought of home. 

I keep her a moment; for, down in m\' hearl. 

There are tears she does not see; 
It will never be just the same again. 

Either to her or me. 

They are always glad to go — ah, yes! 

'Tis the stern world's oldest rule; 
But something goes that never returns 

When the baby goes to school. 

— Fannie Barber Knapp. 
♦ * ♦ 



Lancaster. Wis. 



PLAYING DOCTOR. 



A CEKUAiN Cleveland, Ohio, attorney has two 
bright children. They are quick at imitation, and 
have a talent for making up games in which they 
cleverly burlesque their elders. A few days ago their 
mamma found they were playing " doctor." The 
youngest child was the patient, with head wrapped in 
a towel, and the older the physician, with a silk hat 
and a cane. The mother, unseen by the little ones, 
listened at the doorway. 

" I feel awful bad," said the patient. 

" We'll fix all that," said the doctor liriskly. " Lem- 
me see your tongue." 

Out came the tiny red indicator. 

" Hum-hum ! coated," said the doctor, looking very 
grave indeed. 

Then, without a word of warning, the skilled phy- 
sician hauled off and gave the patient a smart slap 
in the region of the ribs. 

" Ouch ! " cried the sufferer. 

"Feel any pain there?" inquired the doctor. 

" Yes," said the patient. 

" I thought so," said the healer. " How's the oth- 
er side ? ■' 

" It's all right," said the patient, edging away. 

Thereupon the doctor produced a small bottle with 
what looked like either bread or mud in it, and placed 
it on the table. 

"Take one of these pellets," the physician said, 
"dissolved in water, every seventeen minutes— al-ter- 
mit-ly." 

" How long must I take 'em ? " groaned the patient. 
" 'Till you die," said the doctor, " Good mornin'. " 



THE LITTLE SMILE MAN. 



1 

ncY * 



Mildred was pouting, although there was nothin_ 
in particular the matter. 

Mamma was sick. Dick had been teasing her, and 
it rained so she couldn't go out and play, and she 
thought that enough to make any one cross ; so she 
went into mamina's room and stood at the foot of the 
bed and pouted. 

Mamma told her that the rain would make the flow- 
ers grow, that Dick shouldn't tease her any more, and 
that if she would bring her little chair and sit close to 
the bed she would tell her two of the prettiest stories 
she could think of, but still Mildred pouted. 

Would you think she could be so naughty ? 

Then mamma said : " Where did my little girl lose 
her smiles ? " 

Mildred did not answer, but still looked cross, and 
mamma took her tablet and pencil that lay beside her 
on the bed and commenced to write. Very soon she 
said, " Dearie, listen to this letter that I have just 
written," and Mildred pouted while mamma began to 
read : 

Dear Little Smile Man: — My Mildred has lost all of 
her pretty smiles, and looks very cross without them. 
Will you please send her a whole carload of your sweet- 
est smiles, so she can wear one all of the time? 

From Mildred's Mamma. 

And when mamma looked up, Mildred was smiling, 

so the dear little smile man must have replied to the 

letter pretty quick, and he sent such a supply that 

she has worn one most of the time since. — Selected. 

4> * ♦ 

JOHNNIE'S ANSWER. 



" What is an anecdote, Johnny? '' asked the teach- 
er. 

" A short, funny tale," answered the little fellow. 

" That's right." said the teacher. 

" Now, Johnny, you tnay write a sentence on the 
hlackboard containing the word." 

Johnny hesitated a moment and then wrote this : 
" A rabbit has four legs and one anecdote." 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

.\n indolent pussy got into the habit of rocking in 
the baby's cradle, enjoying the motion. As the baby 
grew older it was a regular thing for her to rock the 
cat to sleep, and sometimes, when two naps a day were 
desired and the small girl grew tired, pussy would 
climb up atid contentedly rock himself, balancing 
with his forepaws on the side-rail and purring ec- 
.staticallv. 



THI 



NGLEINOOK. 



71 



M^ 



] Tfie ($♦ & (^* i^epartment* I 



i 



X 



^l/v^ 



Is there any real danger in the precociousness of a 
child? 

As a rule the parents see most of the alleged smart- 
ness, and the Nook recommends that no doctor be 
sent for till the neighbors begin to notice the danger. 
Don't get alarmed until the next-door and across-the- 
street people advise you of the danger you run. 



The Inglenook says that anything will burn. Would a 
house made of steel burn? 

Near enough to a fire it would melt and run down 
in a heap. The nearest an incombustible material is a 
brick, and even a fire brick, under certain heat con- 
ditions has been known to wholly disappear. 

What is a Chinook? I have seen the word in the In- 
glenook. 

The word Chinook is Indian, and is the name of a 
warm wind that comes from over the Pacific Ocean 
where it has been equably heated. It will cut down 
and out of sight a foot of snowfall in a few hours. 

♦ 
What is the temperature above the clouds? 
It has been known to vary from 80 degrees on the 
earth to 74 below zero eight miles above the sea level. 
Miles higher it is perhaps an absolute cold, that is, it 
can get no colder. 

* 
What is asbestos? 

It is a mineral, dug out of the earth, with a long, 
silky fiber when at its best. It can be woven into a 
cloth, and used for any purposes where an unburn- 
able substance is required. The best of it is costly. 

What is pemmican? 

A food product made by pounding dried meat fine, 
sometimes with berries added, and melted tallow 
poured over the mass. It is very nutritious and not 
bad to eat. 

Is the Nookman a vegetarian? 

No, the Nookman is not a vegetarian, but he is 
inclined to believe that it would be better if he were 
and the same is true of most other people. 

Do grown people lake scarlet fever? 

It is thought that adults do not catch the disease, but 
close contagion will induce a sore throat, one of the 
symptoms in grownups. 



Does the Nook advise the use of an incubator on the 
farm? 

It will depend on the farm, the people, and the in- 
cubator. For ordinary barnyard poultry the women 
and the old hens will usually turn out a satisfactory 
product. An incubator is a good thing, but it will 
not run itself, and unless looked after will return noth- 
ing but failure. With intelligence, a good strain of 
chickens in view, and a market worth while, an incu- 
bator is desirable. 

* 

Might it not be the case that animals and insects have 
senses we know nothing about? 

Nothing is truer than that many of them excel us in 

the senses we possess, but it is not clearly established 

that they have others. It is likely that we have all 

the senses that any created thing has, but, as said be- 

'fore, often in less degree of intensity. 

* 

Will poultry food induce hens to lay more eggs than 
otherwise? 

Yes, it will, if a good food, produce more eggs in a 
given time, but it is to be remembered that every 
" peep " contains all the eggs she is ever going to lay, 
and when " laid out " she is done. Proper food makes 
her lay oftener. 

Is there any remedy for the forgetfulness of old people? 
None that the Nook knows. There is no remedy 
for the wearing out of the machine. 

Is there such a thing as a white deer? 
Yes, there are albino or white deer, and the same 
ma)^ be said of all animals. 

How large is a whale? 

They vary according to kind. A black whale is 
sometimes ninety feet long. 

How fast do clouds travel? 

Clouds have been known to do a mile in eighteen 
seconds. Most of them are slow. 

♦ 
What was Napoleon's religion? 

Theoretically he >vas a Catholic, but in practice he 
was all for himself. 

♦ 

What is the difference between scarlet fever and scar- 
latina? 

None at all. Both words mean the same thing. 



the: ingleinook. 



A GOOD PIOUS TALK. 



■' Bkother." said a member of the flock to the 
shepherd, " I wish you would drop in at my house 
some day on your rounds. I feel like it would do 
me good to have a good pious talk with you." 

The pastor kindly assented to the reqtiest, and a few 
days later was seated in the little parlor conversing 
with the good lady while awaiting the return of the 
good man from the fields. 

Sudden!}- there arose a great commotion at the barn 
Horses ran madly about the lot, the geese cackled their 
loudest, chickens flew into trees, and the solemn con- 
versation at the house was interrupted by a powerful 
shouting: "Here, why don't you come here and 
help put up these horses ? Hurry up, I tell you, or 
I'll punch your miserable hides with this pitchfork. 
Whoa Jack, you " 

" Pa, Pa ! " shouted his daughter, running towards 
him. " Pa, the pre "' 

" Shut up your gab, Mandy, and get back in tht 
house, or " 

" But, Pa, the preacher is in the house." 

After a short and very quiet interval a heavy step 
sounded on the porch, the front door was pushed open, 
and the brother came in, singing joyouslv : 

" .-\mazing grace, how sweet the sound. 
That saved a wretch like me! 
I once was lost, but now am found — 
Was blind but now I see." 

He happened to glance into the room where his 
guest was seated ; then, with outstretched hands, he 
greeted him heartily, exclaiiuing in utter astonishment, 
" Why, brother, I had no idea you was anywheres 
about or I wouldn't 'a' been a-singin' so." — Bruce 
Cal: i)i. ill Christinas Lippiiicott. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE SIGHT OF SAVAGES. 



There is a widespread notion, chiefly due, perhaps, 
to the pages of romance, that man in a primitive state 
is possessed of far finer senses than his more civilized 
brother. His practiced eye will detect a moving object 
on the distant prairie which would be quite invisible to 
a European, and his ear would at the same time give 
him warning which would be quite inaudible to his 
educated brother. The superiority of savage man in 
these respects was put to the test during the Cam- 
bridge anthropological expedition to Torres strait in 
1899, the second voluine of the reports of which has 
recently been published. 

This is the first time that any attempt has been made 
to test the senses of savages by skilled observers and 
modern instruments. Most of the observations re- 
ferred to were carried out by Dr. Rivers and Messrs. 
Myers and McDougall on Murray island, and the na- 



tives seem to have heartily cooperated with the experi- 
menters when they learned that the trials were de- 
signed to show how superior they were to white men 
in seeing and hearing. The result of four months' 
careful tests was the deduction that the visual acute- 
ness of the natives was only slightly superior to that 
of the average European. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE WOMAN'S NUMBER OF THE INGLENOOK. 



Articles for this issue of the Nook should be at 
once sent in. They should be short and pointed. 
Ouite a number have been received already. The 
Nook women can do it, beyond a doubt, for they have 1 
done it, and most successfully, too. Not a line of this 
or similar issues is ever set up in type till all the need- 
ed articles have been received. Do not delay your 
contributions, but send them in at once. Nobody need 
be deterred from contributing on account of deficient 
spelling or lack of grammatical forms. All that will 
be corrected here. Strength, not style, will be most 
acceptable. H you have never written before try it 
now. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Blanche Boies, a Carrie Nation kind of woman, 
smashed a large picture, Custer's Last Charge, in 
the State Capitol. Her stated reason was that under- 
neath the painting was a line that said it had been 
presented by a beer firm. All the same she went to 
jail for it. 

♦ * •?• 

Thomas Carroll, of New York, was sentenced to 
a year's imprisonment for burglary. He is seventy- 
eight years old and has served twelve terms in the 
.State prison, aggregating twenty-two years and six 
months. He had been convicted for stealing twelve 
times. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The Colombian troops are reported as being across 
the border in the republic of Panama where they ap- 
parently have gone into a permanent, well-provisioned 
camp, which will be used as a base of operations. 
They propose to make a fight of it and the Ignited 
States ma\- be involved before it is all over. 



Want Advertisements. 



A BRIGHT little girl, eight years old, healthy, strong, 
and of good habits, can be had to raise by the right 
kind of people. She has Brethren ancestry, and goes 
from a Qiristian home to what the mother hopes will 
be the same. This is a fine chance for some one wish- 
ing a bright, helpful little girl, -\ddress, for the par- 
ent's location, with particulars. The Editor of the 
l.\(",LENOOK, Elgin, 111. 



XHI 



INQLENOOK. 



BIG VALUES IN 
TEAM HARNESS. 



OUR CO-OPERATIVE 
PRICES 



Make Every "Equity" Harness a Bargain. 

Sinfjle. double, driving, team, farm— in fact, we will furnish you any kind you want at a lower price than 
any other factory will name. Our co-operative plan of making harness saves considerable in 
the cost of production and selling expenses. Conse- 
quently, we can furnish you a better harness at a lower 
price. 




This No. H. 4t.S. 
high grade Team 

SSly':" $21.50 

Bridles, 

?'3-in. flat 
reins. check 
from 
bames, 
round 
wiuke- 

stays, sensible blinds, XC 
bits. Hjiniet*, high top, wood, 
clip and staple, steel bound. 
Hnme tiigfs. attached to 
hames. Traces, i^-in. x6 ft., 
doubled and stitched, cock- 
eyes sewed in, to buckle in 
hame tugs. Pads, hook and 
terret, heavy wide fold, with 
iJi-in. billets to fasten into 
traces, buckled. HacUstraps, 
iK-in. wide, running through 
to hames. Hip straps, i-in. 
wide, with trace carriers. 
L.iues, 79-in.xiSft. with snaps. 
Breast straps, iM-in., with 
slides and snaps- Pole 
straps. i^2-in. Two hitch 
reins, XC trimmed. 

No. H-468, with collars $24.50 
Less collars 21 .50 

Breenliinjj. suitable for this harness. 

e.vtra $3.00 



round stays, check 
Irom hames. 

Hames, wo od, 
high or low top. 
Traces, j^/ in. dv 
6 ft. Pads; flat, fold- 
ed, j^X in. billets. 
Back straps, 1% in., 
hip straps, i inch. 
Lines. Je in. by 15 
feet, with snaps. 
Breast straps, 1^4 
inch, snaps, slides. 
Pole straps, i^ in., 
XC trimmings. 2 
hitch reins H. 464 with collars, $20.80 
$17.65. Breeching, extra, $3.00 



Former 1 

the 

Dunbar 

Co-Opera- 
tive Co. 
Name 
Changed 
to 

Equity Mfg. & 
Supply Co., 

153, 155, 157, 159 
So. Jefferson St.. 

.CHICAGO. ILL. 



BRETHREN'S 

Plain Clothing 

If you want 

RELIABLE QOOOS, oiadb Uir 
In a tirst-class manner tOU 
at reaaonable prices, we Oin 
satisfy you. 

When you Duy from us 

u OET Q-hat you want. 

hen you buy Irom your 
local dealer, as a rule, you 
TAKE what you can get. 

We always 

guarantee Satisfacttoo 

and refer to our tnany pairona, 
some of whom will be found in 
ncai ly any commiinily where iho 
Brethren reside- Samples of clolh 
from which we make our clothing, 
ring blank, tape line and 

Miles to. ordering will be sent on appUcaliot*. 

Our rules for S2lf-measurement are so simple, any 

cne can understand them. 

We want to hear from you. 

PHILLIPSON TAILORING CO. 




180 Adams St., 



Chicago, 



3t2 Mention llie IXCLENOOK when writing. 

HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSIONS TO 
THE NORTHWEST, WEST AND 
SOUTHWEST, AND COLONIST 
LOW RATES WEST. 

Via the North Western Line. Excur- 
sion tickets at greatly reduced rates are 
on sale to the territory indicated above. 
Standard and tourist sleeping cars, free 
reclining chair cars and "the best of 
everything." For dates of sale and full 
particulars apply to agents Chicago and 
North-Western Railway. . 



Howell County, So. Missouri 

Is the country of to-day forthe homeseeker. The 
best place in the U. S. for a poor man or a man 
of moderate means to get a start in life. It is a 
rolling, timbered country and no prairie. There 
are few spots in the U. S. that ha\e better cli- 
mate—short winters, and summers not so hot as 
in the Northern States. The products are corn, 
wheat, oats, rye, timothy, clover and every- 
tliing that can be raised in tliis latitu'de. It is 
also one of the coming fruit countries of ihe 
U S. West Plains, the county seat, is a good, 
live town of 3,500 people, located on the main 
line of the Frisco R. R. We have lands for sale 
ranging in price to suit everyone. Would you, 
kind reader, like to have a home in this favored 
country? No malaria, etc. No colored people. 
We have just located a few Brethren people 
here and want more We want every reader of 
this paper to write us for our pamphlet. T/ie 
Honieseekers^ Revieisj, land list and map of the 
country. Bank and other references furnished. 
Address at once: 

SIMMONS & EPPS, 

West Plains, Mo. 



♦J. .1*+** »Jv+J++J+***>J^.J.*J..J.+J^.Jm.J«-.J**J*.J. .J^-J. *Jm 



52-1 ■, 



Mention tlie IMGLEKOOK wlien writing 



Job Printing 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 

KRETHREN PUBLISHINQ HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



FOR RENT 

Three choice grain and stock 
farms, near Woodstock, Mc- 
Henry County, Illinois; i6o 
acres at $3.25 per acre, 400 acres 
at $2.25 per acre, and 440 acres 
at $2 per acre. Special terms to 
reliable tenant. Will divide the 
land to suit. Agent, 

R. A. CANTERBURY, 
155 La Salle St. Chicago. 



T 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 



I 



2tf 



50 YEARS' 
ERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anyone sending a sitet eh and deecription may 
(jtilcltly ascertain our oiiinion free whether an 
Inyentinn ia probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictlyconfldential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
^Ecini notice^ without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jliiterican, 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. I.nreest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year; four mouths, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN SCo-s^'^^"^"™^- New York 

Branch OfBce. 625 F St.. Washington. D. C. 



ON THE DOWN GRADE 



Said a business man the other day : " Why is it 
that I cannot work as I used to? I once thought I 
could do any amount of work and still feel fresh and 
strong ; but now when night comes I am all tired out, 
my head aches, my back feels as if it were broken, and 
1 ache all over, and in the morning I feel as if I were 
all rusty. The fact is, I am fast getting to be good for 
nothing." 

Few people know how many men there are who feel 
that way, and it is not only men, but an equal number 
of busy housewives who feel as if they were almost 
worn out. Such people are in need of something 
which will strengthen their systems and permanently 
relieve by purifying and invigorating the blood. They 
are on the down-grade physically and unless their 
course is checked, they will soon find themselves the 
victim of a specific disease and become almost hope- 
less invalids. 

Of remedies of genuine merit there is probably no 
preparation which has met with such marked success 
in building up the system and restoring shattered 
nerve-power as DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITAL- 
IZER. Thousands have testified to its power and ef- 
ficiency. 

GAVE COURAGE TO LIVE. 

Bronaugh, Mo., Jan. 29th. 
Dr. P. Fahrney. Chicago, III. 

Dear Sir: — Your Blood Vitalizer is doing much good 
here. All who have used it say it is excellent. I will tell 
you what the remedy has done for us. 

Our daughter was very weak and sickly. She was un- 
able to work and suffered from some defect in the blood. 
She had terrible headaches, vomiting spells, boils, and 
would wake up in the night in frightened dreams. She 
often said it were better if she could pass away. She 
commenced using the Blood Vitalizer and after having 
taken one bottle she realized that the medicine was help- 
ing her. She kept on using it with steady improvement 
until she got well. She commenced to get stronger right 
away and got courage to live. She also increased in flesh 
and was able to go to .work again. She says herself that 
the Blood Vitalizer saved her life. I myself have also 
used the remedy. I suffered for years with my stomach 
and nothing helped me. In fact I got worse day after 
day. I felt finally so weak that my legs would hardly 
carry me. I was dizzy, absent-minded and suffered with 
pains in my back over the kidneys. My limbs and feet 
were swollen and so painful I could not sleep at night. I 
commenced a regular treatment with your Blood Vitalizer 
and can truthfully say the remedy has saved my life too. 
I feel as spry as a fish in water. I thank you for the 
blessing of your medicine. Yours truly, 

Albert Eiben. 



LIKE A FLOWER IN BLOOM. 

Loper, Pa., Sept. nth, 1903. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — As I have never before related to you the 
wonderful effects of your Dr. Peter's Blood Vitalizer, I 
will do so now. I have had two cases in my own family 
where your remedy has shown its worth. Our daughter 
had been sick for over three years. She had no appetite 
and coughed a great deal. She was reduced almost to a 
skeleton, but what a wonderful effect your Dr. Peter's 
Blood Vitalizer had upon her! After using a few bottles 
of the remedy she is entirely well and as rosy cheeked as 
a flower in bloom. Also our little boy had been sick for 
a long time with, it seemed, endless doctoring to no avail. 
I commenced to give him the Blood Vitalizer too, and 
there has been no need of a doctor since. 

Gratefully yours, 

A. Gardner. 

A HAPPY WIFE. 

Newark N. J.. July 6th, 1903. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — We have now had your Blood Vitalizer in 
our home for over ten years, and I must say it has done 
a great deal of gopd. My wife was obliged to keep her 
bed almost continually. She had been a sufferer for 
many years with some form of stomach trouble. Since 
we have had your medicine in the house she is happy 
and recommends it to all sufferers. She says your rem- 
edy is better than anything she has ever come across. 

Yours truly. 
J. C. Ruschenberger. 

Do you wish to gain strength, to gather flesh, to ac- 
quire an appetite, to enjoy a regular habit of body, to 
obtain refreshing sleep, to feel and know that every 
fiber and tissue of your system are being braced and 
renovated? If so commence a treatment with DR. 
PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER at once. The very 
first bottle will convince you of its merits. DR. PE- 
TER'S BLOOD VITALIZER is not an article of 
commercial traffic. It is not put up in a humdrum 
way for the purpose of sale but is prepared with the 
most scrupulous care and exactness as a medicine for 
sick people. Every bottle, as it leaves the laboratory, 
is supplied with a registered number and is dulty re- 
corded. For good reasons, Dr. Peter Fahrney does not 
supply the BLOOD VITALIZER to druggists or oth- 
ers interested in " traffic " goods, but supplies is to be 
people direct through special agents appointed in every 
community. For further particulars address the sole 
and only proprietor. 



OR. PETER FAHRNEY. 



112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, III. 



Several Handsome Premiums. 



One of the things that nearly everybody wants, and certainly e\'erybody finds occasion to use from 
time to time, is a fountain pen. Now the Inglenook has a number of Laughlin Fountain Pens, in both 
ladies' and gentlemen's style. These pens are advertised and sold by the thousands, and readers of high- 
priced magazines ha\e often seen them advertised. They come in boxes, accompanied by an arrange- 
ment to fill them with ink; have a gold pen, and they are as fine a Fountain Pen as you will likely find 
anywhere for the money. These pens sell for one dollar, and we will make you a present of one if you get 
two new subscribers for the Inglenook. 



^>J THE TRIO 




Almost any Nooker can get two of his neighbors to take the Inglenook for a year and get, for his 
trouble, one of these beautiful and effective Fountain Pens. Remember, that for two new subscribers you 
will get the pen. 

Where is the boy, or man or woman for that matter, who does not need a knife? Now, it so hap- 
pens, that we have in our possession a number of well-made pocket knives which we intend to give away 
to our friends. Anybody who sends in one new subscriber will receive by return mail, for his trouble, this 
substantial pocket-knife. The Inglenook editor has carried one of these around with him all over the 
United States, or that part of it which he has visited in the interest of the Nook family. It is a strong 





knife and one that will last for many a year. It is made by the Lawton Company, of Chicago, and on re- 
ceipt of one new subscriber, which any present Nooker will get, we will remember him with a pocket- 
knife that will last him a good part of a lifetime, if he does not lose it. We do not guarantee against loss 
but we will guarantee this knife to be a good one. This knife would sell for 50 cents in a regular store. 

Now every woman likes to have a knife just 
as well as a boy or man and she can put it 
to more usage than any man or boy would 
ever think of doing. To provide for her we have a beautiful little pearl-handled knife with two blades, 
just such a knife as a lady would like to have and will cost at least 75 cents if bought at a hardware store. 

Now whoever sends in two new subscribers for the Inglenook is going to gefone of these knives. 
It is a stout, well-built knife, big enough for any purpose for which a penknife may be used, and our guar- 
antee with this is, that after you get it if you lose it you will be sorry. 

Now, furthermore, suppose you start out to get new subscribers for the Inglenook, and nobody 
knows how to talk it up better than those who have read it, and you are one of them. Suppose you get 
one new subscriber, that means a knife for yourself if you happen to be of a masculine persuasion. 

Supposing that you find it easy to get another subscriber, you have a chance to get the Fountain 
Pen: and if you get two more, making four in all, you can have the Ladies' Knife and the Fountain Pen, 
both of them handy things to have about. Do the best you can, and that is the best done by beginning 
right away. The kni\-es and pens are ready for you and will be sent from this office on receipt of the 
subscriptions. 



lESlg^in., Illinolss. 



I3!o"ia.so. 



the: ingleinook. 



^J*H*^*v*S*' 



The Qospel Messenger 



lA i6-Page Weekly: 



Devoted entirely to the interests of the Brethren church 
and the cause of Christ. It contains spicy articles on 
live topics written by the ablest thinkers and writers in 
the church. If you are not familiar with it, drop us a 
card and we will take pleasure in mailing you a sample 
copy. 

Special Combination Offer. 

Gospel Messenger, one year, = « - = $i 50 
The Book •■ Eternal Verities," by D. L. Miller, ^tf"J" '25 



BOTH rOGETHER, EITHER OLD 
OR NEW SUBSCRIBERS, . . . 



$1.75 



BRETHREN PUB ISHINQ HOUSE, 

ELUI.N, ILLINOIS. 



rV V V V ^ 



The Busy Man's Friend... 




Here is a book for you. The Busy 
Man's Friend is a book that we give away. 
It is not very large. You can carry it in 
your coat pocket, but it is full, from cover 
to cover, of things that every man ought to 
know. It is made up of the odds and ends 
cf information in regard to everyday knowl- 
edge, such as matters of legal interest, 
measurement of buildings, and rules of ac- 
iion generally Just what you want to 
know and don't know where to find it. 
It is all in the Busy Man's Friend, the 
book that we give away. Thousands and 
thousands of them have been put out to 
the entire satisfaction of those who got 
them. Have you had yours yet? If not 
here is the way you can get it: Send us the 
name of one new subscriber to the Ingle- 
nook Magazine, remitting $1.00 with your 
order, and wc will send you the book free 
of charge for your trouble and also place 
the new name on the mailing list from now 
on until the end of the year 1904. 

You may be a busy man yourself. If so, 
you want a friend of like tastes. That is 
the book, for The Busy Man's Friend con- 
tains just what you want to know without 
wasting your time looking it up in other 
places. See that you get that book aa soon 
as the mails can brin^ it to you. 



Brethren Publishing House, 



. 



♦♦♦♦♦ ^ - » » - t - - t - - x - * » ■:■ ■!■ i- ■!■ -v '}■ -i- * -v » 'I- * * 

Free! Fr^ei! 

Our 1903-04 64 -page 

Book and Bible... 
-^^^Catalogue 

V V V 

It contains many handsome cuts of 
books and Bibles and gives full descrip- 
tion and price of same In fact it is the 
largest and most complete catalogue 
ever put out by the House. Order it 
now. A postal card will bring it to you. 

Address 

Brethren Publishing Bouse 

El^in, Illinois. 



Elgin, Illinois. 



Would You Know 

Of some Christian endeavor in India, 
Africa, Europe, South America, North 
America, the Islands of the Sea? 

The Missionary Visitor 



Is covering these fields in a most' 
practical way, publishing that which 
is of immediate interest for its I'ead- 
ers. Special issues have been pub- 
lished on India, China, Africa and 
Australia, South America and Japan. 
A practica and helpful 

Missionary Reading Circle Coarse 

conducted n each issue, with helps 
for young people's meetings, etc. 
The Visitor contains illustrations 
pertaining to the reading matter di- 
rect. Thirty-two pages monthly, 
neatly bound, with cover. Subscrip- 
tion price, 50 cents per annum. Three 
months trial, lo cents. ;: :: ;: :: 

<S> ^ «> 



, ADDRESS . 



Brelhren Publishing House, 

ELGIN, LLINOIS. 



the: in<3i_e:nook. 



THE COLONY 



..ON... 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



CONSTIPATION NEEDS A 
CURE. 



...IN? THE. 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
F. Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of 1901 
and were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 

1902, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19, 1902, a Brethren church was organized with a. membership of 13. 
There are now 54 members. 

May II, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8, 

1903, the building shown above was completed and on July 12, 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by forty in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
they will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
ister is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all, 
is here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies of Cali- 
fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
forty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
day in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
newspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

5Ttl3 Mention the rXOLENOOK when writing 



A simple relief only is not suf- 
ficient, especially if the relief is 
brought about by the use of salts, 
aloes, rhubarb, or some similar 
purgative or cathartic. They 
temporarily relieve, but they 
weaken the bowels and make the 
condition worse. In constipation 
the bowels require strengthening, 
toning, and something that will 
assist them to do their work nat- 
urally and healthfully — in short 
a tonic laxative of the highest or- 
der. That is what Vernal Saw 
Palmetto Berry Wine is. It both 
relieves and permanently cures by 
removing the cause of the diffi- 
culty. It positively cures dys- 
pepsia, indigestion, kidney and 
liver troubles, headache and all 
other diseases which grow out of 
sick and clogged bowels. One 
small dose a day will cure any 
case, light or bad. It is not a pat- 
ent medicine. The full list of in- 
gredients goes with every pack- 
age with explanation of their ac- 
tion. It costs nothing to try ii. 
A free sample bottle for the ask- 
ing. Vernal Remedy Co., 115 
Seneca Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 
All leading druggists sell it. " 




No Guessing 

Yon know in advance v.hat will 
come i f theegg:s are ferti le when 
you use the self-reg^uiatJn^ 

Successful 

Incubators and Brooders 

Tlie macliines for busy people and the inexperienced be- 
cause they run themselves. That's _. .— - 
the unqualified experience of thou- •'''0 
sands. The same under all conditions. 
Eastern onlers have prompt shipment 
from the BulTalo House. 100 pens of 
Standard fowls. Incubator catalugrue 
free, with poultry catalogue ten cents. 

Des Moines 
Incubator Company, 

Dept. 441, 

Des Moines, Ca. 




MDAYS TRIAL 
5 Years Guarantee 

OLD TRUSTY 

Incubators. 




Good, Honest Incubators made by Johnson, 
the incobator man. 3 walls, 2 dead air spaces, 
improved copper heating system. Will use 
about H as much oil as the old makes. Price 
$10.00 for 120 egg size, other sizes in propor- 
tion. Quick shipments a specialty. Johnson v.i\\ Send 
you his new incubator and poultry ad%Tcebook. It shows 
how to keep your e(^g records. "Writeforittoday. It'sfree. 
M. M. JOHNSON, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA. 



Mention the INGLLNOOK when -A-riting 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 



333-335 Dearborn St., "That's the Pk»ce." 



CHICAGO. ILL. 



To Oat^ pmends 



The constant increase in the volume of orders that we are receiving daily from the readers of the loglenook 
proves to us that we have made a friend of everyone that has patronized us during the past year. We 
— ... - - _^ appreciate this confidence in us very much and shall always endeavor to handle our business in a manner 

that will prove us worthy of the same. We guarantee every article to be exactly as represented and will replace any that are not satisfactory, or will refund 
the money sent us. together with transportation charges. Your orders will be given very careful attention and will be tilled promptly. 



Alarm Clock (hat Does Alarm! 

The accomi)anying cut 
is a small illustration 
ol our Parlor Alarm 
Clock. This beauti- 
ful clock is made 
with a cast iron case, 
g^un metal finish, and 
has scroll ornamen- 
tation, as shown in the 
illustration. The 
alarm bell is skillfully 
concealed in the base 
of the clock and has an 
extremely long and 
'• loud ring, making it a 
sure awakener. 
The movement is the very best and is guaran- 
teed for two years. Will run thirty hours 
without winding. If you forget to wind it at 
night it will be running the next morning. It is 
dust proof and practically indestructible. 
It is fully worth five ordinary alarms, being the 
most durable and substantial everolTered. 
5^ inches high, weighs 35^ pounds, and 0t AA 
will he shipped by express upon receipt of qlKvv 





27 PIECES— 6 knivep*. 6 forks. 6 
tablespoons, 6 teaspoons, 1 butter knife, 1 
sugar shell, 1 picklefork, of the ROGERS' 
STERHXG BRAND, finest coin silver 
plate, in a fine, satin-liued, brocaded 
velvet case, exactly as shown in the small 
Illustration. This offer is genuine, and we 
guarantee satisfaction absolutely, and will re- 
turn yonr n\oney if you do not find the goods 
exactly as represented. Over 200 of these 
sets now in use in 'Nookers' homes, and all 
giving satisfaction. The set weighs about 7 
pounds and will be shipped by express on re- 
ceipt of $2.56 from readers of the Inglenook. 

Aluminum Salt & Pepper Shaker. 

Two pieces, each 2% inches 
high. 1^ inches m diameter, ex- 
actly as shown in the illustration, 
made of solid aluminum, 
satin finish and polished, sim- 
ilar in appearance to sterling sil- 
ver. Fitted with bevel tops, 
which are always secure, yet 
easily reuu»ved for filling. Use- 
ful and ornamental. Our spe- 
cial offer to Nook readers. One 
set sent postpaid with our ^A/* 
catalogue for 6rWv 

This \\'agon Jack is made 
entirely of Iron, is easy 
operate and is self-lockin 
and self-adjusting. The 
hundreds of satisfied cus-- 
tomers that are now using it 
proves it to be the most per- 
fect Wagon Jack made. It 
I weighs 8 pounds and will lift 
^8,000 pounds. Price, 65 cents , 





Table Cutlery 

In order to meet the many inquiries we have 
received from the readers of the Inglenook 
we submit the following offers of Table Cut- 
lery. This cutlery is the very best to be had 
and cannot be duplicated for the same money 
elsewhere. The forks and blades are of the 
best steel, finished in the best of workmanship, 
and are not case hardened iron as is usually 
offered. If ordered by mail send 35 cents ex- 
tra per set. 

A 38.— Single bolster, straight steel blade, 
cocobolo handle, set of 6 knives and 6 forks 
for 83 cents 

A 39. — Same as above, with black ebony 
handles 99 cents 

A 40. — Single bolster, scimeter steel blade, 
just as illustrated, cocobolo handle, set of 6 
knives and 6 forks, for 96 cents 

A 41. — Same as A 40 but black ebony han- 
dle $1.10 

/."il.l'i.'lll .„■ .,...„- .■■;'■. \Z'^S^^^^^S^~ 



A 42. — Double bolster, straight steel blade, 
cocobolo handle. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks 
for 98 cents 

A 43. — Double holster. Scimeter steel blade, 
cocobolo handle — just as illustrated. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks for $1.00 

A 44. — Single bolster, straight steel blade, 
uval swell cocobolo handle. Set 6 Knives and 
6 Forks for $i-oo 

A 45. — Same as above, but Scimeter blade, 
; r,,; ;.;,- ■-„;■-,■ • ' ^^'^^ 

A 46. — Double lap bolster, Scimeter blade, 
polished oval swell cocobolo handle. The very 
best to be had. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks 
for $1-57 

Kitchen Knife Set 




A 47. — Bread Knife, i Cake Knife and i 
Paring Knife, made of the best cold rolled 
nickeled steel and will give satisfaction. The 
handles are firmly swaged to the blades and 
will not come loose. Per set of three Knives, 
16 cents 



Special Handkerchief Sale 

A-4 S. — Genuine 
linen 12 x 12-inch la- 
dies' handkerchief 
with 1 inch fancy 
drawn stitched bor- 
der trimmed alt 
around with one-half 
inch French Valen- 
ciennes edging. A 
very dainty article, 
as illustrated. Each, 
postpaid, ...10 cents 

A 49. — Ladies scalloped edge silk embroid- 
ered handkerchief. One corner with a hand- 
some floral design embroidered in silk in as- 
sorted colors. Per dozen, postpaid, .. .60 cents 





Comfortable Rocker 




Large and roomy; made of good stock; high 
ly polished; made in oak or elm; guaranteed 
the lowest priced comfort chair sold. Has 
high back and broad top slat; a bargain. 

A 50. — In oak %2.20 

A 51. — In elm $2.10 



Seod all Orders to Albaugh, BfOS., Dovef & Co., 323=325 Dearborn St., Chicago, III. 



mlNSL-EKDOK, 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




The poandation of flll Wealth. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



January 26, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 4, Volume VI 



THE INGUENOOK. 



' Falls City, Nebr. ' 

; S. B. Fahkestock, Sec, McPherson, Kansas. I 

' Dear Bro: — After greetings to you, ... I am very glad to hear of the large ' 

enrollment at the college this year. I hope and pray that you will have a glorious and ; 

prosperous year. ' 

My eight children have all been at McPherson College, and are now all in the | 

church. May the good Lord help us to hold out faithful to the end. ' 

I do not say it to flatter you, but say it because it is true, that the McPherson | 

College is sending out a great influence for good in the western country, and by coming ' 

in contact with those of other schools I am convinced that McPherson College excels. ; 

So I bid you Godspeed. Go on in the good work. You are sowing good seed. ' 

Though clouds may rise and sometimes the future may look dark, yet press onward and ; 

upward, your work is telling. 

Yours fraternally, 
George Peck. 

McPherson College, Kansas, emphatically the people's college. Everybody is ad- 
mitted on the basis of character, without examination. j. 
The school stands for the brotherhood of man. The doors stand wide open for the ; 
American youth who are destined to direct the affairs of the church and country. We 
educate the head, the heart and the hand. Do not attend a college for the purpose of 
learning how to get money without earning it. Attend for the purpose of becoming 
stronger and nobler; to become more efficient in preaching and practicing the gospel of 
service. 

; Enrollment over S30 and still they come. Wake up. Here is a chance. If you 

don't want us to knock at your door with a battering ram, write us at once. 

' We still want some students to do work for part expenses. McPherson College is 

doing well in numbers, in Christian education and in character building. 

Mcpherson college. McPherson, Kansas. ^ 



FRUIT TREES! 

Complete Assortment Small Fruits, Roses, 
Shrubbery, Evergreens, etc. Clean, strong, 
healthy stock, well rooted. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction. Club raisers wanted in every neigh- 
borhood. Special inducements now. Write for 
terms and prices. 48113 

E. MOHLER. Plattsburg, Mo. 

M«Dtion the INGLENOOK when writing. 



CHEAP RATES 

ON 

Household Goods and 

Personal Effects 

TO AND [FROM 



Colorado, California, Washiagton, 
Oregon, Utah, 

And All Principal Points West 



Through cars from Chicago with- 
out transfer or rehandling of goods 
en route. Write for rates. Map 
of California free on application. 
If not interested, kindly mention 
to friends who are. = 

Trans^Continental Freight Co., 

325 Dearborn Street, Chicago. 

a6 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

506 So. Broadway, Los Angeles. 

46tI8 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



SAVE JOUR HAIR 

Dr. H. F. Knoblauch's 

GERMAN HAIR TONIC 

Is positively known to cure baldness in from 
three to six months; restore gray hair to its 
natural color in three weeks; remove dandruff 
in four applications; stop hair Irom falling out 
and cure all diseases of the scalp. It is no dye 
and is positively harmless. Every bottle guar- 
anteed. 50-cent and Si. 00 sizes. Sent by express 
to any address upon receipt of price. Express 
charges prepaid in lots of three Si. 00 bottles or 
more. Agents wanted. 

THOMAS BROTHERS, 
44 N. Clark St.. Chicago, III. 



lU 



Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



Stock of hardware and store building in a 
good North Dakota town. Doing a good busi- 
ness and it will increase rapidly as the country 
settles up. This is a good farming country 
and we have no competition, and a good chance 
for some one to build up a large trade. There 
is a large congregation of German Baptists at~ 
this place and they also have a church here. 
Our stock is all new and will invoice about 
$2,500. The building and lots at $i,6oo- 
Will sell at a bargain if taken at once. 

Address: 

McCUTCHIN & SON, 

it4 SURREY, NORTH DAKOTA. 

Uention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



To Advertise 



••• /?^,« 



Judiciously is an art, and many make 
a failure because they lack knowl- 
edge. Advertisers will be helped by 
our advertising experts, in securing 
the best possible results. 

Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



NEW CURE FOR 

Catarrh 



SENT ON TRIA.L FREE. 




WHY SUFFER LONGER 



When a Positive Cure is at Your 
Command and only Await- 
ing a Trial ? 



Don't take medicines in the stom- 
ach to kill germs of Catarrh in the 
head. Nothing but air can reach the 
home of these germs, and wrhen it is 
medicated by passing through the 
Inhaler, the germs are completely 
destroyed. Cures Catarrh, Head 
Colds, Bronchitis, Headache, La 
Grippe and all diseases of the air 
passages yield as if by magic. 

No Money Wanted. 

I will mail any readers of the In- 
glenook one of my new Co-ro-na 
Medicators, with medicine for a 
quick home cure, on FIVE days trial 
free. If it gives satisfaction, send 
me $1.00 (half price), if not, return it 
at the expired time, which will only 
cost you 3 cents postage, and you 
will not owe me a penny. Write to- 
day. Agents wanted. Address: 

E. J. WORST, 
10 Main St., Ashland, Ohio. 

Ml Menllfn the INfiLKNOOK when writing. 



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the price asked, return it at our expense. 

Address: Brethren Publishing House, // state. 

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t 

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♦ 

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Please Remember that the First Installment Must Accompany Your Order, -vsrhich 
Amount ■will be Refunded if the Books are not Entirely Satisfactory. 



►'V'V '** W %• ••* V V V V ^f*' 



^f^fj^J^^f^f^f^^J^fJifJ^f^^.^^^^^t^f^t^f'^t^f^fJIt^e^^ ^ 






HI 



ingl_e:nook. 



STERLING, 



THE COLONY 



..ON.. 



COLORADO LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



Just the place you are 
looking for. 

Come and See It. 



Do you want to buy or rent an 
irrigated farm in the 

South Platte 
Valley 

Where people are prosperous 
and contented? 



The climate guarantees health. 
Irrigation means big, sure crops. 
Denver and the great mining 
camps near by, pay good prices 
for everything you raise. 



Sterling's population is i,8oo, 
and growing. A town of churches 
and schools. No saloons or places 
of iniquity. Three railways. Union 
Passenger Station, water works, 
electric lights, etc. 



Write us for Free Advertising 
Matter, Railroad Rates and Ex- 
cursion Dates. 



The Colorado Colonj Co., 

S ig, C) orado. 



REFERENCES-Geo. L. McDoniugh. Breth- 
ren Colonization Agent U. P. R. R., Omaha, 
Neb.; Eld. D. D. Culler, Principal Sterling Public 
School; Rev. A. W. Ross. Brethren Church, 
Sterling, Colo.: any bank or business house 



4ti3 



Jlention the INGLKNOOK when writing. 



IN THE 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




I 



BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
r, Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of 1901 
ind were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 
(902, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19, 1902, a Brethren church was organized with a membership of 13. 
There are now 54 members. 

May 11, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8, 
1903, the building shown above was completed and on July 12, 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by forty in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
ihey will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
l^ter is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all, 
is here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies of Cali- 
Fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
lorty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
day in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
newspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

5ltl3 Mention the INHLENOOK when '«Tltlii« 



the: ingleinook. 



ARE YOU GOING 



,.TO.. 



...CALIFORNIA... 

Lordsbnrg, the Laguna De Tache 
[Grant, Tropico 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

...Union Pacific Railroad... 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, 
Utah and California Points. 



READ THJS. 



Glendora, Cal.. Jan. 5th, 1904. 
Yes. I am here, and I came here over the Union Pacific 
Route, and I am free to say that the scenery along that 
line, especially for two or three hundred miles before ar- 
riving at Sacramento, Cal., excelled anything I have ever 
seen in all my travels. It is an inspiration — view it as 
you may. Here the Bible student drinks deep from the 
fountain from whence the Bible came. The scientific 
student here enjoys a rare feast. These things show the 
handiwork of the greatest artist. A. Hutchison. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 

E. L. LOMAX, Q. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



STEELING, COLO, 

Well Adapted for Beet Sngar', Factory. 



sterling has a population of 1,800. 

It is the best town in northeastern Colorado, 

It is the county seat of Logan county and within one mil& 
of the South Platte river. 

Sterling has three railway lines and the finest Union Pas- 
senger Station for a town of its size in the western States. 

Distance from Omaha to Sterling 430 miles, Sterling to 
Denver 140 miles. 

Sterling has a splendid water works system which fur- 
nishes water from Springdale six miles away, said to equal 
the water of Battle Creek, Mich. 

An electric light plant with arc lights on principal business 
and residence corners. 

Stone and cement sidewalks along principal streets. 

Large brick school buildings, including County High School, 
first class teachers, free school books. 

Six churches, no saloons or dives of any kind. 

Two banks, three hotels, three lumber yards, cream sepa- 
rator station, two " up-to-date " newspapers, mercantile 
houses of all kinds carrying first class stocks of goods at rea- 
sonable prices, etc., etc. 

The principal fraternal orders are well represented and the 
Sterling Club, with 90 members, includes many of the most 
prominent business and professional men, farmers and ranch- 
ers in the county, occupying perhaps the finest quarters be- 
tween Omaha and Denver. 

An active Chamber of Commerce is pushing the develop- 
ment of Sterling and Logan county and have signed contract 
for the erection of a Beet Sugar Factory to cost over half a 
million dollars and with a capacity of 600 tons of beets per 
day. Two thousand five hundred acres were planted to sugar 
beets this year for a test crop and contracts signed for 6,000 
acres for 1904. 

X-OCrAN COUNTY. 

This is one of the best farming and stock raising counties 
in the West. 

It is 48 miles long and 36 miles wide, contains 1,105,920 
acres, of which about 70,000 acres are under a perfect system 
of irrigation and the balance used for free pasture and graz- 
ing, mostly government land. 

The 70,000 acres are in the great South Platte Valley, which 
is noted for its immense crops of alfalfa, wheat, rye, oats, 
barley and other grains, vegetables, sugar beets and small 
fruits, melons, etc. 

Population of county about 6,000, mostly American. The 
German and Scandinavian as well as other nationalities are 
well represented. 

The people are intelligent, hospitable and generally prosper- 
ous, — 90 per cent are from the middle and eastern States, the 
earliest settlers were from the extreme southern States, in- 
cluding Alabama and Mississippi. 

Taxes are low, owing considerably to the large railway 
mileage. Best land and water for irrigation $30 to $50 per 
acre, according to location and improvement. — Logan County 
(Colorado) Advocate. December 24th. 1903. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Sterling, Colorado, 

AVrp pipp Plus $3.00, for the Round Trip First 
UnC rAIli; and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



¥ rx A ¥ > /^ is the best-watered arid Stat* in America. Brethren are moving there because hot winds, 
\_ I 9 f^ I i \_/ destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate it makes life 
bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to ofifer to the prospective settler and if you have in miad a change 
for the general improvemeBt in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, 
we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that 
ii, {o and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to answer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad tare* t« 
investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to alt principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see foryonr- 
self. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 






Settlers' One=way Rates rom March 1 to April 30, 1904 

FROM To Pocatello, Huntington, 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa, etc. 

Chicago $30 00 $30 50 

St. Louis, 26 00 27 50 

Peoria, 28 oo 28 50 

Kansas City and Omaha, 20 00 22 50 

Sioux City 22 90 25 40 

St. Paul and Minneapolis 22 90 25 40 




MODEL RANCH IDAHO. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. 



Fine 



Nampa, Idaho. ^ 

I came to Idaho two yean ago from the best part of eastern Kansas. I had done no work for a year oa ac- ^ 

count of poor health. One year here brought me all right and this year I farmed and made more money from ^ 

80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my potatoes were ahead, noaking 600 ^ 

bushels per acre. Joshua Jambs. ^ 



S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 

J. H. QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



D. E. BURLEY, ^: 

G. P. &T. A., O. S. L. R. R., %; 

Salt Lake City, Utah. %■ 



■«Btion the INGLENOOK when wntiB«. 



ml NSbEKSOK 



Vol. VI. 



January 26. 1904. 



No. 4. 



SOMETIME. 



BY ir.W KILEY SAIITH. 



Sometime, when all life's lessons have been learned. 

.And sun and stars forevermore have set, 
The things which our weak judgment here has spurned, 

The things o'er which we grieved with lashes wet. 
Will flash before us, out of life's dark night, 

.\s stars shine most in deeper tints of blue; 
.■\nd we shall see how all God's plans were right. 

.And how what seemed reproof was love most true. 

.'And we shall see how. while we frown and sigh, 

God's plans go on as best for you and me: 
How, when we called, he heeded not our cry, 

Because his wisdom to the end could see. 
.And e'en as prudent parents disallow 

Too much of sweet to craving babyhood. 
Sn God, perhaps, is keeping from us now 

I^ife's sweetest things, because it seemeth good. 

And if. sometimes, commingled with life's wine. 

We find the wormwood. 'and rebel and shrink. 
Be sure a wiser Hand than yours or mine 

Pours out this potion for our lips to drink. 
And if some friend we love is lying low. 

Where human kisses cannot reach his face, 
O, do not blame the loving Father so. 

But wear your sorrow with obedient grace! 

-And you will shortly know that lengthened breath 

Is not the sweetest gift God sends his friend. 
And that, sometimes, the sable pall of death 

Conceals the fairest boon his love can send. 
If we could push ajar the gates of life. 

And stand within, and all God's workings see. 
We could interpret all this doubt and strife. 

And for each mystery could find a key! 

But not to-day. Then be content, poor heart! 

God's plans, like lilies, pure and white unfold; 
We must not tear the close shut leaves apart. 

Time will reveal the chalices of gold. 
-And if, through patient toil, we reach the land 

Where tired feet, with sandals loosed, may rest, 
When we shall clearly know and understand, 

I think that we will say, "God knew the best!" 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



Xoise doesn't mean soundness. 



Don't mistake style for strength. 



The sincere man is never self-conscious. 



If you are good enough, you are no good. 



If yon are doing no good yon are doing harm. 



He zvho laughs at distress is not to be trusted. 

* 
You can sell character but it cannot be bought. 



Never humor sin. It will get the better of you. 

Ne.rt to love, faith is the greatest thing in the world. 

Offer unsolicited advice and you often breed trouble. 

Meeting the hard things of life is ivhat makes us 
strong. 

Character is what zve are really worth as men and 
women. 

A bellows in the pulpit never started a tire in the 
church. 

Give to good zvorks or fate will give your riches to 
good and all. 

People zvho have nothing to do are often within 
reach of the devil. 

With sense in your head cents will be in your pocket 
to grow to dollars. 

An ounce of help is better than a pound of preach- 
ing to- a man in trouble. 

Wherever you go, and whatever you do, there will 
alzvays be somebody in the way. 

* 

It was Lincoln zufho said that the Lord loved the 
common people because he made so many of them. 



74 



the: ingleinook. 



NAVAL FLAGS. 



In a recent report of the commmandant of the 
Brooklyn navy yard to the navy department at Wash- 
ington he dwelt at length on the necessity of increasing 
his working forces in every branch of service under 
his supervision in order to enable him to keep pace 
with the large growth of the navy and promptly exe- 
cute the orders of the government, says the New York 
Tribune. Among other interesting matter the com- 
mandant gave a vivid description of Uncle Sam's flag 
shop at the Brooklyn yard — the place where the flags 
for the United States navy are born — and in this con- 
nection stated that there may be some i6o flags on a 
United States warship — say, twenty-five foreign flags 
(according to the station on which she will cruise), 
twenty i\merican ensigns, eleven pennants, four union 
jacks, twelve rear-admiral's flags (if a flagship), twen- 
ty international signals and the remainder signal and 
miscellaneous flags. Ensigns (stars and stripes, of 
course) run in eight sizes, from that used on vessels 
with very long spars, which is 19 feet on the hoist 
and 36 feet on the fly, to the little 2.37 by 4.50 foot 
boat flag, too small to sport more than the original 
thirteen States in its union. The No. i union jack 
is the 10.20 by 14.40 foot union of the No. i ensign, 
and the other jacks conform similarly to the unions of 
the corresponding ensig^is. 

When a captain puts his ship into commission he 
hoists, in addition to the ensign, a pennant. This has 
a fly of seventy feet, the union occupying 17.50 feet, 
with thirteen stars. The admiral's and vice-admiral's 
flags of the United States navy, when these ranks are 
filled, are blue, with four and three white stars, re- 
spectively. Our navy preserves the old English dis- 
tinction of the blue, the red and the white flag. The 
secretary of the navy flies a blue flag, with four white 
stars, an anchor and cable, the assistant secretary re- 
versing the colors. The president's flag is blue, with 
the arms of the United States, the eagle and stars 
white, the shield preserving the " tinctures." 

To make a flag for Uncle Sam's navy is an achieve- 
ment of no mean importance. It embodies the placing 
of a certain number of stitches to the inch, and it de- 
mands a vast amount of measuring and perfect uni- 
formity in every particular. There is a sewing bee 
at the Brooklyn yard, and Uncle Sam employs almost 
two dozen women all the year around, and in a large 
apartment, in which the air is surcharged with pa- 
triotism, the stars and stripes of the United States navy 
come into being. The work is done under the eagle 
eye of the foreman of the department, and once a week 
the commandant makes a tour of inspection and no 
imperfect stitch escapes detection. 

The women are paid by the yard for their labor on 
flags with plain seams, but on many of the alleged 
artistic creations for which other countries are re- 



sponsible the workers are paid according to time. Irt 
addition to the complement of United States flags 
supplied to every ship in our navy, there are also made 
the flags of. every country to which navigation ex- 
tends. Foreign flags are ambitious in design and 
variegated in hue. The smaller and more insignificant 
the nation, the more startling the flag. Uncle Sam's 
largest flag consumes just one week in manufacture. 
The bunting used in these flags comes from Lowell, 
Mass., and the supply is laid in twice a year. Each 
piece is subjected to the most severe test. It must 
weigh five pounds to every forty yards, and it must 
stand the weight test of seventy pounds to two square 
inches. 

It is steeped in salt water six hours and then ex- 
posed to the sun for six hours. If, after this course 
of treatment, it continues to be bunting of a distin- 
guishable color it is pronounced fit for service. The 
material then goes to the cutting room, where it is put 
on the counter and where the foreman of the flag shop 
cuts out the national ensigns. The red bunting is 
placed over the white bunting and six strips are cut 
at once with a pair of formidable, gigantic shears. 
He cuts eight different-sized ensign flags, varying in 
length from thirty-six to four and one-half feet. 

The makers of the United States flags, which are 
sewed in straight seams, usually take their work home. 
After the stripes are put together the flag must be 
brought to the cutting room, on the floor of which is 
a diagram for measurement, and it must be perfect in 
every particular. From hem to hem on all four sides 
it must correspond exactly with the nailheads placed 
in the floor. No apology for imperfection helps it to 
pass muster and if it is not correct to a thread it 
must be made over. The foreman carves the stars 
from bleached muslin with a mallet and chisel. Twen- 
ty yards of cotton cloth are folded and placed upon a 
block, a copper star laid on for a pattern and thirty 
stars are cut at one time. Three times cutting from 
the pattern and the constellations for one flag are ready 
for use. 

Probably no one in the United States is as familiar 
with the exact position occupied by the stellar repre- 
sentatives of the forty-five stars in the union as the 
feminine flagmakers. The star must be turned down 
on all of its sides to a size indicated by a pasteboard 
model. It must then be properly stationed, basted, 
hemmed down and then another one sewed on directly 
at its back. This is an achievement not as simple as 
it looks. When the flag is ready for binding it is 
passed on to another apartment, where a sailor puts 
on the canvas binding and makes it strong enough to 
defy the winds of heaven and the elements that may 
chance to tov with it on a three-year cruise, which is 
its estimated period of usefulness. 

Other interesting facts in connection with American 



THE INCBLEINOOK. 



75 



flag etiquette are that both national and regimental 
colors are used in the United States army by each 
regiment (except cavalry, which has only a regiment- 
al standard) and by the engineer batallion — the na- 
tional colors in various sizes. The garrison flag, the 
largest, is used only at important posts. It is twenty 
feet on the hoist, with a fly of thirty-six feet, the 
union being one-third the length of the fly and in 
depth to the lower edge of the fourth red stripe. The 
ordinary post flag is smaller and the storm flag small- 
er still. The regimental colors of the United States 
infantry are of blue silk, and bear in the center the 
arms of the United States. Below the eagle is a red 
scroll, with the number and name of the regiment in 
white. The United States artillery has scarlet regi- 
mental colors, with two cannons crossed in the center, 
with " U. S." in yellow above, and the regimental 
number below. The cavalry regimental standard is a 
seamless }'ellow silk, with a four-foot fly and three 
feet on the lance. The arms of the United States are 
in blue in the center, and beneath the eagle a red 
scroll bears the name and number of the regiment in 
yellow. The United States engineers carry scarlet 
•colors, bearing " Engineers " below, castle and letter- 
ing being in silver. Battles in which the regiments 
distinguished themselves were formerly listed on the 
colors and standards, but are now shown on the staffs. 
The national and regimental colors and standards are 
kept at the commanding officers' quarters, and are es- 
corted to the color company or troop amid much cere- 
mony, the escort being headed by the band. The color 
guard are selected for their soldierly appearance and 
qualities — men who would rather die than surrender. 
Next to their ovvn flag, that of Great Britain inter- 
ests the people of this country most. It is called the 
" union " flag because it is three flags in one. The 
flag of England is a red cross on a white field; that of 
Scotland, a white St. Andrew's cross on a blue field. 
Those flags were combined when England and Scot- 
land united in 1683, and on the union with Ireland, 
the Irish flag, a red St. Andrew's cross on a white 
field, was added. The union of the three countries is 
thus indicated on the " union." The St. George's cross 
of England remains as before, and is the central feat- 
ure of the flag, dividing it into four quarters occupied 
by the St. Andrew's crosses, the white of Scotland 
and the red of Ireland, which are placed side by side. 
Aboard a British warship the " union " is hoisted 
only when the king or an admiral is abroad. 

English ships sail under the British ensign, of which 
there are three kinds — ^white, blue and red, each with 
the union in a square in the upper part of the hoist — 
that portion of the flag along the staff. The navy 
and, by special permission, the Royal Yacht club sail 
■under the white ensign, which has, besides the union, 
the red cross of St. George over the whole. The blue 



ensign is a privilege allowed to those merchant ships 
which are officered by members of the naval reserve, 
and one-third of whose crews belong to the reserve. 
It is also flown by a few yacht clubs. The red is the 
merchantman's ensign. 

Until 1864 the British naval fleet was divided into 
three squadrons, each in command of an admiral, who 
is known by the color of his flag, as " the admiral of 
the blue," " the admiral of the red " and " the admiral 
of the white." This distinction was abolished, be- 
cause it was found puzzling in action and was often 
eliminated. Trafalgar, for instance, was fought un- 
der the white ensign. The French and Spanish ships 
went into action without setting their colors, but were 
later obliged to hoist them so that they could be able 
to strike them. The royal standard of Great Britain 
is personal to the sovereign, or for decoration on royal 
fete days. It is quartered, the first and fourth quar- 
ters being red, with three lions, and representing Eng- 




HAULING COTTON TO TOWN. 

land ; the second quarter yellow, with a red lion, for 
Scotland, and the third quarter blue, with a harp, 
for Ireland. 

In the navy a vessel never strikes her colors except 
to acknowledge defeat. For this reason when in that 
great sea duel between Paul Jones' Bonhomme Rich- 
ard and the English Serapis, which lasted far into 
the night, the ensign of the Bonhomme Richard was 
shot away from the halyards, Lieut. Stafford plunged 
into the sea after it and braving a double death saved 
it and set it again and it was the Serapis which finally 
struck her colors. 

When Napoleon's army had to retreat from Moscow 

there were but few French " colors " among the spoils 

gathered by the Russians. When the French color 

guards saw that they could not carry Napoleon eagles 

to victory they tore the colors from the staffs, made 

a fire with the latter, burned the colors, mixed the 

ashes with the water of melted snow, drank them and 

lay down to die. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

For may part, I should try to secure some part of 
every day for meditation, above all in the early morn- 
ing and the open air; but how that time was to be 
improved I should leave to circumstance and the in- 
spiration of the hour. — R. L. Stevenson. 



the: ingl.e:nook. 



GROWING ENGLISH WALNUTS. 



Every member of the Nook family knows what an 
English walnut is, though few of them know how they 
are grown unless they happen to live in California. 
It may not be generally known that English walnuts 
will grow almost anywhere that the Nook is read. 
They are a thing that grows very easily. They may be 
started in a pot in the window by simply purchasing a 
few nuts and planting them underground where they 
will readily sprout and develop until springtime comes 
when they may be planted out. In some parts of tiie 
country where they are sheltered, as in towns as far 
north as central Pennsylvania, they may continue to 
grow and produce a few nuts, but not worth while. 
In most instances they will freeze back and pick up 
again, but still will give any Nooker who makes the 
experiment an idea of what the walnut tree is like. 

Where they are grown in California they are grafted 
to insure a pure variety and the trees are planted about 
fifty feet apart each way, and are kept trimmed for 
about five feet above the ground. The cultivation of 
a grove of walnut trees is a very hardy and long- 
lived proposition. Fabulous stories have been told 
about trees several hundred years old in Spain, but it 
is believed in this country, at least, that they are best 
when they are twenty-five or thirty years old. They 
begin to bear in a small way when they are six or 
seven years old. As a crop about fifteen hundred 
pounds to the acre is a common average yield, making 
about seventy-five pounds to a tree. A walnut grove 
in bearing, where it is well kept, is a beautiful sight, 
and might be mistaken by those who do not know 
the facts for an orchard of unusually large apple trees. 

Harvest time begins about the middle of September, 
and lasts about six weeks. The nuts begin to fall with 
the leaves and are picked up by boys and girls, men 
and women, Japanese and Chinese. In some districts 
the public schools close regularly for a walnut vaca- 
tion, the children going out and gathering walnuts. 
A grown person may earn from $1.50 to $2.00 a day. 
The average price paid is five cents a pound for pick- 
ing and even children can make good wages. 

After they are picked the nuts are graded by means 
of a wire mesh kept in motion by an engine. The 
small ones drop through the sieve and the large ones 
drop through to a dummy car just below, and from 
there to another. 

The natural color of the walnut is a dark brown, 
but the public calls for a whitened nut and so they are 
all dipped in a bath calculated to whiten them, though 
sometimes they are bleached by means of sulphur 
fumes. They are then sacked in quantities ranging 
from no to 115 pounds. In the house where the 
operation is going on there is so much din and noise 
that one must shout at the top of his voice to make 



himself heard. The total output of English walnuts 
from southern California was 825 carloads for last 
year. 

* * ♦ 

CAB FARES IN MEXICO. 



Cabs in Mexico city are only a trifle more expensive 
than in Paris. The charge in one " course " in 
Paris is one franc and a half, or thirty cents, and 
the charge for one " viaje " in Mexico City is three 
reals, or thirty-seven and one-half cents. 

The cabs are drawn by shaggy little ponies 
which are driven at breakneck speed, and are for- 
ever racing to the curbs of the broad " paseo " 
at the imminent risk of disaster. The one that 
arrives first gets the passenger. 

There are three grades of cabs in Mexico City, 
which are known as the red, or "Colorado:" the 
blue, or " azul," and the yellow, or " amarillo." 
The latter must be avoided like the plague, which 
their color seems to typify. They are used to car- 
ry the lowest kind of peons, profligates and crim- 
inals, and more often than not are carrying a load 
of passengers who do not pay any fares, but who 
transfer their affections to any uninfested neophyte 
who happens to have the misfortune to enter the 
cab. The blue cabs are acceptable when a red 
cab is not to be had, but the red cabs are the 
best. 

The three grades are distinguished by little tin 
flags of the corresponding color, which are in 
plain view up by the seat of the driver. There 
is a joint in the stick which supports the flag, 
and when the cab has a fare the flag is bent down. 

The cab fares are regulated by law, and a slip 
of paper must be pasted inside each cab opposite 
the seat to inform passengers of the rates, but 
the cabby always expects a slight " propina." For 
a three-real trip he generally secures half a dollar 
from a foreigner. The climate is so even and so 
beautiful and invigorating that more than half the 
vehicles are open victorias, but the rates for them 
are the same. 

There is just one point upon which the uniniti- 
ated is likely to trip. There are scores of " fiestas," 
holidays, on the Mexican calendar, and on a " fies- 
ta " day the usual rate is almost dou))led. 

The drivers are unexceptionally dense, and it 
one makes the slightest mistake in pronunciation 
they throw up their hands in despair, and resort 
to the universal Alexican fatalistic expression: 
" Quien sabe?" The only equivalent in English 
which would indicate the same amount of indif- 
ference and despair is, " God knows." 

Of course the cabbies all try to cheat the " tour- 
ista," but an appeal to a gendarme will quickly 
bring the cabby to his senses. The gendarme in 



THI 



ingl_e:nook. 



77 



^[exico City is armed with a revolver hanging in 
a holster on the left side, and he has no com- 
punction about bringing a cabby to time with a 
flourish of that weapon. 

♦ ♦ *L 

POPE LEO WAS CAREFUL IN MATTERS OF 
MONEY. 



Carefulness in money matters was a family trait 
with the late Pope Leo, but Zola's accusation of 
avarice is not borne out by the facts. To his friends, 
the valet Centra for instance, he was even gen- 
erous. After the jubilee year he gave him all the 
wines sent to the Vatican by people all over the 
world. Their sale allowed Centra to acquire quite 
a deal of landed property. 

Imposture, or anything smacking of it, he hated. 
On ascending the throne of St. Peter's he pre- 
sented the Swiss guards with 50 francs a head, 
just half of what they expected to receive. Hence, 
much indignation among the lazy troopers. Some 
■of them broke their arms and tore their uniforms, 
whereupon Leo sent word that he would call in 
the police — the Italian police — if they did not be- 
have. 

Walking in the Vatican gardens shortly after 
the beginning of his pontificate Leo observed that 
the pomegranate and citron trees were bereft of 
fruit. 

" Who harvested them without asking my 
leave?" he asked the officiating secretary, who 
replied that it was customary to divide the fruit 
of the Vatican gardens not used in the palace 
among the cardinals and prelates. 

Next day the Pope issued an order that the 
products of the gardens should be sold, the amounts 
lo be paid into the treasury. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
CUNNING OF THE 'POSSUM. 



and from a dozen feet away takes a flying leap, catch- 
ing the rough trunk up just out of reach of the keen- 
nosed dogs. He goes on up a little and leaps again, 
touching the ground ten feet out, thus leaving a blank 
of twenty or more feet in his trail. 

The stream or fence has puzzled the dogs, but now 
at the tree they begin to worry. They circle and fi- 
nally pick up the scent beyond the first gap, only to 
run instantly into a greater blank, one that the widest 
circling does not cross. For the coon has taken to an- 
other tree, out on the limbs of this to still another, and 
on like a squirrel, from tree to tree for perhaps a 
hundred yards, on, it may be, to his own high hol- 
low. 

■"i* "^ ■^ 

A VERY HOT TUNNEL. 



He will usually go home by a tree-trunk road. 
Through the open country on the boundartes of his 
range he trots along without minding his steps. The 
dogs may have all the fun here with his trail that 
they can. He intends only that they shall not find his 
home tree, nor even the vicinity of it. 

So, as he enters his own neighborhood swamp, his 
movements change. The dogs may be hard after him 
or not. If they are not close behind he knows by long 
experience that they may be expected and never so 
far forgets his precious skin as to go straight to his 
nest-tree. 

Instead he trots along a boundary fence or in the 
stream, leaping the crossing logs and coming out, like- 
Iv, on the bank opposite his home tree. Farther down 
he jumps the stream, runs hard toward a big gum 



The engineers digging the wonderful tunnel that 
runs through the great Simplon Mountain to connect 
Switzerland with Italy, are experiencing great diffi- 
culties because of the presence of boiling water in the 
mountain. The water comes from the top of the 
mountain, and is heated almost to boiling point by the 
friction and pressure of its percolation through the 
limestone beds of the mountain. 

Before the tunnel had been dug very far on the 
Italian side the heat became so intense that it was im- 
possible to live in it. The mountain was piped, and 
soon fifteen thousand gallons of steaming hot water 
were flowing out of the south end of the tunnel every 
minute of the day and night. The immense flow was 
harnessed and made to drive refrigerating plants and 
cold air blowers. 

To-day the temperature of the tunnel has been re- 
duced from a height that would have roasted a man 
in a minute or two, and the atmosphere now has the 
pleasant warmth of a June day. The hot water also 
drives pneumatic drills and boring machines, so that 
it helps to dig the tunnel as vi^ell. When completed, 
the Simplon tunnel will be the biggest in the world — 
fourteen miles long, with a cost of nearly one million 
dollars a mile. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

The Sakais, or tree dwellers, of the Malay penin- 
sula build their houses in forked trees a dozen feet 
above ground and reach them by means of bamboo 
ladders, which they draw up when safely housed out 
of harm's way. The house itself is a rude kind of 
shack, made of bamboo, and the flooring is lashed to- 
gether piece by piece and bound securely to the tree 
limbs by rattan. 

These curious people are rather small and lighter 
in complexion than the Malays, though much uglier. 
They have no form of religion at all — not even idols — 
no written language and speak a corrupt form of Ma- 
lav. 



the: inguenook. 



f » ■ ; ■ i . . { , .1. . 1 . ■!. j. .M-H.^.^.^ ^ . .t ■ ; ■ ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ - t . . ! ■ ■!■ ■ ; ■ ■ ! • ■ ! ■ • 



"i>»»»»»4"i-»M' - t > ! ■ ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ • ! • - V > t - ■ ! ■ ' t - V ■ » ■ ■ ! ■ ■ ! ■ » • ! • • ! • ' V - V ' V - V • ! • • ! • - V - l » -t •!■ > I - » • ! ■ » • ! • » » » » » ! ■ < • » 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
^ over the country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



THE TWO KINDS OF SPORT. 



BY CALLA HARCOURT. 



" 'Tis a beautiful morning," a sportsman said; 

■' The world looks so happy let's each take a gun. 
Go out and kill something for pastime and fun. 

And proudest be him who counts the most dead." 

They blotted out lives that were happy and good; 

Blinded eyes, and broke wings that delighted to soar. 

They killed for mere pleasure and crippled and tore. 
Regardless of aught but the hunger for blood. 

" 'Tis a beautiful morning." a sportsman cried 

Who carried a kodak instead of a gun; 

" The world looks so happy, so golden the sun. 
I'll slip to the woods where the wild things hide." 

The deer that he " shot " never dreamed of his aim, 
The bird that he " caught " went on with her song. 
Peace followed his footsteps, not slaughter and wrong. 

Yet rich were his " trophies " and varied his " game." 

— Good Health. 
•^ ^ ^I"^ 

A LIVE CLUB. 



There lies before us a clipping from a Pennsylvania 
paper giving an account of a meeting of an Inglenook 
Nature Study Club where the coon was discussed. 
The accomplished teacher, Mr. A. H. Brubaker, sends 
the following program. It shows what a live teacher 
with a lot of smart boys and girls can do when they 
try: 

Pleasant Hill. 

The Inglenook Nature Study Club met yesterday and 
had a fine program. The subject was the Raccoon, dis 
cussed as follows: Where the Coon is Found — Paul Hoflf- 
man; Scientific Name, and Meaning — Wayne Miller; 
Feet — Walter Batdorf; When Coons Are Out — Robert 
Weiman; Where Coons Live — Robert H. Greeley; What 
is a Good Sign to Tell Where Coons Are — Fanny A. Gil- 
bert; Coons with Red Mouth and Paws — Rosanna Gil- 
bert; Time to Hunt Coons — J. M. Roebuck; Dogs as Coon 
Hunters, How Trained — John Spangler; The Coon on a 
■Tree — Harry Weiman; Coon on a Large Tree — John 
Lear; Coon as a Fighter — ^Jas. Fies; Coons and Persim- 
mons — Eliza Roebuck; Coons Used for Food — Mabel Mil- 
ler; Is the Coon Harmful? — Ben Gloss; Coon as a Pet — 
Virgie M. Lengle; Coon and Bear — William Vincent; 
Fur of the Coon — Walter Speicher; What the Coon Eats 
— Elmer Douple; What Taste Pleases the Coon — C. H. 
Simmers; How the Coon Eats — Roy Weiman; The Coon's 
Claws, Use of Them — Veronica Fox; The Boys as Coon 
Hunters — Wm. J. Dearwechter; What Coons do when 



Dogs Get after Them — Helen Smith; Boys Finding a 
Coon on a Small Tree — Mabel E. Greeley; The Coon in 
the North and South — William H. Roebuck; Trick of 
Tame Coons — Gertie Smith; Skins of Coons — Calvin Ra- 
ber; The Flesh of Coons — Lilly E. Gilbert. 

From the above it can be seen that the subject was 
exhaustively treated. The Nook congratulates thi& 
school and hopes that others may follow its example. 
We suggest dividing the session into sections ; animals^ 
insects, birds, reptiles, etc., and assigning questions to. 
each one, taken from the Nook articles. These should 
be answered before the class and additional informa- 
tion elicited. In case a hard and unanswerable 
question comes up, refer it for answer to the whole 
club through the Nook. Coming down to bottom 
facts it is the intelligence of the teacher that makes the 
club worth while. Clearly Mr. A. H. Brubaker is. 
that kind of an instructor. 

•> ♦£• *> 

THE NIGHTHAWK. 



The nighthawk is found in northern and eastern 
North i\merica, east of the plains and south to tropic 
-\merica as far as Buenos .\yres in South America. It 
is a common summer resident everywhere in the East. 
Its note is a short, sharp click. This bird will be at 
once located in the minds of the Nature Study class 
when we remember that it is the one that sails around 
far overhead in the evening and plunges downward, 
making a noise like blowing into a bunghole of an 
empty hogshead, only to sail forward again to repeat 
the process. This is done during the breeding sea- 
son and may have some relation to the song or what 
would be song in other birds. 

The scientific name is Chordciles I'irgiiiianus, and 
it must not be confused with the whip-poor-will, which 
is an entirely different bird, knowii as the Antrostoiniis 
vociferous. 

The breeding place of the nighthawk is always on 
the ground and never in the woods or thickets. They 
have been known, however, to deposit their eggs on 
the roofs of tall office buildings in the city, as they 
are not at all averse to city life. In their flight they 
are picking up insects on the wing. In fact, the night- 
hawk is to be found quite as much in the crowded 
cities or over them as in the country. 

The bird lavs two eggs on the bare ground or on 



the: ingleinook. 



79 



-a. rocky place. If slie is much disturbed during the 
nesting period she will take the eggs in her mouth 
and remove them to a distance. A peculiarity of the 
nighthawk is that when it perches upon a limb or on 
the fence it is- always lengthwise and never across 
as other birds sit. There is no known reason why 
this is true. 

The nighthawk may be known from the whip-poor- 
■will when on the wing by the white spot on the feath- 
ers of the wing. It looks, when viewed from under- 
neath, as though there were a hole through the wing. 
In the latter part of the summer these birds collect 
in large bands and proceed slowly to winter quarters, 
from Mexico through to South America. 

Although the nighthawk would appear to be a 
■" hawk " yet it is nothing of the kind. Its food con- 
sists entirely of insects and never of anything else. 
AVhen flying over the water it occasionally dips down 
and touches the surface as swallows do, but whether for 
the purpose of taking a drink or not we are not able 
to say. It is a very common bird and exists in vast 
numbers throughout the country and is known perhaps 
to every Nooker. , . , 

THE SWALLOW. 



There are a number of different swallows, closely 
related but still different, to be found over the eastern 
part of the United States. They are found all over 
the whole country as far south as the extreme south- 
em end of South America. 

They feed exclusively on insects, and consume myr- 
iads of flies around the place that vex and annoy the 
housewife. They differ from other birds in the fact 
that they are remarkably social in their relations to 
one another. When the}' migrate they go in flocks, 
sometimes numbering thousands, and they nest to- 
gether in large companies. 

They are high flyers and may be seen, flying away 
up in the air, almost out of sight, in an erratic way 
and they are doubtless catching insects that have 
sought the upper world, perhaps as a means of safe- 
ty for themselves. Some of them build in the barn, 
some under the eaves, some in chimneys, and others 
dig holes for themselves in the sandy banks of the 
stream, but it will be seen that each of these specimens 
belongs to the same family.. 

The usual number of eggs is five, sometimes six. 
The martin, which builds in boxes provided for that 
purpose, belongs to the swallow family, and taken 
altogether the swallow is one of our commonest birds. 
He has no regular song, but only a twitter that an- 
swers the purpose of a song in other birds. Swallows 
are sociable, and their lack of fear of man renders 
them exceptionally pleasant little feathered folks to 
have around, and, instead of destroying their nests 
which thoughtless people sometimes do, they should 



be encouraged, for, being entirely insectivorous, they 
destroy many times their weight in insects. 

The migration of the swallows has always been a 
secret. They are found around Elgin during the 
summer and when autumn comes they are away. 
They are reported to have cleared out of the United 
States entirely, and are not found in Mexico in any 
number, and as far south as Guatemala, they are 
still reported as going beyond that, and the winter 
home of the swallow is not clearly accounted for. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE HORNED TOAD IN TEXAS. 



BY MINNIE ZIRKLE. 



In a recent Inglenook there was an article stating 
that the horned toad does not live anywhere but in the 
desert. I think this is a mistake, for they are plentiful 
here in west Texas. The young ones, no larger than 
a dime, are most interesting little creatures. They 
make nice pets. My brother kept one nearly all sum- 
mer, and it could have gone away at any time as it 
was not confined. It would always run to meet him 
at any time it saw him and had no objection to being 
picked up and carried about by him. It paid no at- 
tention to the rest of us, and always ran away when 
we tried to catch it. Our cat finally got it. 

The horned toads disappear early in the fall and do 
not reappear until spring. They will eat red ants as 
fast as they can lick them up. When they get mad 
they stand on all their legs and seem as though they 
were an inch higher, and their bodies swell until it 
looks as though they would burst. They never get 
angry unless teased. When they want to hide they 
flatten themselves out and look as though they had 
been mashed, and you can hardly see them, for they 
are nearly the color of the ground. 

San Angela, Texas. 

COMMENT. 

The above interesting article on the horned toad, 
which, by the way, is not a toad at all, is presented 
here as an example of what we would like to have in 
regard to animals everywhere. The so-called horned 
toad is really a lizard, and does not have horns in the 
ordinary acceptation of the term. Will some other 
person who lives where the horned toads are found be 
kind enough to add their knowledge to the above? 

*J* 4» ^ 

The larvae of insects are the most voracious eaters. 
Their entire work seems to be to eat and grow. This 
rapid growth is shown in the larvae of the honey bee, 
which increases from the egg to full-grown in less 
than five days, increasing about fifteen hundred times 
its weight. 



8o 



the: inglenook. 



SPIDER ENTRAPS SMALL BIRD. 



"'Will you walk into my parlor?' 
Said the spicier to the fly." 

This time it was not the fly that the wily spider 
sought to entangle in his meshes, but a small bird, 
against which he felt he had just cause for grievance. 

It seems that during the past season the Field mu- 
seum has been infested with large quantities of ob- 
noxious spiders. They have festooned the ceiling and 
great columns of the building with yards of their 
shuttlework, much to the annoyance of the authorities. 
Scrubwomen and janitors have tried in vain to re- 
lieve the building of the pests and their work. Even 
the slight suggestions of frost did not seem to greatly 
diminish the insects. Finally a wee brown creeper, 
discovering the state of things there, decided to take 
up his abode inside and assist the authorities in rid- 
ding the building of the pests. For several days he 
flitted about very much as he pleased, confining him- 
self mainly to the rear-entrance room, wagging up and 
down column after column and probing his long bill 
into every crevice. With his murderous vigilance he 
actually carried on a very effective work there. He 
seemed a permanent fixture and the authorities and the 
public eyed him amusedly. 

The other morning, however, as a curator of one of 
the departments was passing, a guard remarked : 

" There's a bird for your collection ! Looks as if it 
was done for." 

The bird lay panting on its side at the bottom of 
one of the columns. 

" Bring a fly," said the scientist, as he took the 
little creeper in his hands. 

The guard held a buzzing fly on the point of a long 
pin to the bird's beak and, to his surprise, saw it bit 
at voraciously. 

'■ Doesn't look as if he were going to die," said the 
scientist. " I wonder what's the matter with him, any- 
way?" 

Turning the bird over in his hand he found it had 
been entrapped in a large spider's web. which had 
bound the wing and tail together in such a manner as 
to preclude flying. It looked as if some wise old spi- 
der had resented the bird's work of extermination and 
had purposely ensnared him in a trap. • 

The queer bandage was removed and the bird darted 
out over the iron grating and shot out of sight across 
the lagoon. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

INSECTS OF OTHER LANDS. 



while the German carp has driven from our streams 
most of the fine food fishes with which they once 
abounded. 

It is now proposed to import a certain breed of in- 
sects which, it is claimed, will rid the orchards of dis- 
eases that are imperiling the bearing capacity of the 
trees. This insect, though called the Chinese lady- 
bird, is nothing but an insect. It is said to be the 
natural enemy of the dreaded San Jose scale. Its dis- 
covery in its native habitat near the great wall of China 
was one of the most valuable finds credited to the agri- 
cultural department. It is multiplying at a very satis- 
factory rate. Colonies were sent out to six States 
during the last year with encouraging success. A col- 
ony liberated in a Georgia peach orchard of 17,000 
trees now numbers 30,000 or 40,000 insects, and with 
the additional broods expected before the end of the 
season will be numerically strong enough to prac- 
tically exterminate the scale. As this orchard adjoins 
another of 250,000 trees, similarly infested, the spread 
of the beetle will be anxiously awaited. 

Equally promising are the reports of the results of 
the importation from Italy and Africa of an insect 
enemy of the black scale which threatened the destruc- 
tion of California's famous orchards. The insect is 
now established in every county south of Point Con- 
ception, and yet the commissioner of horticulture at 
San Francisco, who has been distributing the colonies, 
cannot keep pace with the demand. The Los Angeles 
commissioners distributed over 400 strong colonies 
at Escondido. At Pasadena the insects, according to 
the commissioner of agriculture, have spread naturally, 
and, what is vitally important, have destroved " over 
90 per cent of the black scale." 

The other important insect importation made by the 
division, namely, the insect that is essential for the 
fertilization of figs and the production of the numer- 
ous seeds .so characteristic of the Mediterranean fruity 
has become thoroughly acclimatized at Fresno and at 
Niles, Cal. The fig crop raised at the former place 
during the last year was large and of very superior 
quality. Now that the secret of fig-growing has been 
traced to the agency of an insect and the latter has 
Iiecome thoroughly established, new fig orchards are 
springing up in many parts of California. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
SENSES OF REPTILES. 



The American public naturally looks with suspicion 
upon the importation of foreign living products. The 
English sparrow, first brought here about thirty years 
ago, has driven awav nearlv all our native song birds. 



Professor Werner, of Vienna, a naturalist of note,, 
has reported the results of observations he has been 
making for some time on the senses of inferior verte- 
brates, and he has reached some curious and surpris- 
ing conclusions. 

The professor took all possible precautions not to 
let the creatures know that they were watched. One 
general fact is very evident, that reptiles and amphib- 



the: ingleinook. 



8i 



ians are strongly attracted by water. They go 
straight toward it, even when they are at distances so 
great that they could not divine its presence by any of 
the senses known to us. It seems really that a sense 
of which we have, no knowledge informs them of the 
direction in which water may be found. There seems 
to be a sort of chemical attraction, says M. Werner. 
But how does this act, and on what part of the crea- 
ture? This remains a mystery. Reptiles also seek 
the light, but independently of heat. They often leave 
comfortable and warm retreats to seek the sunlight. 
Sight is generally good with them. It is probably the 
finest sense that they possess, but it would still ap- 
pear to be very limited. The caymans and the croco- 
diles cannot distinguish a man at a distance of more 
than six times their length, according to Werner. In 
the water fishes see only at very close range — about 
half their own length. This will seem perhaps un- 
likely to anglers, although some of them can cite in- 
stances showing that fish cannot see far. Snakes seem 
to have a very mediocre sense of sight. The boa, for 
example, does not see at more than a quarter or a 
third of its own length. Different species are limited 
to one-fifth or one-eighth of their length. Frogs are 
better off. They see at fifteen or twenty times their 
length. Frog catchers know this from experience. 
Hearing is much poorer than sight, if possible. Most 
reptiles are noticeably deaf, except caymans and croc- 
odiles. The boa appears to be absolutley so. 
»jt <♦ ♦{. 
THE HARVEST OF GUM. 



Over 15,000 pounds of spruce gum have been har- 
vested this year in Maine. The gum-picker wears 
steel climbing spurs on his boots, and in his belt he 
carries a light hatchet, while strapped to his waist is a 
bag with a wide mouth for the reception of the gum. 
Climbing a tree the picker proceeds from limb to limb, 
clipping off the lumps of gum as he finds them, until 
he reaches the top. Most of the gum is caught in the 
wide-open bag as it falls from the tree, while all that 
goes to the ground stands out in such relief upon 
the snow that it is easily picked up. Having picked 
all the gum on the tree, the picker hacks and scars the 
bark so that the tree may produce another crop. 
^ ♦ ♦ 
HOW YOU ARE PIPED. 



As you read this your heart is going thumpety- 
thump and at each beat about a tumbler full of blood 
is forced into the great artery which branches out into 
smaller tubes. Once it is forced into the artery it can- 
not get back because the aortic valve keeps it out. 
Now each artery has three coats, and the whole three 
make a very elastic tube. One of these coats is in fact 
a succession of tiny ringed muscles that give a squeeze 



as the pulsating blood expands them, like hundreds of 
tiny hand-clasps on a rubber tube, each forcing the 
current along. In old age these walls become hard- 
ened and eventually this kills without fail. 

The tubing that gets the blood back, or the veins, is 
not so thick and not so contractible as the blood re- 
turns in a steady stream. There are two coats to the 
veins and the blood cannot regurgitate or flow back- 
ward. In children the blood flows rapidly and force- 
fully. In the old it is sluggish. The reason lies in 
the hardening of the arterial coats and while the time 
varies in different people, it is that that causes 
the natural death of " old age." 
4> 4. 4. 
PREHISTORIC ANIMALS. 



A WRITER to the Nook asks whether or not there 
might be some prehistoric animals, such as are us- 
ually regarded as prehistoric, to be found in remote 
quarters of the earth. It is entirely possible that, in a 
place like Patagonia, where there has not been a great 
deal of change -in the past thousand years, there might 
still remain roaming at large, some animals that are 
thought to be extinct. Mammoths may be found in the 
interior of Alaska, for all anybody knows to the con- 
trary, while some other monsters may be in existence. 
It would seem, from what has been witnessed by navi- 
gators, that some of them do come to the surface of 
the oceari and remain in sight long enough to be iden- 
tified as ,being out of the usual. So the chances are 
that the world's strange animals are not all extinct. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The length of time which insects remain as larvae 
is wonderfully varied. The maggot revels in decaying 
meat for two or three days ; the bee is in the larvae 
stage for nearly a week, the appletree borer, for three 
years, while the locust, or at least one kind of them, 
mentioned hitherto, in the Inglenook, gropes in dark- 
ness, living on the sap of roots for more than six- 
teen years. 

♦ 4* ♦ 

The skin of insects is relatively hard and unyield- 
ing and does not grow like the skin of a human being. 
It therefore requires a recasting and changing. Shed- 
ding the skin is called moulting. Most of the insects 
moult from four to six times. 
4> ♦ ♦ 

The experts, say that the cat fish is easily tamed, 
and can be trained like pigs. When it is recalled that 
there are several troops of educated pigs going about 
the country this is no small compliment. 
^ ♦ ■»> 

A queen bee may lay double her usual number of 
eggs when she is fed on highly nutritious food. 



82 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



^iiCl-emook: 

A. ^A^eekily IVIagrazine 



..PUBLISHED BY... 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, L L 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglknook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents arc wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, cither for a year or part of a year. Address, 



Brethren Publishing House, 



(For the Inglenook.) 



22-24 South Stmte St., ELGIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, III., as Sacond-class Matter. 

I will not doubt though all my ships at sea 

Come drifting home with broken masts and sails; 
I shall believe the Hand that never fails 
From seeming evil worketh good for me. 
And though I weep because the sails are tattered, 
Still will I cry, while my best hopes lie shattered. 
I trust in thee! " 

— Selected. 
♦ 4> * 

LESSONS OF THE CHICAGO FIRE. 



The recent holocaust in Chicago, in which the great- 
er pai't of a thotisand people were either killed, crip- 
pled or injured in some way, carries with it a num- 
ber of lessons which it wotild be well to remember. 
One of these is that it does not seem possible to make 
a building that is fireproof. It is doubtful whether 
there ever was any structure made by man that would 
not burn up if the flames got a chance at it. 

To illustrate this, some years ago a steel suspension 
bridge at Pittsburg burned down and fell into the 
river. It was set on fire by a gas jet vmderneath. 
The owners did not think it possible to be destroyed 
by fire and thought it folly to insure it. Neverthe- 
less it burned and fell into the river, and so the idea 
of a fireproof building must be taken with a good 
many grains of salt. 

Another lesson is, that out of the hundreds who were 
killed not one needed to have lost his life, or to have 
suflfered in any way. The audience went mad in a 
dense mob that tried to get out of the burning build- 
ing, and the injury was all done among themselves. 
If any Inglenook reader should ever find himself in 
a similar situation, the best thing to do is to hold still 



and watch his chances of getting out. There wtre 
people here in Elgin who were present at the time of 
the disaster, and instead of swarming in front of the 
entrance where they came in, which was piled up with 
the dead to the top of the door, simply walked out of a 
side door into the open air. 

While it is bad enough and the Inglenook does not 
want to lay blame on the dead for their mistakes, yet 
it is just as well for those who are alive to remember 
in the case of a fire, while a reasonable hurry is ad- 
visable, it is best for everyone to pnll himself togeth- 
er before he starts and act with intelligence and not 
lose his head. That whole houseful of people could 
have been emptied in two or three minutes and every- 
one have passed out as orderly as done at church and 
with as little danger, but it seems that in the case of 
a disaster everybody's senses deserted him and he be- 
came a wild animal. 

One man, making the break for liberty, caught the 
hair of a child before him, and in order to get him 
out of the way, scalped him. The doorway and stairs 
were blocked with the dead and wounded, and oth- 
ers behind could not get out and so perished miser- 
ably. The great moral is to keep your senses about 
you and not get into the mob of people, who are just 
as so many animals, once they have lost their reason, 
in a mad desire to get away. All this is easy enough 
to talk about here but difficult to practice at the su- 
preme moment, still it can be done and the writer 
knows it from personal experience. 

4. ^ .{. 
GETTING OLD. 



This thing of getting old is only a relative mat- 
ter. Some people are born old and a bad thing it is for 
them. Some grow old, gracefully or otherwise, and 
others never get old. It depends on what the party 
himself thinks about it. Nobody is any older than 
he thinks he is, provided he is not in the senile stage. 

Most people dread getting old and the folly of it is 
apparent on a moment's thought, for the years will 
come along with their gray hairs and that tired feel- 
ing, whether we will or not. As far as the calendar 
goes we all get there in the cotirse of time. But years 
do not make gray hearts. 

It is entirely possible for those who would be young 
to continue so as long as they live, no matter what 
one's years may be. One of the first things to bear 
in mind if this end is sought, is never to think of ag- 
ing. Anyone comes to look like, and to be, more or 
less, what he thinks he is. If he is going down a vale 
of tears, he looks it, and if he is down in the meadow 
flecked with dandelions, he has no years to speak of. 
.\ good starter on the road to perpetual youth is to 
let up telling your woes to others. A man may actual- 
ly have a misery in his back but that kind of a mis- 



I 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



83 



ery is never cured by talking of it to every listener. 
Be thankful that there is not a second or a third mis- 
ery hiding in your anatomy and let it go at that. 

Reference is had to manly and womanly youth, and 
not to the frightful examples we sometimes see of an 
old woman frizzed and powdered and painted, or a 
fool man with over-tight shoes, a carnation and a 
lorgnette. What we mean by keeping young is not 
going to our own funerals years before we die. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
AFTER IT IS OVER. 



There is a proverb about locking the stable door 
after the horse is stolen, and it is verified in the case 
of the Chicago theater fire. Nothing ever happened 
in that city that so worked up the people as the 
Iroquois theater destruction of life. Ever since it hap- 
pened the press has been full of suggestion, crimina- 
tion and recrimination, but it would appear that al- 
most every public place of amusement in the city was 
an intentional trap, of some kind, that sooner or later 
would destroy life. 

The extent and character of the suggestions to pre- 
vent a repetition of the disaster are instructive. They 
all point to the necessity of anticipating, in all ways, 
the possibility of danger. The laws are rigid, or if 
not so can readily be made so, and the proper thing 
to do is to see that they are enforced in a way that 
leaves no doubt about it. There is too often a mani- 
festation of greed on the part of the owners of such 
places, backed by connivance on the part of the au- 
thorities, and when the accident happens it is a bad 
one. 

The thing to do with the stable is to keep it 
locked all the time when the horse is there if, indeed, 
it does any good to lock it at all. It is altogether like- 
ly that the public places of amusement in Chicago will 
be made safe in the future. What reference is had to 
amusements should apply with equal force to every 
public place of meeting everywhere. 
.J. 4. ♦♦. 
IN CASE OF A FIRE. 



A GREAT many people are justly afraid of a fire. 
It is one thing and about the only thing that will 
scare the Nookman. He has been in several fires and 
is afraid of them, and has the following suggestion to 
make to people who do not want to be roasted alive 
in their own rooms. It is a simple remedy and is 
applicable only in private homes. It is this : Leave 
your doors open. 

Of course by this we do not mean that the outside 
doors and windows should be left open. These should 
be locked as a matter of protection from thieves. But 
if there is a kitchen or a room stove from which the fire 
may originate, and the people are in bed in their sev- 



eral rooms with the doors shut, the fire may get a 
start that will burn the house down, and even bum up 
the people that are in it as it has often done. 

However if the doors of the rooms are left open the 
first small fire that will make smoke will cause it to 
ascend through the house as it naturally does, and is 
a hundredfold more likely to awaken the inmates of 
the rooms in time than if the doors were closed and 
each sleeping occupant took his chances of what is 
going on on the first floor. Many a home would have 
been saved from the ravage of a fire and many a 
life, if this precaution had been taken. With open 
doors the unforeseen danger below will soonest make it- 
self known to the sleepers. 

^ *J* *?* 

RAILROAD ACCIDENTS. 



Every now and then the public is horrified on read- 
ing of a terrible accident in which many are killed and 
crippled. At once the public begins belaboring the 
railroad people for negligence, parsimony, or what not. 
Now the actual facts are that accidents will happen as 
long as people manage railroads. It is because the 
element of the lapse of memory must ever be a factor 
to be considered, and it can never be eliminated from 
the question. Men must be relied upon to do cer- 
tain things to insure safety and as long as men forget 
they will occasionally omit doing them and then the 
wreck. One other element must be considered and 
that is one man's dependence upon another to do a 
thing. Smith thinks Brown closed the switch, and 
Brown believes Smith did it. Neither did, and the 
express goes into the freight. The two are discharged 
as they ought to be, but that does not bring the dead 
engineer back to life again. And so it comes about 
and so there will be accidents as long as people for- 
get. 

4. ^. »j. 

The articles for the Women's number of the Nook 

are coming in thick and fast. They are of unusual 

merit, and it is hoped that there will be more of them. 

We would like an italic sentence from each of our 

interested sister Nookers, signed, reference being had 

to the sentences under the caption " Just a Thought or 

So." If you know an expressive sentence send it in on 

a postal card, with your name to it, not necessarily 

as its author, but as your idea of a pert truth. We can 

use it. 

4t 4. ^ 

About the first of February we will begin the ar- 
ticles on letter-writing. After reading the whole 
course over, the Editor of the Inglenook feels con- 
strained to say that it is a pretty good thing; in fact, 
a very good thing, and that those who follow it can- 
not fail to be helped in their correspondence. 



84 



THE INOLEINOOK. 



WHAT'S THE NEWS? 



Colombia, it is said, is ready to attack Panama, and 
United States war ships will make a demonstration. 



Wheeling, W. Va., has had a $2(X),ooo fire. 



It is said that the pope has a keen sense of humor. 



A fourteen-year-old boy in Montana got hold of a 
live wire and received 2,200 volts. He dropped dead. 



King Edward is being treated for a throat trouble. 



There were three pair of twins in Zion City last 
year. 

Elx-Governor Bushnell, of Ohio, is dead. .Apo- 
plexy. 

Japan has seized passenger ships to hurry soldiers 
through. 

The fighting population of Russia, in an emergency, 
is 7,500,000. — . — 

And now a prominent doctor says radium will cure 
consumption. 

Senator Matthew Quay, of Pennsylvania, is report- 
ed seriously ill. 

Mrs. Wm. Leroy has had five boys since 1900, all 
born on Jan, 15. 



.\ force of United States marines landed at Seoul, 
Corea, to guard the .American embassy at that city. 



Tradesmen in Chicago are protesting against the 
closing of the theaters as injuring the after night busi- 
ness. 

The first rain of the season has fallen in Southern 
California, there having been no other rain since last 
May. 

D. W. Whitney, of Baltimore, Md., a cancer patient, 
has bequeathed his body to the doctors for dissec- 
tion. 

The courting between the Methodist church, North 
and South, has come to nothing and they will remain 
apart. 

.Si.x hundred Porto Rican teachers are coming to 
The United States has gained two open ports, in this country in a few months. They will visit Wash- 



Manchuria, by treaty. 



Dowie says he thinks he will build a city either on 
the Gulf or the Pacific coast. 



A blizzard in Pennsylvania has stopped the trains in 
the western part of the State. 



Japan has ordered one million pounds of canned 
3eef, at Chicago, for her army. 



At this writing it looks as though there would be no 
war between Japan and Russia. 



mgton. 

Miss JMary W'ooten died in an old part of the town 
and her cottage was found to contain, on search, the 
sum of $75,000. 

Jas. L. Blair, a prominent citizen of St. Louis, wor- 
ried himself to death over secret crimes and the double 
life he had led. 

Annie Burckhart, eighteen years old, of New York, 
grieved herself to death over the death of one of her 
lifelong; chums. 



Half a million telephones have been installed on 
farms during the past five years. 



The students of Wells College, .Aurora, 111., are quar- 
antined on account of smallpox. 



A tribe of white India ns has been discovered in Mex- 
ico just across the Arizona border. 



The second blue Mauritius stamp was sold in Lon- 
don for $7,250. It is said that it was bid in for the 
Prince of Wales. _^_ 

-A wife beater in New York got five years in prison 
by a judge who hopes by such metallic sentences to 
discourage brutality. 

.An effort is being made to have a constitutional 
amendment adopted to extend the President's term of 



/ The President asks Congress to do something to office to six years. The idea is a good one 
• gave the Calaveras, Cal., grove of big trees. 



There is some talk that Bryan may be elected Sena- 
tor of the L^nited States bv the Nebraska legislature. 



.An effort has been made on the Pacific coast to in- 
duce people to take to canned jack rabbits. The public 
refused the rabbits and the cannerv has closed. 



Girls at a school at Stamford, Conn., have under- 
taken to build a church, doing all the work themselves. 



\ number of people in Connecticut, women among 
them, are successfully trying the open air cure for con- 
sumption. They live out doors in all kinds of weather. 



Miss Louise Drew, daughter of the famous actor, 
John Drew, has been baptized into the Catholic church./ 



The Lott farm, near New York, in possession of 
that family for more than a hundred years, has been 
Armour & Co., of Chicago, are supplying the Rus-i sold for $178,000. It comprised only thirty-seven and 
isians in China with ten thousand cans of beef monthly, ^one-half acres. 



the: INGL.ENOOK. 



85 



A two-year-old bah}- in New York forced a pea into 
its nose and a doctor had to be called to get the 
obstruction out. 

Down in Sussex county, Va., a mob of negroes 
lynched one of their own race who had been ac- 
quitted of murder. 

.And now Panama wants to be admitted to the 
American Union. The Nook, knowing Spanish 
America, hopes not. 

Mrs. Ruth Brown Thompson, of Pasadena, Cal., eld- 
est daughter of John Brown of Harper's Ferry fame, is 
nigh unto death at her home. 



Building Inspector Laughlin, of Chicago, who was 

reported as having declared the Iroquois theater safe, 
denies emphatically that he did so. 



The W. C. T. U. in Chicago are trying to abolish 
saloori side doors, though it is not exactly clear what 
permanent good would come from it. 



A dozen or more churches in Chicago have been 
closed by the authorities on account of defective con- 
struction that would make trouble in case of fire. 



Every precaution is to be taken by the United States 
to make the construction of the Panama canal healthy 
work. Under De Lesseps the diggers died like flies. 



The will of the late Herbert Spencer is three news- 
paper columns long. He wants his body cremated, 
his autobiography short, and opposes the metric sys- 
tem. 

John D. Rockefeller has been unanimously elected 
superintendent of a Cleveland, Ohio, Sunday school by 
the three hundred members of the Baptist church at 
that place. 

Have you seen the electric fans used in summer 
time to cool a room? They are now used to heat the 
same room by throwing down the heated air. It 
works well. 



.A New York jury has ordered a man to pay $10,000 
for hugging and kissing the wife of his former coach- 
man. 

Chicago children under sixteen will not be allowed 
on a theater stage in that city after 7 o'clock in the 
evening. 

■' Daughters of the Faith," a new order composed 
of women, will try to stamp out vice in the so-called 
higher classes of society. 



L. M. Orr, married in 1888, was divorced and then 
went to California. There he went blind, returned 
to his former home, and has just eloped with the di- 
vorced wife. 

After having run away from home to go on the 
stage. Emaline Hicks, seventeen years old, now wants 
to go home, at Keokuk, Iowa. The man in the case 
deserted her. 

Chicago is talking about erecting a memorial of 
some kind on the site of the Iroquois theater where 
nearly six hundred people were burned to death a 
few weeks ago. 



In March there will be held in Chicago what they 
call a " Food Fiesta," showing the different foods and 
their manner of preparation. 



A Catholic society in New York has in hand the 
restriction of decollete gowns, discountenancing of di- 
vorces, the rejection of evil literature, and other re- 
forms. 

• 

John J. Brennan, late a Chicago alderman, is in jail 
after a protracted trial for buying votes. He is mak- 
ing brooms. For once justice asserted itself, even in 
Chicago. 

The Due D'Orleans, pretender to the throne of 
France, has asked the pope for a dispensation that he 
may be divorced. It is said that the pope will not 
grant the request. 

W. A. Thomas, a Michigan farmer, said he was go- 
ing insane and applied to the court to be adjudged 
insane. The petition was refused and two months 
later life was a ravina: maniac. 



It now appears that the ushers of the ill-fated Iro- 
quois theater at Chicago refused to allow the women 
and children to pass through the exits when they want- 
ed to get out. They probably acted on their best 
judgment but the result was most unfortunate. 



President Stickney of the Chicago Great Western 
railway, states that many of the terrible train wrecks 
of the last few weeks have been caused by pure care- 
lessness, and that head-end collisions and rear-end 
collisions are always caused by somebody blundering. 



Joe Monoghan, at Boise, Idaho, a well known cow- 
boy, who had served on juries and voted at all elec- 
tions, died the other day aged fifty-four. Those who 
prepared the body for the grave found that it was the 
body of a woman, the first hint anybody had of the 
sex of the ranee rider. 



A. prominent railroad official of a line running out 
of Chicago found, in watching, that eight freight and 
passenger trains ran by a station at which the light 
was intentionally extinguished. In consequence the 
engineers, firemen and conductors have an enforced 
sixtv-dav vacation. Thev took too much for granted. 



86 



HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



SLUMBERING BRAINS. 



That a man may have a better idea of the time 
of night when he awakens from a good sleep than 
he would have of the time of day, provided he 
were working unusually hard, with unusual intense- 
ness of purpose, is one of the odd facts connected 
with the operation of the human brain. 

But, on the other hand, if a man may work 
with such intensity of purpose as to forget the 
lapse of two or three hours of daylight, so he may 
sleep with a soundness that prevents the little time- 
keeper of the brain from making subconscious note 
of the hour hand of the clock in the night. As 
between the two conditions, however, it is the opin- 
ion of Dr. O. A: King, professor of nervous dis- 
eases in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
that the awakened sleeper usually has a better idea 
of the flight of the night than the other may have 
of the flight of the day. 

" Under ordinary circumstances the person who 
is in normal sleep is not asleep," said the doctor. 
" That one nook in the brain which takes cogni- 
zance of time is alert to an extent not appreciated 
by the layman. Awakening at any time in the 
night the person in good health and condition 
knows pretty closely whether it is midnight or 
after, or whether it be nearer two o'clock in the 
morning than it is four o'clock. Many persons 
have the faculty so cultivated that they know with- 
in the quarter hovirs of the exact time.- 

" On the other hand it is a common expression 
with persons in all lines of work suddenly to look 
at the clock and express the keenest surprise that 
it is so late in the afternoon or the evening; and 
occasionally one who has been working to poor 
advantage and under difficulties will be surprised 
on looking at his watch that it is so early. 

" That the brain in sleep keeps this tally upon 
the time is proved by the influences of anaesthetics. 
A person who has been profoundly under the influ- 
ence of any drug used for the purpose will be 
as utterly unconscious of the passing of ten min- 
utes as he will be unconscious of the passing of 
an hour. He may be forgetful of all conditions 
leading up to the state of anaesthesia and for the time 
being he may have forgotten the day of the week. 

" As to the time measurement in sleep, it is best 
represented in the person used to travel and to the 
catching of trains in the night. Many of these 
persons will be able to awaken at an hour giving 
them just the margin needed for preparation for 
the train. 

" One of the peculiarities of a person's waking 
for a train, or for any such emergency, is that the 
awakening always is sudden. There is none of the 
preliminary yawning, and stretching, and slowly 



returning sense of luxurious rest and comfort felt 
by the man who has slept a full sleep. In this 
awakening to a certain time the person frequently 
feels that impression of a sudden sound which he 
knows cannot have been made or uttered. Not in- 
frequently he has the sense that some one has called 
his name. He may be almost certain that he has 
heard his first name — ' George '• — called with the 
characteristic rising inflection. In almost any case 
his awakening is without any premonitory symp- 
toms. It is with a sort of jolt that he comes into 
full-fledged consciousness. In such cases as those 
where the sleep is profound beyond any conscious- 
ness of the time, the dream period of sleep is left 
far behind ; the sleep has approached the depth of 
anaesthesia." 

One of the oddities of sleep was referred to in 
which a person may lie down for rest without in- 
tending to sleep. ■ It may be morning or afternoon, 
but the fatigue that prompts the person to lie down 
overcomes him, and, after a sound sleep, he awakens 
without any knowledge of time in any sense. He 
does not realize whether it is morning or after- 
noon ; whether he has had luncheon, or whether 
he may not have slept through a day and a night, 
and awakened into another day. It is the opinion 
of Dr. King that in such a case the person experi- 
encing the sensations probably is not in a normal 
state of health. 

As an example of sleep that should be natural 
and close to the design of nature, and of an awak- 
ening that should be normal without the effect of 
an artificial civilization crowding it, the babe which 
has rested to the full and begins to arouse itself 
from slumber is an interesting study. 

With its little face on the pillow, unmarked of 
a line, and its breath coming with a silent regular- 
ity, its hands listless and still at its sides, the on- 
looker is assured of the absolute repose that is 
upon the child. As the hour for awakening ap- 
proaches, there may be just a little tremor shaking 
the whole body of the sleeper, and perhaps just 
the trace of a sigh following it. Then an eyelid 
will flutter for the width of a hair and the lips will 
close slightly. 

Sleep is preparing for flight. The eyelids close 
tightly and a frown comes over the baby face like 
a shadow over a field of June clover. The other 
arm is drawn up and the little hand seeks the baby 
face and the knuckles are bored into a closed eye ; 
there are more stretchings, more frowns, a throw- 
ing of the hands and feet right and left, another 
sigh, and then with an almost convulsive movement 
the eyelids pop open and wide and blue, or black or 
gray or brown, the pupils dilate and turn and roll 
toward walls and ceilings. Baby is awake. 



the: ingleinook. 



87 



A STRANGE PLANT. 



The strangest plant in the world, a plant which 
literally exists upon food carried to it b}' ants and 
finally upon ants themselves, and which grows inde- 
pendent of the soil, has just been sent to the 
university of Pennsylvania by William M. Maule, gov- 
ernment forester in the Philippine islands. 

The plant, known as Dischidia RafHesidna, of 
the same genus as the American milk weed, is 
found clinging to dead stalks of bamboo cane, 
about fifteen inches above the ground, having cut 
away all connection with the ground. 

Its principal leaf is shaped like a purse. Into 
this leaf ants attracted by a small granular growth 
come to feed. Finding an ideal little nook they 
set up housekeeping. 

In their little home the ants find a cistern ready 
for their collection of water. It grows within the 
main leaf and is shaped like a tiny pitcher. Sur- 
rounding the pitcher are little cells, as convenient 
as though purposely constructed for the storage 
of the food the ants have pillaged from their neigh- 
bors. The eggs of the ants, too, are deposited 
in these cells. 

At this stage of the game the plant develops 
a second and somewhat smaller leaf. This leaf 
is mouselike in shape and color. It seems to be 
purely ornamental, although it serves as an add- 
ed attraction to the home-seeking ant. inasmuch 
as it provides a charming promenade for Mrs. 
Ant and the babies of a summer afternoon. 

Once its cells are filled with food the plant be- 
gins proceedings in divorce against Mother Earth. 
From the stalk tiny roots shoot into the cup, 
where they multiply until they have filled every 
nook. The ants, resisting this encroachment, are 
at last caught in the maze of roots, and, like the 
good things they have stored away, are assas- 
sinated. 

This wonderful plant, seemingly endowed with 
instinct sufficient to suggest a brain, employs a 
very sensible method of getting up in the world. 
Once freed from its earthly entanglements, it puts 
forth tendrils which fasten firmly to the cane stalk 
- above. These being taut, lax tendrils are put out 
below. Then those above contract, and the plant 
works its way slowly but surely along the stalk. 
When the lower tendrils have been stretched to 
their limit the}'^ are discarded and a new set sub- 
stituted. 

As the Dischidia waxes sturdy after eating the 
ants,- it revels in a riot of color. The upper side 
of the pitcher leaf is bright green, the under sur- 
face purple, while the bell-shaped flower that the 
plant eventually puts out is a brilliant pink. Add- 
ed to these is the quiet gray of the mouse-col- 



ored leaf and the milky white flush which is ex- 
hibited here and there from the stalk. 

The evolution of the Dischidia is as rich in 
romance as the plant itself is rich in color. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Harshberger, of the University of 
{Pennsylvania, in whose charge the specimen sent 
by Mr. Maule has been placed, there is little 
doubt that the original of the plant is found in a 
specimen called " Dischidia Collaris." 

This species shows a long series of shell-like 
concave leaves, each sheltering a mass of leaf roots. 
The under surface has the same purple coloration 
as the Rafilesiania, and in its cavity holds small 
colonies of ants. 




.\NGORA GOATS D0\\'N IN OKLAHOMA. 

From this open leaf root the more highly spe- 
cialized roots of the Philippine specimen are 
evolved, producing the pitcher bearing stalk which 
in turn shelters the food roots. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
JAPAN AND RUSSIA. 



» How is a war between Japan and Russia likely to 
terminate? If there is any difiference in the desire for 
war Japan wishes it. Inflamed by the success with 
China, the government of Japan thinks it can whip 
Russia in a fair fight, and it would be unwise to say that 
such an outcome is impossible. But it is not likely that 
any great fruits of such success would materialize to 
Tapan. Rtissia would go on with her expansion of ter- 
ritory in other quarters and Japan would have to be 
content with her victory on sea and on land. It is like- 
ly to be a sharp and bloody war, while it lasts, and will 
probably be a revelation to the nations that look on. 
♦ * * 
A CHILD of God should be a visible beatitude for joy 
and happiness and a living doxology for gratitude and 
adoration. — Rev. C. H. Spnrgeon. 



88 



XHI 



INGLEINOOK. 



WHAT DYING IS LIKE. 



The dying man sees no horror in death. There 
is nothing frightful in dissolution to the man who 
knows he is about to die. This is what Benjamin L. 
Reitman, a much-traveled young man, who has the 
hobby of recording the last words of dying persons, 
told The Inter Ocean last Sunday. This is what a 
great psychologist, a physician and a minister, say 
to corroborate Reitman's statements. In their judg- 
ment death itself is not a terror. 

In substance, Reitman declared that no man, civil- 
ized or uncivilized, Christian or un-Christian, rich 
or poor, is frightened when he approaches the grave. 
Reitman has seen a great many people die. 

Professor George A. Coe of Northwestern univer- 
sity, who has achieved a national reputation as a psy- 
chologist ; Dr. Nathan S. Davis, Jr., one of Chicago's 
best-known medical men, and the Rev. Z. B. Phillips, 
pastor of Trinity Episcopal church, all give credence to 
Reitman's statements. They go farther than this, 
and declare what he has said is true. 

Reitman's investigations have extended to every 
part of the world. He has given much time to and 
taken much pains in his ghastly study. He has wit- 
nessed the death of men of every stamp of character 
and of every condition of living. He contends that 
no condition whatsoever alters the case ; that men die 
willingly and without fear. 

Taking up Reitman's statements separately, the Rev. 
Z. B. Phillips in each case agreed with the young trav- 
eler. 

" To the man who is well and in full possession of 
his senses death seems to be a thing of dread," says 
the Rev. Mr. Phillips. " To the man who knows he 
is dying death presents a wholly different aspect. I 
have been at the bedside of a good many dying per- 
sons. I have never seen but one show any signs of 
terror. That one was suffering from delirium tre- 
mens. Death held his torture for him. 

" One who has not thoroughly investigated the sub- 
ject would find it difficult to tell just why dying men 
see no horror in the going out from this life into 
something they do not foresee nor understand. In my 
judgrpent, however, it is because of the fact that all 
men approach a certain spiritual standard as their 
physical and mental strength wanes. There seems to 
be a gradual growth of the spiritual side of a man 
as he approaches the grave. He is inclined, as he 
grows weaker, to look upon himself more and more 
as having been not so bad a man after all. 

" The minds of dying men do not often dwell upon 
the thought of whether they are going to be plunged 
into some great punishment when they die. Their 
weakened minds seem almost incapable of grasping 
the idea of punishment. The good that is in them 



arises to crush out their wicked tendencies, and they 
forget the evil they have done. 

" There is much truth in Mr. Reitman's statement 
that it is the well man who sees the greatest dread in 
death, but I do not agree with his statement that the old 
man has no more dread of the end than has the young 
man. The old man does dread to die. I have talked 
with scores of men seventy years of age or older. 
Their one great and continual cry is, ' Oh, if I did not 
have to die so soon.' To them it may be true that 
death does not seem a horror, but it is certain that 
they have a far greater dread of it than do the young 
men. 

" I presume that the minister of the Gospel witnesses 
the death of more professed Christians than of other 
people. I have seen dying men in what might be 
called an ecstasy. I also saw one man who was in a 
terrible state of despair. He fought for life with the 
utmost determination. He begged and cried and 
prayed to be allowed to live. But as he grew weaker 
and as death came nearer he became calm and died 
without apparent fear. 

" When all cases are taken into consideration, in my 
judgment, it cannot be said that men really fear death. 
I attribute their state of feeling, as I have said, to the 
gradual ascendency which their spiritual side attains 
over their mental and physical selves." 

It is perhaps quite natural that the minister and the 
physician should view the question in a somewhat 
different light. The minister goes to the dying man 
to soothe his mind and to prepare him for the leave- 
taking. The physician goes to soothe his pain and, if 
possible, to make firmer his puny hold upon life. Yet 
the doctor comes in contact with the same evidences of 
dread or terror that the minister or the student sees. 
Several physicians in Chicago hospitals say that they 
have never seen any dying person evidence any dread 
of death. One physician, Dr. J. L. Adams, of the Chi- 
cago Baptist hospital, declared that every person who 
had come under his care and who had shown great 
fear of dying had recovered. He believes that while a 
person is in a state to fear death there is hope of 
his recovery. 

A well-known Chicago physician who sa\s that men 
do not fear to die is Dr. Nathan S. Davis, Jr. 

■' I think it can be generally stated that death has no 
terror for the dying man," he says. '" Jn all my prac- 
tice I have never seen but one person show any fear, 
and in his case it could easily be explained. This pa- 
tient was a young man dying with consumption. As 
death approached all his relatives grieved hysterically. 
This extremely nervous condition of the people about 
the dying young man proved contagious, and he became 
like them. He showed he feared death, but it was his 
hysterical condition, caused by the hysteria of those 
about him, that brouoht about his state of mind. 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



89 



■' Ordinarily men do not fear to die. In fact, per- 
haps the majority of persons approach death uncon- 
sciously. They are either in a state of coma or do not 
realize they are about to die. But even with those who 
do realize it, the fear, if there is any, and I think there 
is not, is not shown. 

■■ This condition is the same with men of every de- 
gree. It is the same with the good and the bad. the 
rich and the poor, the learned and the ignorant. 

" When a man approaches death he is in a state of 
almost complete physical exhaustion. He naturally, 
also, is in an almost complete state of mental exhaus- 
tion. His mind does not grasp the situation fully. He 
probably does not realize that a crisis is approaching. 
Xot knowing this, he is little likely to see any horror 
in dissolution." 

The study of the state of a person's mind just prior 
to the time of death bears greater interest to the psy- 
chologist than to any other man. A student of the 
function of the mind during a man's normal period, 
the psychologist becomes even more greatly interested 
in the workings of the mind that is failing. To the 
average psychologist the study of insanity, for in- 
stance, carries great interest, and the study of the 
mind that is soon to cease altogether to work is even 
more alluring. 

Professor George A. Coe, in speaking on the sub- 
ject, dealt particularly with the death of religious per- 
sons. Mr. Reitman, in telling of his experience among 
the persons of every sect and creed, said that dying 
religious persons were often subject to hallucinations ; 
that they had deathbed visions in which they claimed 
to see angels, or long-dead relatives, or a great light. 
Professor Coe agrees with Reitman in this state- 
ment, saying that religious persons often are subject to 
! these hallucinations. 

" Deathbed visions are of less significance than the 

general tenor of the life of the dying one," said Pro- 

i fessor Coe. " Religious persons often die in an ec- 

' sta.sy. but in m}^ judgment the clearest insight one 

I should hope for into spiritual things should be ex- 

I pected during the days of health and mental power, 

' and not at the moment of death. But these visions do 

1 serve, no doubt, to temper the dread of death. They 

j come, however, when the nervous system perhaps is 

; in disorder and likely to produce misleading impres- 

i sions. The vision of dying persons may be more like 

Ithe hallucinations of fever patients than anything else, 

yet this condition serves to rob death of its terror. In 

mv judgment men ordinarily do not dread to die." 

* ♦ .♦ 
THE MANY KINDS OF PROJECTILES WE USE. 



jectiles, shrapnel, and so on, in endless variety. As 
the work that the gun. whether ashore of afloat, will 
have to do can be pretty clearly predicted, it would ap- 
pear as though one, or at most two, kinds of pro- 
jectiles were enough. These two would naturally 
have, the one a high penetrative power, and the other a 
large capacity for internal charge, giving great de=- 
structive power when the shell is burst. No one who 
has not examined carefully the effect of bursting a 
shell in a closed space can have an idea of its de- 
structiveness. A small 6-pound shell, of about 2j4- 
inch diameter, containing three or four ounces of pow- 
der, burst in an ordinary room and breaking into twen- 
ty or thirty fragments, would probably destroy every- 
thing in the room. — John F. Meigs in the Iron and 
Steel Number of the Scientific American. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE VICTORIA MEDAL. 



Thk Victoria medal is made out of bronze from 
Russian guns captured in the Crimean war. The de- 
sign was the work of the prince consort of Queen 
Victoria. The medals are made separately and only 
when one is needed. Thus when some soldier or sail- 
or, no matter what his rank may be, has shown " con- 
spicuous bravery or devotion to the country in the 
presence of danger," as the act reads, the 
war office sends to the royal jewelers the bronze needed 
for the medal. It is carefully cast, filed smooth 
around the edges and then the design is brought out 
by chasing. The soldier's medal is suspended by a 
red ribbon and that of the sailor by a blue piece of 
silk. 

<■* ♦ ♦ 
THE MAGNET AS A SURGEON. 



We have now armor-piercing projectiles, deck- 
piercing projectiles, semi-armor-piercing projectiles, 
common forged and cast-steel projectiles, cast-iron pro- 



EvERY little while some new use for electricity is 
reported. That of drawing steel to a magnet is not 
new, but a new application of this principle to surgery 
was recently added to the list. 

An employe in the navy yard at Vallejo, California, 
was struck in the face by a piece of flying metal. A 
surgeon had attempted to remove the metal, but it was 
afterwards discovered that he had failed to locate all 
of it, and that some still remained in the wound. 

Master Electrician Petrie rigged up a magnet cap- 
able of lifting five hundred pounds. This was held 
over the boy's face and the current turned on. In an 
instant the piece of metal flew from its hiding-place 
and attached itself to the magnet. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

There is no noble life save that which is lived above 
the uncharitableness, the discontent which fills human 
intercourse every day. ... At the last there can 
be no beauty for you or me but the beauty of holi- 
ness. — Mrs. Marv Clemmer Hudson. 



9° 



the: ingleinook. 



DOWIE AND DOWIEISM. 



Every Nook reader has heard of Dowie, the rehgi- 
oiis enthusiast of Chicago. A great many people 
have not seen liim and are led to beheve that he is 
a sort of crank or imposter of whom everybody should 
beware. It is doubtful whether Dowie is fully under- 
stood by the Nook family. 

The article that follows this is the result of a Chi- 
cago newspaper man's interview with him giving the 
facts in the case as he sees them and as Dowie told 
him. The chances are that Dowie is a man of won- 
derful executive ability and strong personality, and 
what is said here, if correctly quoted, will give every 
reader an insight into the man's character, and serve 
to advance knowledge along these lines. 

Dowie is a shrewd business man, and as a home 
man is impressive. In his home he is serene and 
calm and considerate. He admires his wife and has 
made her his partner in everything. Nor is Over- 
seer Jane Dowie a force to be overlooked in Zion. 
She is a motherly woman, calm eyed and peaceful, in- 
tensely devoted to her husband. In their family life 
they seem perfect, and the loss of their daughter a 
few months ago has bound them even closer. Both 
show the effects of that bereavement. Both are de- 
voted to their son. The general overseer says his 
pride in his son has been aroused by the reports of 
the boy's character and behavior as shown in his col- 
lege and earlier life. The son is like, yet unlike the 
father. He is athletic, fond of sport, handsome, and 
finely educated. Yet he is of Zion and his father's 
stanch lieutenant in the law department — which in 
Zion is strong with men who have graduated from 
the law schools of Harvard, Yale, and Ann Arbor 
universities, and from the University of Chicago. 
Dowie relies upon law as well as on the gospel. 

But another revelation of Dowie's character was 
made later in his library. There, surrounded by 
books, he is at home, and the student shows out all 
over him. In the shelves in his library are works in 
Sanskrit, in the almost unknown by name languages 
of ancient India, great volumes of Chinese writings, 
and these Dowie reads. When he cannot read a lan- 
guage he either learns it or summons one of his fol- 
lowers, who are recruited from almost every race 
(there are over fifty nationalities represented in Zion 
City), and has it read to him. Dowie converses with 
his Chinese adherents intelligently, and converses 
fluently. He is an authority on Chinese history and 
literature. 

" Where does this man get time to learn these 
things? " I asked one of his right hand men later. He 
told me. Dowie works eighteen, twenty, sometimes 
twenty-four hours a day. tireless, sleepless, and sus- 
tained by his immense physical energy. He has 
worked as many as forty hours with scarcely a stop 



even for meals. He has preached and prayed all day 
and all evening, then returning to his office written all 
night to fill the editorial columns of the paper that 
Zion prints. This work he will delegate to none, be- 
lieving that most of his converts have been reached 
through "Leaves of Healing." 

Speaking of Zion's paper, I met its real head. Dea- 
con Arthur Newcomb, a clean, intelligent young man, 
to whom Dowie has delegated practically all the edi- 
torial work done in Zion. He is a graduate of Ripon 
college and was a newspaper man before he was con- 
verted to Dowieism, and, as a newspaper man, he 
told me a " hard luck story." 

" I suppose you think our papers bad from a news- 
paper point of view," he asked. " Well, look over the 
situation. We have been here over two years in Zion 
City. During that time we have never had a fight, a 
row, a social scandal, any' litigation inside of Zion, 
no police court, no drunkenness, and practically no 
social happenings. How would you get up your kind 




GARFIELD COUNTY HARVESTING SCENE. 

of a newspaper here? We take a ditfercnt plan. Our 
paper is a printed testimonial meeting. It is edited 
down to the masses. We have here in Zion seventy 
different nationalities. Many of them know but little 
English. We use the shortest, simplest, and purest 
Anglo-Saxon words. Most of the converts have been 
reached through ' Leaves of Healing.' I know of no 
other religious paper that even claims or even aims 
to convert people — we do." 

We were eating fruit at luncheon, when Dowie re- 
vealed another glimpse of himself. Lapsing into 
quaint, gentle Scotch brogue, he told of a vine-covered 
home in Australia and of his old Scotch mother giving 
fruit to the children who looked longingly in through 
the vines. " I would say to her : ' Mother, ye will fill 
the bairns sae fu' o' fruit they canna carrv hame their 
beskits.' " 

niat led to speaking of his earlier life in Scotland. 
" We were deep^ly religious," he said, " and the Bible 
was our law. Our home life was simple and sincere. 
Then I went out to Australia. Many stories have 
been told of what I did there. I prospered in business. 



H 



INGLEINOOK. 



91 



You (^Dowie has an embarrassing way of charging the 
reporter directly with all the sins of the newspapers) 
once said that I amounted to nothing out there. Well, 
the then premier of New South Wales, Sir Henry 
Parks, once offered me tlie portfolio of minister of 
education. I was a- young man then and a Congrega- 
tional minister in Sydney." 

I asked Dowie regarding his title, Elijah the Restor- 
, er, and this is what he told me : 

" The name is not a title ; it is a reality. I firmly 
believe, in common with tens of thousands of my fol- 
; lowers, that I have been sent by God, 'in the spirit 
and power of Elijah,' as the third and last manifesta- 
tion of that prophet. 

" The first manifestation was in Elijah (which 
means Jehovah is my God) twenty-eight centuries ago, 
when the worship of Baal was triumphant in Israel. 
This was Elijah the Destroyer. 

• ■' The second manifestation was in the person of 
John the Baptist (Matthew 10: 13-14). 
■■ He was Elijah the Preparer. 

" The third manifestation of Elijah is in my person, 
of whom Christ spoke, after John the Baptist's death, 
when he admitted the correctness of the rabbinical 
contention, 'Elijah must first come,' saying: 'Elijah 
indeed cometh and shall restore all things.' 
; " I am Elijah the Restorer." 

1 Until then I had intended to speak with Dowie re- 
garding doubts as to his own honesty expressed by 
" outsiders." That settled it. One cannot listen to 
'Dowie and doubt his sincerity of belief in himself 
ind his work. If he has " hypnotized his followers," 
IS his critics claim, he has doubly hypnotized himself. 
Dowie turns from the rhapsodies of a fanatical re- 
ligious leader to the keen, incisive speech of a political 
boss or to the shrewd talk of a captain of industry 
,vith bewildering rapidity, and yet he keeps them all 
In their place. I had been through his great lace 
'rnill, and his big candy factory, so we spoke of them. 
The candy factory just happened," he said. " We 
had among our people a candy maker. A year ago 
be was making candy in a little tent over across Shiloh 
|joulevard there. I found that my children (he speaks 
.ilways of all the children of Zion as 'his children') 
Vere eating candy, that they would eat candy, and that 
;nost of the candy they ate was impure. So we start- 
sd our candy factory. We have trained our people 
10 make candy. The girls take to it natur- 
illy and it is nice work. Candy is on every 
able in Zion at all times. We find that the 
:hildren eat less of it when it is always there to be 
■aten." 

That candy factory employs over 300 workers and 
urns out tons of candy, all made ftom pure mate- 
ials. It is delicious candy and all grades are made. 
Phe factory cannot supply the demand. When it 



first started on a big scale two traveling men were 
sent out. They were recalled in a few weeks and 
since then the Zion candy factory never has been able 
to catch up with its orders. 

The persons employed are paid approximately 20 
per cent more than under the union scale demanded 
by the workers recently defeated in Chicago, and the 
dipping is artistic and workmanship more perfect than 
that in the union candy factories of Chicago. Yet a 
year ago only one man in Zion City knew how to make 
candy. 

♦ ♦ 4* 

TROUBLE IN BIRDLAND. 



L.'\ST spring a couple of red-headed woodpeckers 
started to build a nest in a telegraph pole in one of the 
rural sections of Eastern Pennsylvania. The pole was 
an old one, having been spliced, and the birds began to 
dig out a hole at this point. Perhaps they thought 
when they sounded the spot that there was a rotten 
place within where it would be easy work making a 
nest. 

But they were doomed to be disappointed, for the 
pole was a firm one, and the building of their home pro- 
gressed slowly. They were gritty, however and re- 
lieved each other at short intervals, and the " tap, tap " 
of their bills went on steadily from sunrise to sunset. 

Their perseverance won out at last, and they had a 
home that they might call their own. For the first 
time in several weeks they left the spot together, prob- 
ably to celebrate the finishing of the nest. While they 
were away a sparrow chanced to discover the hole, 
and proceeded at once to jump the claim during the 
absence of the rightful owners. 

When the woodpeckers returned from their cele- 
bration thev discovered the sparrow lugging straw 
into their home as fast as it could be carried. If 
birds can swear, those two woodpeckers did when they 
went for that sparrow with blood in their eyes. From 
their actions it was plainly to be seen that they tried 
to impress the interloper with the fact that they hadn't 
been working on that hole for a month for the fun of 
the thing. The sparrow was lucky to escape with 

his life. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Guard within yourself that treasure, kindness. 
Know how to give without hesitation, how to lose with- 
out regret, how to acquire without meanness. Know 
how to replace in your heart, by the happiness of those 
you love, the happiness that may be wanting in your- 
self. — F. W. Faber. 

*> ♦ ♦ 

Contentment is not to be caught by long and 
foreign chases, he is likeliest to find it who sits at home 
and daily contemplates those blessings which God has 
placed within his reach. — The Church in Georgia. 



92 



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WHEN CONVERSATION CEASED. 



The butcher's boy was such a bright little chap that 
the fourth-floor woman engaged him in conversation 
while writing out her order. 

" You have all the trade of this house, haven't 
vou ? " she asked. 

•• Yes'm." 

•■ And do you call for all the orders the same as 
here?" 

" Yes'am." 

"And I suppose you go to other buildings, too?" 

" Yes'm ; lots of 'em." 

The woman looked at him admiringly. " Dear 
me," she said, " what a splendid head you must have 
to remember so many things! Don't you get people 
mixed sometimes ? " . 

" No ma'am," he said. " I used to," he added, 
wanning into speech under her genial smile, " but I 
don't any more. Anyhow, I'd never get mixed about 
the families in this house. I know 'em too well. 
Why, I know 'em so well that when the boss tells me 
to come over here and get the orders he don't even 
have to call the families by name. We've got this 
building down fine, all of us fellows in the shop has, 
because there is always so much music going on. 
The first floor folks have a piano, and when the boss 
sends me to them he says, ' Go and see what the piano 
needs this morning.' The second floor is the cornet, 
the third the fiddle, and the fifth is the banjo. Even 
the folks in the basement go in for music. The boy 
down there has a mouth organ." 

The fourth-floor woman smiled still more broadly. 

" I have noticed the confusion of sounds," she said. 
" But what about the fourth floor? We have no musi- 
cal instruments at all. What does the boss say when 
he sends you to us ? " 

" Oh, we fix that all right," was the airy reply. 
■■ He says, ' Just drop in, Willie, and see what that 
woman with the fog-horn voice wants to-day.' " 

And that ended the conversation. 
^ 4. ^ 
LEFT-HANDED VITUPERATIVES. 



One of the gravest objections to training a child 
to be left-handed is the certainty that it will be nick- 
named from its peculiarity, especially during the early 
vears of life. Most countries in England have their 
idiomatic expressions to denote left-handedness, and 



they are prefixed to the unfortunate left-hand- 
ed child's name. In London the term is knack hand- 
ed, the word being also equivalent to awkward. In 
Lancashire it is k-pawed, in Yorkshire gallock or gawk 
handed, an expression dating back to at least the sev- 
enteenth century. In Derbyshire are used the terms 
keg handed, cork handed and corky handed, while in 
the Teedale district cuddy handed is common, and in 
Nottinghamshire wallet handed. 

In the south of England special terms to denote left- 
handedness are also found. In Dorts it is scrame 
handed, and in Devonshire coochy handed. In Scot- 
land we find gawk handed, and in the west cawry 
handed. In Ireland a left-handed man is called a kith- 
ogue. Mr. Tim Healy used this word in a speech at 
East Wicklow, in which he said that Mr. O'Kelly 
could fight with his left hand and had already given 
liis opponent some '' kithogues " that would spoil his 
political beauty during the contest. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 
GOOD SOUP FOR ALL. 



i 



Winter with its cold days is here and nothing will 
be more welcome than a plate of hot soup. We often 
hear that the German soups stand in great favon 
with the general public, and many a man says : " B 
go to such and such a restaurant because there they 
have such good German soups." 

What is the reason for this? Generations of 
thought and attention have brought to perfection the 
rich, satisfying soups of the German housewife. The 
cooking of soup is simple, and everybody can cook a 
good soup who will take the time. It is necessary to 
boil thoroughly whatever ingredients are used, accord- 
ing to the kind of soup to be prepared — that means, 
give water and fire plenty of time to accomplish their 
work. 

For a meat soup the meat or the soup bone should 
be put on the fire with cold water on a small flame. 
Never let soup boil hard, but let it simmer. A kitchen 
bouquet may be had in market, but many a housewife 
may find it simpler and better to arrange the soup 
greens herself. Plenty- of celery, one onion, and one 
or two tomatoes give the soup a good flavor. After 
three to four hours" simmering strain the soup and 
then add the desired thickening, either noodles, barley, 
rice, or sago, two heaping tablespoonfuls of any one 
of these will give soup, enough for six persons, a 
good consistency. The Germans are fond of home- 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



93 



made noodles, and it is no great art to make them, 
, only it takes time. One egg, one teaspoonful milk, a 
; pinch of salt, and flour enough to roll out. After 

the dough is rolled thin let it dry, then cut it fine 
, and boil in the soup for twenty minutes. 
I 4> * 4> 

MEANING OF EPICURE. 



FOR THE BUSY HOUSEKEEPER. 



It is wonderful that so many quotations are wrongly 
made and favorite excerpts so generally misconstrued. 
There is hardly a name in history so often travestied as 
that of Epicurus. If one only were a true Epicurean 
in all matters of food, dress, amusement and what not, 
how long and happy, barring accident, life would be. 
Let us understand something of Epicureanism. It 
bears directly on health and happiness. Epicurus was 
'a Greek philosopher who taught that there was no use 
in clinging to life,, unless one's life is happy ; filled with 
the best pleasures. Now, said Epicurus, the only 
' way to promote long life and happiness is to be careful 
about both the quantity and quality of one's pleasures. 
jSeek always the higher enjoyments; deny yourself the 
Slower pleasures, for the latter are generally de- 
structive of body and mind. Seek the higher enjoy- 
ments only, for they do the body good, and preserve 
ilife. In short, whether eating or drinking, or being 
merry, follow what in the long run promotes long life 

and happiness. 

4. .> .;. 

ASTRAKHAN. 



Do women know why it is that astrakhan, or Persian 
lamb, costs so much ? It isn't because in and of it- 
self it is especially beautiful, or especially becoming, 
for it is neither. It is the cost of life that they are 
baying for. Just as the female is about to give birth 
to the kid, she is killed, and the skin stripped from 
the unborn, but often living, little one. This inhuman 
practice is owing to the fact that only in this way 
tan the soft, fine silkiness of the skin be preserved. 

\fter birth it becomes harsh and wiry. Two lives 
have to be taken to get one small skin, and this is 
ivhat makes astrakhan so dear. This, too, is why I 

hudder when I see a woman wearing an astrakhan 
toat or cape. — Celia Logan. 

♦ ♦ •?• 
BEGINNING EARLY. 



Ethel (aged to) — " Mamma, where is your com- 

)lexion powder?" 
Mamma — " What do you want with it, dear?" 
Ethel — " I'm going on a hunting trip." 
Mamma — " Why, that isn't the kind of powder 

lunters use." 
Ethel — " But it's the kind women use when they 

lunt husbands, isn't it?" 



For a pot and pan cleaner use a liber brush patterned 
after a dish mop. . 

When the loaf of bread has been cut it will keep 
fresh if laid in the box with the cut end down. 



When the foot has gone to sleep, rub the cords of 
the leg under the knee, and the pain will stop almost 
instantly. . 

When making ice cream a large wooden mallet 
crushes the ice sufficiently fine and does not break the 
burlap bag. ^ 

Pop corn and roast chestnuts over gas, by putting 
them in the oven in a covered metal roaster or in two 
pans turned together. 

* 

Cake is softer made with water instead of milk, as 
the milk when exposed to heat in combination with the 
eggs hardens the latter. 

* 

The bathroom sponge keeps sweet if the juice of a 
lemon is worked into it occasionally and rinsed out 
again with warm water. 

* 

To keep free from dust the " dabs " of batter and 
sauce that are set away in the pantry, hem squares of 
cheesecloth, 8x10 inches, and lay over them. They 
launder easily and admit the air. 

* 

Clarify grease or drippings by putting them in a 
basin and pouring boiling water over them. Let stand 
until cold. Scrape the impurities off the lower part, 
and if wanted for pastry repeat the process. 

♦ •■> ♦ 
MAPLE SUGAR COOKIES. 



One cupful of sugar, one cupful of grated maple 
sugar and one cupful of butter, two well-beaten eggs, 
two tablespoonfuls of water, and flour enough to roll 
out. Be sure not to make it too stiff. Bake in a 
quick oven. 

*j* ^ 4* 

The Maryland cook makes very toothsome maple 
sugar waffles. To the beaten yolks of four eggs, 
add one pinch of salt, a pint of milk, one cupful 
of shaved maple sugar and enough flour to make a 
stiff batter. After mixing to a smooth consistency, 
thin the batter by adding gradually the beaten whites 
of the eggs. The batter should be thin enough to pour 
from a teacup. Have the waffle irons thoroughly hot, 
and well greased with lard. Each waffle is buttered 
when done, and served piping hot. 



94 



THE INGLEINOOK 



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CHRISTMAS TREASURES. 



BY EUGENE FIELD. 



I count my treasures o'er with care — 

A little toy that baby knew. 

A little sock of faded hue, 
A little lock of golden hair. 
Long years ago this Christmas time, 

My little one — my all to me — 

Sat robed in white upon my knee. 
And heard the merry Christmas chime. 

"Tell me, my little golden head, 

If Santa Claus should come to-night, 
What shall he bring my baby bright, 

What treasure for my boy! " I said. 

.And then he named the little toy. 
While in his round and truthful eyes 
There came a look of glad surprise 

That spoke his trustful, childish joy. 

And, as he lisped his ev'ning prayer. 
He asked the boon with baby grace. 
And, toddling to the chimney place. 

He hung his little stocking there. 

That night, as lengthening shadows crept, 
I saw the white-winged angels come 
With music to our humble home, 

.'\nd kiss my darling as he slept. 

He must have heard that baby prayer. 
For in the morn, with glowing face, 
He toddled to the chimney place 

And found the little treasure there. 

They came again one Christmastide, 
That angel host, so fair and white, 
And, singing all the Christmas night. 

They lured my darling from my side. 

A little sock, a little toy, 

A little lock of golden hair. 

The Christmas music on the air, 
A-watching for my baby boy. 
But if again that angel train 

And golden head come back for me. 

To bear me to eternity. 
My watching will not be in vain. 

* 4> * 

MOON TALES OF MANY LANDS. 



When the boys and girls of Germany are asked 
what they see in the moon they answer just as Ameri- 
can children : — 

" Why, a man, of course. He was sent there for 
punishment, and must stand forever with a bundle of 
sticks on his back, because he was wicked enough to 
gather faggots on Sunday." 






But the Chinese little people would be quite sur- 
prised to hear that story. They would tell you that a 
rabbit, and not a man, lives in the moon. They are 
quite sure about it, because once, long ago, a little boy 
in China was sent to bed without his supper because 
he had not used his chopsticks properly, and so spille 
rice over his clean blouse. 

Then, as he lay in bed with the moon shining on him] 
and crying because he was so hungry, a tiny hand 
touched him and a kind voice said : 

" Here, little boy, is a bowl of rice. The rabbit 
in the moon sent it to you." 

Little Ah Lee jumped up and ran to the window. 

" Oh," he cried, " is there a rabbit in the moon? " 

" To be sure," was the answer. " Can't you see 
him? He is pounding his rice in a bowl." 

Then little Ah Lee pressed his face against the 
window and looked very hard. 

■' I see him," he cried joyfully, " What a nice, kind 
rabbit he must be." 

Since then every little Chinese boy has been able 
to see this rabbit, too. 

When the little Hottentot, the funny little brown 
boy, who lives in far away Africa, and who greases 
his face instead of washing it, and never combs his 
hair, asks his mother about the moon this is the story 
she tells him : 

One day the moon said to the hare : " Go to the 
earth and tell the people that just as I rise again after 
dying away so shall they die and again come to life.' 

But the stupid hare did not carry the kind message 
right. He told the people that the moon boasted thai 
she rose again, but, that they died forever. When the 
moon heard this she was very angry. She took an ax( 
to cut off the hare's head, but the axe missed and onlj 
cut his lip open. Ever since then the hare's childrei 
have a " hare lip." The pain of the cut made the har( 
so wild that he flew at the moon and almost scratchec 
her eyes out. Tlie black scars on the moon's face ar< 
the marks of the hare's claws. 

Quite a different story is told to the children of Ice 
land. 

When Jack and Jill fell down the hill, they say, the 
moon picked them up. She wiped away Jill's tears 
and patched Jack's crown. Then, taking one under 
each arm, she flew up to the sky again. There they 
draw water for her, and sometimes their buckets tilt 
over and the water spills. Then the people on earth 
.sav it rains. 



THl 



INGLEINOOK. 



95 



3>V^ 



3 Tfie ($♦ i& (3^* B*spGirtment* l 



t 



i 



i^/y^ 



Will the Nook please give the real tacts about ginseng 
culture? 

As there is much interest in the growing of ginseng 
the Nook will reprint a presentation of the subject 
by a Japanese finn, telling how it is best clone. The 
advertisements of many of the people engaged in sell- 
ing seed and plants are thoroughly misleading. The 
article the Nook will print is believed to be accurate, 
and it will be an eye opener to those who think they can 
plant the seed this spring and harvest a few thousands 
of dollars' worth of ginseng next fall. 

* 

Is there any remedy for excessive leanness or obesity? 
Lean people can get fat quicker than fat persons 
can get thin. Eat often and much, taking little exer- 
cise, and no doubt but that you will get fatter. If 
too fat eat less and work hard. The chances are that 
the lean and the fat kinds of people are so for some 
good reason, if in health, and it is not safe or wise to 
itamper with the situation. If you are enjoying good 
(health let matters alone. 

* 

A railroad train goes a mile a minute. A man throws 
a ball at the rate of a mile a minute. Can he hit the far 
end of the car? 

i Yes, every time, if he throws it hard enough to 
reach the far end. Have you never seen flies in a car 
working their way in every direction ? The car and 
ail in it have the car's onward motion, plus the ve- 
locity of the thing moved inside of it, and this makes it 
possible. 

* 

How is oil for burning purposes exported? 
I It is shipped either in tin cases or in bulk. When 
in bulk the oil is run into the hold of the vessel with 
nothing but a thin skin of steel between the oil and 
the water. Once the cargo is discharged, in the far 
jeast, say, the hold is cleaned with hot steam, and it is 
jSaid that there is not the faintest odor remaining. The 
iVessels often bring back cargoes of silks and spices. 

I * 

! Is there anything in the advertised hair restorers? 

I Nearly all of them are nothing but concealed dyes. 
If you once begin their pernicious use you will have to 
ceep it up. The Nook's advice is. Don't. 

* 

Do cats contract hydrophobia as well as dogs? 

Yes, they do. The symptoms and after trouble of 
he bite of a mad cat are the same as those of a mad 
log. 



How is a flow of natural gas shut off? 

The question is not a clear one, but after the well is 
piped it is turned off and on with a stop cock, as a 
\\'ater tank might be, but when the volume of gas es- 
capes at once on the drill's striking a reservoir the 
process is often a difficult and tedious one. 

* 

What is sterilizing, and how is it done? 

Every time a nursing bottle, or an ordinary milk 
pan is washed out with scalding hot water it is steril- 
ized. There are sterilizing machines, but it all comes 
to the same thing in principle. Hot water is supposed 
to kill microscopic life. 

* 

Where can I buy radium? 

Unless you have the revenues of a kingdom better 
not try buying radium. All there is in the world you 
could put in your vest pocket, and then it would burn 
a hole in you at that. Even among those who work 
with it a little goes a long ways. 

* 

Is there such a thing as a medicine that one can take 
and eat anything that is craved, the medicine digesting it? 

There is no such thing, never was, and never will 
be. Nothing can take the place of chewing food, the 
effects of the saliva, and the general health of the in- 
dividual. 

What is the best encyclopedia? 

There are many of them, and a cheap, small one, is 
not worth having. The Britannica is one of the best. 
It is rather high-priced, but is good for a lifetime, 
if a recent edition. 

Why are railroad trains known by numbers and not 
names as the public knows them? 

Because numbers are easier, shorter and more accu- 
rate. Note that the odd numbered trains are all run- 
ning one way, the even numbers the other. 

What was the probable motive of the woman who 
tried to ruin the painting in the Topeka State capitol 
building? 

Who can tell? Probably a form of religious mania 

possessed her. 

* 

What is the size of meteorites? 

They are all sizes from dust to between ten and fif- 
teen thousand tons. The large sized ones are rather 
rare. 



96 



■HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



THE CODE OF HAMMURABI. 



( )f more than passing interest is the Code of Ham- 
murabi, who was king of Babylonia 2250 years before 
Christ. The code is a brief of the decisions of the 
courts of that time and tliere arc two hundred and 
eighty of theifi, that is to say two hundred and eighty 
decisions rendered by the judges of that day. They 
reveal the outline of a civilization comparatively com- 
plex, and the problems which came before the courts 
of that day were very much the same as those which 
call for adjudication to-day. 

k will be seen from the subjoined samples of these 
decisions what the people of those days regarded as 
law. Note the fact that the death penalty is applied 
with more frequency than in modern instances and 
that they had family quarrels in those days as well 
as at present : 

Section 3. 

If a man, in a case (pending judgment), utters threats 
against the witnesses, (or) does not establish the testi- 
mony that he has given, if that case be a case involving 
life, that man shall be put to death. 

Section 4. 

If a man (in a case) offers (as a bribe) grain or money 
to the witnesses, he shall himself bear the sentence passed 
in that case. 

Section 21. 

If a man practices brigandage and is captured, tliat man 
shall be put to death. 

Section 53. 
If a man neglects to strengthen his dyke and does not 
strengthen it, and a break is made in his dyke and the 
water carries away the farm land, the man in whose dyke 
the break has been made shall restore the grain which he 
has damaged. 

Section 106. 

If a wineseller does not receive grain as the price of 
drink, but receives money by the great stone, or if she 
makes the measure for drink smaller than the measure for 
corn, they shall call that wineseller to account, and they 
shall throw her into the water. 

Section 142. 

If a woman hates her husband, and says; "Thou shall 
not have me," they shall inquire into her antecedents for 
her defects; and if she lias been a careful inistress and is 
without reproach and her husband has been going about 
and greatly belittling her, that woman has no blame. She 
shall receive her presents and shall go into her father's 

house. 

Section 143. 

If she has not been a careful mistress, has gadded 
about, has neglected her house and has belittled her hus- 
band, they shall throw that woman into the water. 

4> 4* * 

THE WOMAN'S ISSUE. 



NOOK from end to end, and a great many contributors 
would be pleased to send their material if they only 
knew what was wanted. Allow us to suggest the fol- 
lowing: Should there be too many of one kind they 
can go into succeeding issues. Send us recipes. Bu- 
reau Drawer material, articles on things about the 
house and their use, short stories for the children for 
Aunt Barbara's page, in fact, any class of material 
that seems adapted to the general make-up of the 
Inglenook. 

Do not hesitate to write whatever you think would 
be of advantage as it will all receive careful consider- 
ation and will be put in shape for the printer at our 
office. Let it be over your own name, and we will 
have a Nook that will be read from the Atlantic to the 
Pacific and from far off Canada to Mexico. 

* ♦ * 
AN EXPLANATION. 



Thk reference to possible frauds advertising in the 
lNGLr-:NOOK, in a recent issue, inay have been con- 
strued into meaning Chicago firms advertising with 
us. Such is not the case. .\s far as known the com- 
mercial standing of the various firms represented in 
the advertising pages of the magazine is such as to 
merit the entire confidence of the readers. 
♦ ♦ •?• 

Some of the small booklets given to subscribers to 
the Nook have been returned to this office because 
some other book than the one indicated by the title was 
bound into the right cover. These books are not inade 
here, and the fault lies with the publisher, and doubt- 
less with no intent on his part. Once a book is print- 
ed, its pages are assetnbled in their place in the book 
to be. This is done by unskilled help, and is some- 
times done wrong. In the cases in point it seems that 
the right cover was put on the wrong books. In all 
such cases send them here for exchange, and it will 
be made right. 

Contributions to the woman's issue of the Ingle- 
nook are now in order. Send thein in at once. 
Short, and to the point, will find favor in the eyes of 
the Editor. 

Want Advertisements. 



Contributions for the woman's issue of the Ingle- 
nook are coming in most commendably and they are 
of an unusually high character in a literary way. We 
are still in need of quite a number to fill the Ingle- 



A bright little girl, eight years old, healthy, strong, 
and of good habits, can be had to raise by the right 
kind of people. She has Brethren ancestry, and goes 
from a Christian home to what the inother hopes will 
be the same. This is a fine chance for some one wish- 
ing a bright, helpful little girl, .\ddress, for the par- 
ent's location, with particulars. The Editor of the 
Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



HI 



INGLEINOOK, 



Enreka Indestrnctible Post 



n|,l,llltfl,|,|,l|,l,HU' 



Cheapascedar. 

Made where 

s e d . No 

freight to pay. 

For terms, etc.. 



Great inducements to agents 

address with stamp. 

36t.is W. A. DICKEY. North Manchester. Ind 



SENT ON APPROVAL 
to Responsible People 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pen H 



Guaranteed Finest Grade 
14k. Solid Gold Pen. 

To test the merits of the 
Inglenook as an advertis- 
ing medium we ofter your 
choice of 





These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles; 
For Only 



$1.00 



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Postpaid 

to any 

Address. 



(By registered mail S cents 
extra.) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size 14k. golcT pen, 
any flexibility desired— ink 
feeding device perfect. 

Either style — Kiclily 
Gold Mounted for pre- 
sentation purposes, ifi.oo 
extra. 

Qrand Special Offer 

Vou may try the pen a 
week, if you do not find it 
as represented, fully as 
fine a value as yon can se- 
cure for three times the 
price in any other makes, 
if not entirely satisfactory 
in every respect return it 
and we will send you Si. 10 
for it, the additional ten 
cents is for your trouble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
pen. 

Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right. Gentlemen's style. 

Lay this Inglenook 
doTvn and ivrite NOW 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold- 
er sent free of charge with 
each Pen. 

ADDRESS 

Langhlin Mfg. Co. 

970 Qriswold St., 
0'=TPOIT. - MICH 

Menunn ihp IXGLENOOK when wnni 



FREE SAMPLE 

Sendletteiorpostal for tree SAMPLE 

HIIDOO TOBACCO HABIT CURE 

We core yon of chewing and smoking 
lorSOc or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
hannless. Address Milford Drag Co., Milford, 
indiana. We answer all letters. 

SItljt *'ennon the IK6LEN00K when writinK- 




In the Inglenook 

There is always room for wide- 
awake advertisers, who can appre- 
ciate the superior advantages of 
our journal. Write us. 



ARE YOU LOOKING 



FOR THE BEST SEWING 

AIACRINE ON EARTH? 



If so, look for the 
highest Arm made, 
latest Bobbin Wind- 
er, Patent Tension 
Liberator, Positive 
Take-up, Thread di- 
rect from Spool to 
Needle. Double Lock 
Stitch, widest ran^e 
of adjustment. Self- 
threading Shuttle. 
Self-setting Needle. 
Ball-beH^iIlg■.^vit1l 
25 years' gunran- 
tee. Our " Kquity" 
has all of these, and 
you may have the 
privilege of ordering 
it at our 



SPECIA.T. 'CASH PRICK 

which is lower thanMealers 
pay for them. 



S16.45 



For our High Arm, High 
Grade, Ball-bearing, Ne^v |^' 
Equity Sewing Machine, 
complete in this style cabinet 



SEND FOR CATALOG. 




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THE EQUITY MFG. & SUPPLY CO 
Chicago, 111. 



INDIA==A PROBLEM 



By W. B. STOVER 



Is one of the best selling books ever put out by the House. It 
contains a large number of illustrations, and describes the work that 
our Missionaries are doing, and the difficulties they have to contend 
with. 

Any one, after reading this book, will have a splendid idea of 

India and Her Customs. 

Also will want to do more to lift her people out of sin and degra- 
dation. 

Agents are reporting large sales of books, and if you want to 
make some money quick 

Write Us for Terms to Agents, 

Giving name of township and county wanted. Please note that we 
do not reserve territory in any other way. 

The book, in cloth binding, sells for S1.25; morocco, $2.00. 



Brethren Publishing- House, 



Elgin, Illinois. 



the: ingl-enook. 



FOR rent! 



Three choice grain and stock 
farms, near Woodstock, Mc- 
Henry County, Illinois; l6o 
acres at $3.25 per acre, 400 acres 
at $2,25 per acre, and 440 acres 
at $2 per acre. Special terms to 
reliable tenant. Will divide the 
land to suit. Agent, 

R. A. CANTERBURY, 
* 155 La Salle St. Chicago. 

2tf Mention thp IM.:I.KNnnK when win.,. 



MAKE YOUB IDIE MONEY EARN 
10 to 20 per cent per annum 

by investing now in a good, honest, 
highly successful commercial enter- 
prise, well established, earning large 
profits and paying dividends of 10 to 
20 per cent per annum, reg-ularly ana 
safely. We believe no other invest- 
ment obtainable to-day equals this 
one for large and steadily increasing 
profits, economical management and 
absolute safety. Full particulars 
free upon application. Address: 
Newcomer & Price, Mt. Morris, HI. 



4t4 



nuon llie INI^L :M'"K ' 



EUREKA GOODS! 

Are Absolutely Pure and Presh. Sold 
upon Merit and Guarantee. 

A PEW LEADERS. 

Our Pather'B Hog Cholera Cure.. .Pound 
can, 50 cents. . _,. , 

Our Mother's Poiiltry Powder and Chol- 
era Cure. Pound can, .50 cents. 

Our Mother's Healing- Ointment. 25 
cents per jar. 

Our Mother's Tooth Powder. 35 cents 

Our Mother's Electric Silverware Polish. 

25 cents per box. ^ .. „ 

Anv or all sent postpaid. Satisfac- 
tion " guaranteed or money refunded 
without a single question. 

Special terms to local and canvassing 
agents. Write to-day. 

EVREKA SPECIALTY CO., 
Box 438 Decatur, HI. 



4ti3 



Mention the INOLENOI'K 



I CAP GOODS * 



4- LARGEST ASSORTMENT 
i BEST VALUES -=e:^ 

•^ Send postal card for free samples 
X and NEW premium list. 

* It 

A. L. GARDNER. 

229 IS St., N. E., Washingiion, D. C. 

:*:ei.[ion tlif ]Nr:l.KNi'iiK when writing 4tI3<^u\v 



Incubators. 

30 Days Trial 

Johnson's Old Trusty. 

California Red Wood Cases. 
New oil saving, perfect reg- 
ulating heating system. A 
five year guarantee with every maciiine. 
Write to Johnson, the incubator man, antl find 
out about the Great $10.00 Special Offer. 

New catalO(;ue with fizn. poultry and incubntion 
records. Keep Iti^ok^ with the hens. I'lenty ol 
books. They're free. Quick shIpmeniB ■ spoclalty. 

HI. IH. JOHNSON, Clay Center, N«b. 




A HOMELY ILLUSTRATION. 



When you get a sliver in your 
finger, the sensation is anything but 
pleasant. Allow it to remain long 
enough and it will fester and give 
you a lot of trouble. Remove the 
cause and the pain will stop. 

It's the same way with your 
whole body. When your head 
aches, it is nature's message sent 
from the stomach to the brain. 
Every throb is but a click in the 
message whose letters spell " dan- 
ger — send relief." Some people, 
when they get a headache, rush to 
the drug store and swallow some 
powerful tablet or powder which 
sets the heart to thumping and the 
blood racing around the body at a 
terrific rate. Do you? Other peo- 
ple take strong purgatives which rip 
and tear through stomach and bow- 
els, leaving them irritated and sore. 
Do you ? Still other people take 
I'crnal Palmettona (formerly 
known as Vernal Saw Palmetto 
Berry Wine.) It is a sensible rem- 
edy to use. It removes the cause 
of the trouble. It helps the stom- 
ach and bowels to get rid of poi- 
sonous waste matter by stimulating 
their natural muscular action. It 
tones up and strengthens the 
nerves ; it enriches the blood and 
builds up hard, healthy tissues. 
Only one small dose a day is re- 
quired to permanently cure ail- 
ments of stomach, liver, bowels, 
heart, kidneys and blood. Try it 
before you buy. Write us for a 
jrce sample bottle. It will do you 
good. Promptly sent pospaid. 
Formula sent in every package. 
Address, Vernal Remedy Co., 419 
Seneca Building, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Sold at all druggists. " 

CAP GOODS 

We have sold cap goods by mail for nearly six 
years. Each year the volume of our business has 
increased. This steady growth is the best evi- 
dence that the thousands of sisters who are buy- 
ing goods of us are well pleased. A trial order 
will convince you that our line is unexcelled either 
in quality or price. Send for free samples and a 
booklet of testimonials. 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, Illinois. 

9tl eow M*ntipn Ihe INGLENOOK when writing. 



Howell County, So. Missouri 

Is the country of to-day forthe homeseeker. The 
best place in the U. S. for a poor man or a man 
of moderate means to get a start in life. It is a 
rolling, timbered country and no prairie. There 
are few spots in the U. S. that have better cli- 
mate — short winters, and summers not so hot as 
in the Northern States. The products are corn, 
wheat, oats, rye. timothy, clover and every- 
thing that can be raised in this latitude. It is 
also one of the coming fruit countries of the 
U. S. West Plains, the county seat, is a good, 
live town of 3,500 people, located on the main 
line of the Frisco R. R. We have lands for sale 
ranging in price to suit everyone. Would you, 
kind reader, like to have a home in this favored 
country? No malaria, etc. No colored people. 
We have just located a few Brethren people 
here and want more We want" every reader of 
this paper to write us for our pamphlet, The 
Homeseekers' Review, land list and map of the 
country. Bank and other references furnished. 
Address at once: 

SIMMONS & EPPS, 

West Plains, Mo. 



52-n 



Mention the INGLENOOK when writing 



BRETHREN'S 

Plain Clothing 

If you want 

RELIABLE GOODS. (nadC up 
In a Itrsl-class manner siTd 
•t reaionable prices, we cai» 
sailsly you 

When you buy ifom us 

GET Bhat you waflt. 

n you buy Irom yoifr 
local dealer. «.« a rule, yqi* 
TAKE what you can set. 

We always 

guarantee Satistaction 

refer lo our many pairons 
some olv horn will be lound ir» 
neaily a'ly comimimiy whde tha 
Bfcihre.. reside. Samplcsof clolh 
frr'm which wc makeourclolhing, 
measuring blank, tape line and 
»ules to. ordering will be sen on applicatiotK 
Our rules for s.-lf-mcasurement are so simple, any 
•ne can understand ihem 

We want to hear from you. 

PHILLll'SON TAILORING CO. 
180 Adams St., . Chicago, ill 

3t2 Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 





Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car. Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of \. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

A. H. HANSON. G. P. A.. CHICACO. ( 



• •4>4> 






LIFE AND ITS DUTIES. 



i!** 



' *4^**4"H>^'***^<«' 



T 



A\'e live to enjoy life and take our part in the great 
struggle for existence. In order to do our full duty 
in life's battle, it is necessary to have good health. 

If we're sick, broken down, weak and poorly, we 
cannot enjoy life, neither are we able to do the part 
required of us : we are a burden to ourselves and our 
fellow-beings. 

But nobody needs to be sick, that is, for any length 
of time. You may feel that something unusual is the 
matter with you. You may lose your strength, your 
appetite, your ambition. 

You may feel tired, worn out. dizzy and nervous. 
You may have a headache, pains all over, you may 
feel sore in the muscles, the back and kidneys. You 
know that you are sick, but still you don't know what 
ails you. These are nature's danger signals. It is 
your blood. Impure blood is the cause of most dis- 
eases of the body. It produces rheumatism, gout, la 
grippe, neuralgia, headache, kidney complaint, jaun- 
dice, backache, fevers, skin diseases and other ail- 
ments. It causes trouble for both sexes, men and 
women : for all ages, young and old. 

In order to enjoy good health, your blood must be 
in a normal condition, as blood is the life. It is the 
element of life. 

It is, therefore, important that we should know 
something about this life element and how to keep 
it pure and in a healthy state. Every movement of our 
body wears out some flesh or tissue, and these " wear- 
outs " must be repaired. The material for these bod- 
ily repairs comes from the blood. The blood builds 
up the vital organs, strengthens and regulates them 
and enables them to perform their functions regu- 
larly, according to the laws of nature. It carries the 
waste matter from the different parts of the body and 
removes it through the pores of the skin and other 
channels. If the blood is thick and sluggish, it will 
fail to perform this work ; the channels become clogged 
up and disease follows. 

'What is needed is an agent that will help nature 
remove the cause and build up the system. Nature has 
wisely provided for these emergencies. You must 
look to the vegetable kingdom for relief. In its herbs, 
roots, barks, flowers, seeds, etc., lies your salvation. 
These act without hurting your system. 

Among known remedies there is probably none 
which has met with such marked success in accom- 



plishing this as DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALI- 
ZER, a purely vegetable preparation. It does not re- 
move the cause temporarily, but attacks the evil at 
the root, destroying the evil, roots, trunk, branches 
and all. It does this because it not only purifies but 
makes new, rich red blood. It builds up, strength- 
ens and invigorates. Thousands have testified to 
its merits. 

A MINISTER WRITES. 

St. Paul, Minn., May 2nd, 1903. 
Dr. P. Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I desire to furnish you with some particulars 
regarding my case and what your Blood Vitalizer has 
t'one for me. For six years I had been a sufferer from 
La Grippe and its after effects. I seemed to grow worse 
each succeeding year. I feared I would find the same 
fate that so many other sufferers had found, especially ow- 
ing to my age. Since commencing the use of your Blood 
■Vitalizer, now over two years ago, I have not had any at- 
tack and I am enjoying better health than ever before. 
The Lord be praised! I know. Doctor, that I can con- 
.•^cientiously recommend your medicine. As often as I 
meet friends and acquaintances who are ailing I am led to 
ipeak a good word for your medicine. I am well known 
among the Germans of this country and have done mis- > 
: ionary work in St. Paul for twenty years. 

Yours truly, 

643 Oliver St. (Rev.) E. R. Irmscher. 

A GRATEFUL WOMAN. 

Lancaster, Mo.. May i8th, 1903. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I was away from home all winter visiting 
my daughter, Mrs. Duse, and while there was taken sick 
with La Grippe. I was in a bad condition. They wanted 
to send for the doctor right away but I refused to have 
him come, as I had faith in your Blood 'Vitalizer and 
Oleum. With the help of God I was entirely cured 
through these remedies. I am now seventy years old and 
feel strong enough to work again. The Lord be praised 
for your preparations. I have during my life used all 
kinds of medicine but never found anything that helps a 
person like your good medicine. May the Lord bless you. 

Respectfully yours, 

Mrs. Anna Millet. 

Who can read such testimony without the convic- 
tion that there must be '' something in it " ; something 
to the merits of this old, time-tried preparation ? 

Unlike other remedies it is not sold in drugstores, 
but to the people direct through the medium of special 
agents. For further particulars address 



DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, 111. 



■the: ingl-einook. 



1 



44 






■ ! ■ . 1 . . 1 . . 1 . ■ ; ■ . 1 . . 1 . ■ ; ■ ■ { ■ . 1 . , 1 . ■ } ■ . 1 . . | . . ^ ,|, . 1 , .1. . 1 , { , If . 1 . . 1 , . 1 . . 1 . . 1 . ,|. ,|, .1, ,1, ■ { ■ ■!. - i . . | . .i- - i . - i . » .i. -t. » a- . ;. ■ ; ■ . ! ■ ■ ; ■ » » » ■!■ ■!■ . 



• • 



The Qospel Messenger 



lA i6-Page Weeklyr 



Devoted entirely to the interests of the Brethren church 
and the cause of Christ. It contains spicy articles on 
live topics written by the ablest thinkers and writers in 
the church. If you are not familiar with it, drop us a 
card and we will take pleasure in mailing you a sample 
copy. 

Special Combination Offer. 

Gospel Messenger, one year, - - - = $i 50 
The Book • Eternal Verities," by D. L. Miller, ptfcJ" 1-25 



BOTH rOOETHER, EITHER OLD 
OR NEW SUBSCRIBERS, . . . 



$1.75 



BRETHREN PUB ISHINQ HOUSE, 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS. 



E**!* 'p 'I' 'I' s 



The Busy Man's Friend... 




Here is a book for you. The Busy 
Man's Friend is a book that we give away. 
It is not very large. You can carry it in 
your coat pocket, but it is full, frem cover 
to cover, of things that every man ought to 
know. It is made up of the odds tnd ends 
cf information in regard to everyday knowl- 
edge, such as matters of legal interest, 
measurement of buildings, and rules ef ac- 
tion generally Just what you want to 
know and don't knew where te find it. 
It is all in the Busy Man's Friend, the 
hook that we give away. Thousands and 
thousands of them have been put out to 
the entire satisfaction of those who got 
them. Have you had yours yet? If not 
here is the way you can get it: Send us the 
name of one new subscriber to the Imcle- 
NooK Magazine, remitting $i.oo with your 
order, and we will send you the book free 
of charge for your trouble and also place 
the new name on the mailing list from now 
on until the end of the year 1904. 

You may be a busy man yourself. If so, 
you want a friend of like tastet. That is 
the book, for The Busy Man's Friend con- 
tains just what you want to know without 
wasting your time looking it up in other 
places. See that you get that book as soon 
as the mails can brinf it to you. 



Brethren Publishing House, 



Elgin, Illinois. 



■ t . ; ■ . ! ■ . ! ■ ■ ! . . : ■ » 1 - ' t ' » ' t - ' t - • ! ' • ! ■ - t • ! ■ ■ ! ' * * ' V * ■ ! ■ » ♦ * * 

Free! Freel! 

Our 1903-04 64 -page 

Book and Bible... 

-^^^Catalogue 

♦ + + 

It contains many handsome cuts of 
books and Bibles and gives full descrip- 
tion and price of same In fact it is the 
largest and most complete catalogue 
ever put out by the House. Order it 
now. A postal card will bring it to you. 

Address 

Brethren Publishing House 

Elgin, Illinois. 



Would You Know 

Of some Christian endeavor in India^ 
Africa, Europe, South America, North 
America, the Islands of the Sea? 

The Missionary Visitor 



Is covering these fields in a most 
practical way, publishing that which 
is of immediate interest for its read- 
ers. Special issues have been pub- 
lished on India, China, Africa and 
Australia, South America and Japan. 
A practica and helpful 

Missionary Reading Circle Course 

conducted n each issue, with helps 
for young people's meetings, etc. 
The Visitor contains illustrations 
pertaining to the reading matter di- 
rect. Thirty-two pages monthly, 
neatly bound, with cover. Subscrip- 
tion price, 50 cents per annum. Three 
months trial, 10 cents. :: :: :: :: 



, ADDRESS . 



Brethren Publishing House, 

ELQIN, LLINOIS. 



II 



Several Handsome Premiums 



One of the things that nearly everybody wants, and certainly everybody finds occasion to use from 
time to time, is a fountain pen. Now the Inglenook has a number of Laughlin Fountain Pens, in both 
ladies' and gentlemen's style. These pens are advertised and sold by the thousands, and readers of high- 
priced magazines have often seen them advertised. They come in boxes, accompanied by an arrange- 
ment to fill them with ink; have a gold pen, and they are as fine a Fountain Pen as you will likely find 
anywhere for the money. These pens sell for one dollar, and we will make you a present of one if you get 
;two new subscribers for the Inglenook. 




Almost any Nooker can get two of his neighbors to take the Inglenook for a year and get, for his 
trouble, one of these beautiful and effective Fountain Pens. Remember, that for two new subscribers you 
will get the pen. 

' Where is the boy, or man or woman for that matter, who does not need a knife? Now, it so hap- 

pens, that we have in our possession a number of well-made pocket knives which we intend to give away 
ko our friends. Anybody who sends in one new subscriber will receive by return mail, for his trouble, this 
(substantial pocket-knife. The Inglenook editor has carried one of these around with him all over the 
pnited States, or that part of it which he has visited in the interest of the Nook family. It is a strong 





Icnife and one that will last for many a year. It is made by the Lawton Company, of Chicago, and on re- 
ceipt of one new subscriber, which any present Nooker will get, we will remember him with a pocket- 
:nife that will last him a good part of a lifetime, if he does not lose it. We do not guarantee against loss 
lut we will guarantee this knife to be a good one. This knife would sell for 50 cents in a regular store. 

Now every woman likes to have a knife just 
as well as a boy or man and she can put it 
to more usage than any man or boy would 
;ver think of doing. To provide for her we have a beautiful little pearl-handled knife with two blades, 
fist such a knife as a lady would like to have and will cost at least 75 cents if bought at a hardware store. 

! Now whoever sends in two new subscribers for the Inglenook is going to get'one of these knives. 

it is a stout, well-built knife, big enough for any purpose for which a penknife may be used, and our guar- 
ntee with this is, that after you get it if you lose it you will be sorry. 

Now, furthermore, suppose you start out to get new subscribers for the Inglenook, and nobody 
fnows how to talk it up better than those who have read it, and you are one of them. Suppose you get 
jne new subscriber, that means a knife for yourself if you happen to be of a masculine persuasion. 

j Supposing that you find it easy to get another subscriber, you have a chance to get the Fountain 

en; and if you get two more, making four in all, you can have the Ladies' Knife and the Fountain Pen, 
oth of them handy things to have about. Do the best you can, and that is the best done by beginning 
ght away. The knives and pens are ready for you and will be sent from this ofifice on receipt of the 
ibscriptions. 

:E31@;:1xx, Illixxois. 



Aibaugfh Bros., Dover & Co., 



333-335 Dearborn St., •• That's the Ptace/' 



CHICAGO, ILLi 



To Outt Friends 



The constant increase in the volume of orders that we arc receiving daily from the readers of the Inglenooi 
proves to us that we have made a friend of everyone that has patronized us during the past year. W. 

appreciate this confidence in us very much and siiall always endeavor to handle our business in a mannt- 

that will prove us worthy of the same. We guarantee every article to be exactly as represented and will replace any that are not satisfactory, or will refun,, 
the mo" ey senruMogether with transportation charges. Your orders w>U be given very careful attenfon and will be filled promptly. 1; 




Alarm Clock that Does Alarml 

The accompanying cut 
is a small illustration 
of our Parlor Alarm 
Clock. This beauti- 
ful clock is made 
with a OHflt iron case, 
gun metal finish, and 
has scroll ornamen- 
tation, as shown in the 
illustration. The 
alarm bell is skillfully 
concealed in the base 
of the clock and has an 
extremely long and 
' loud ring.making it a 
sure awakener. 
The movement is the very best and is guaran- 
teed for two years. Will run thirty hours 
without winding. If you forget to wind it at 
night it will be running the next morning. It is 
dust proof and practically indestructible. 
It is fully worth five ordinary alarms, being tlie 
most durable and substantial «"«"■ »°"*''; 
iii inches high, weighs 3'/ pounds, and »1 AA 
will be shipped by express upon receipt of ipi«WW 



Complete 

Set of 

Table 

Silverware, 

$2.55 



27 P1E«JES_6 knives, 6 forks, 6 
tablespoons, 6 teaspoons. 1 butter knife, 1 
sugar shell, 1 picklefork, of the ROGERS? 
STERLING BRAND, finest coin silver 
plate, in a fine, satin-lined, brocaded 
velvet case, exactly as shown in the small 
Illustration. This offer is genuine, and we 
guarantee satisfaction absolutely, and will re- 
turn your money if you do not find the goods 
exactly as represented. Over 200 of 'hese 
sets now in use in 'Nookers' homes, and all 
giving satisfaction. The set weighs about 7 
pounds and will be shipped by express on re- 
ceipt of $2.66 from readers of the Inglenook. 

AlDminum Salt & Pepper Shaker. 

Two pieces, each 2'A inches 
high, I'A inches in diameter, ex- 
actly as shown in the illustration, 
made of solid aluminum, 
satin finish and polished, sim- 
ilar in appearance to sterling sil- 
ver. Fitted with bevel tops, 
which are always secure, yet 
easily removed for filling. Use- 
ful and ornamental. Our spe- 
One 



clal offer to Nook readers. 

set sent postpaid with our ^A- 

catalogue tor "VW 



This Wagon Jack is made 
entirely of Iron, is easy to 
operate and is self-locking 
and self-adjusting. The 
hundreds of satisfied cus 
tomers that are now using it 
proves it to be the most per- 
fect Wagon Jack made. It 
[ weighs 8 pounds and will lift 
■ 8,000 pounds. ... 65 cents 






Table Cutlery 

In order to meet the many inquiries we have 
received from the readers of the Inclenook 
we submit the following offers of Table Cut- 
lery. This cutlery is the very best to be had 
and cannot be duplicated for the same money 
elsewhere. The forks and blades are of the 
best steel, finished in the best of workmanship, 
and are not case hardened iron as is usually 
offered. If ordered by mail send 35 cents ex- 
tra per set. 



A-38. — Single bolster, straight steel 
blade, cocobolo liandle, set of 6 Knives 
and 6 Forks, for 83 cents 

A-39.^Sanie as above, witli black 
ebony handles 99 cent" 

A-40. — Single bolster, scimeter steel 
blade, just as Illustrated, cocobolo han- 
dle, set of 6 Knives and 6 Forks, for 

96 cents 

A-41. — Same as A-40 but black ebony 
handle *l-^° 



A-42. — Double bolster, straight steel 
blade, cocobolo handle. Set 6 Knives 
and 6 Forks, for 98 cents 

A-43. — Double bolster, Scimeter steel 
blade, cocobolo handle — Just as illus- 
trated. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks, for 

$1.00 



A-44. — Single bolster, straight steel 
blade, oval swell cocobolo handle. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks, for *l-00 

A-45. — Same as above, but Scimeter 



blFidp. 



.$1.14 



A-46. — Double lap bolster, Scimeter 
blade, polished oval swell cocobolo han- 
dle. The very best to be had. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks, for $1-57 



Kitchen Knife Set 



^^^^g^g^^i^ 



A-47. — Bread Knife 1 Cake Knife and 
1 Paring Knife, made of the best cold 
rolled nickeled steel and will give satis- 
faction. The handles are firmly swaged 
to the blades and will not come loose. 
Per set of three Knives 16 cents 



Special Handkerchief Sale 

A-48. — Genuln.il 
linen 12 x 12-inc)i! 
ladies' handker-: 
chief with 1 inchi 
fancy drawi 
stitched bordei[ 
trimmed al 
around with one 
half - inch Frenc- 
Valenciennes edg 
ing. A very dainty article, as illus 

trated. Each, postpaid 10 centt 

A-49. — Ladies scalloped edge silk em 
broidered handkerchief. One come 
with a handsome floral design embrold 
ered in silk in assorted colors. Per do? 
en. postpaid 60 cent 





Comfortable Rocker 




Large and roomy; made of good stoij 
highly polished; made, in oak or el | 
guaranteed the lowest priced con-i 
chair sold. Has high back and i : 
top slat; a bargain. 

A-50. — In oak 3! 

A-51. — In elm 9'- 



Send an Orders to AlbaUgh, BfOS., Dovef & Co., 323=325 Dearborn St., Chicago, HI. 



't( 




inSl-enook: 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 



#1 




Ttie Gxape Ovovaev in Oklahoma. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



February 2, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 5, Volume VI 



the: inqlenook. 



:e: civil -ty i!^fs. cfc? s-cL^r>iy oq^ c^ia-ioago, iii. 



DON'T BUT 
Yotir Vehicle ^ 

Until you 
have looked 
over our Cata- 
logue, which 
will be Mailed 
Pree for the 
asking. 

Send for 

CATALOG 

Now. 

Best Grade 
Rubber Tires, 
Pnlly Warrant- 
ed, furnished on 
any " Equity " 
Vehicle for 
$10.00 for %- 
inch. $11.50 for 
"i-inch. 



NOTHING 



To send for our catalogue. It 
means a big saving to you when you 
buy your vehicle. Our co-operative 
plan of doing business enables us to 
quote the lowest prices. 

SUBJECT TO AFPROVAI^. 

We ship with the privilege of ex- 
amination and guarantee perfect sat- 
isfaction. We furnish Buggies, Pha- 
etons, Stanhopes, Surreys, Driving 
Wagons, Runabouts, Spring Wagons, 
Farm Wagons, — in fact everything In 
the Vehicle and Harness line. 




'^'.'^>-'^':-^zxv^'^^^^''^^^^^^^^^-^'^i^^^-^'^-'^' 



EQUITY 



AND SUPPLY CO., 



Co-operative Company 1 
Owned by Brethren. ) 



163, 15fl. 157. 159 
South Jefferson St.. 



CHICAGO, ILL 



' Falls City, Nebr. 

. S. B. Fahnestock, Sec, McPherson, Kansas. ; 

' Dear Bro : — After greetings to you, ... I am very glad to hear of the large 

enrollment at the college this year. I hope and pray that you will have a glorious and 
prosperous year. 

My eiglit children have all been at Mcrherson College, and are now all in the \ 
church. May the good Lord help us to 'hold out faithful to the end. 

I do not say it to flatter you, but say it because it is true, that the McPherson \ 
College is sending out a great influence for good in the western country, and by coming 
in contact with those of other schools I ara convinced that McPherson College excels. i 

So I bid you Godspeed. Go on in the good work. You are sowing good seed. 
Though clouds may rise and sometimes the future may look dark, yet press onward and 
upward, your work is telling. 

Yours fraternally, 
_^^_ George Peck. 

McPherson College, Kansas, tinpiiatically the people's college. Everybody is ad- 

1 mitted on the basis of character, without examination. 

The school stands for the brotherhood of man. The doors stand wide open for the 

' American youth who are destined to direct the afi'airs of the church and country. We 
educate the head, the heart and the hand. Do not attend a college for the purpose of 
learning liow to get money without earning it. Attend for the purpose of becoming 
stronger and nobler; to become more efficient in preaching and practicing the gospel of 

' service. 

; Enrollment over 330 and still they come. Wake up. Here is a chance. If you 

don't want us to knock at your door with a battering ram, write us at once. 

' We still want some students to do work for part expenses. McPherson College is 

doing well in numbers, in Christian education and in character building. 

Mcpherson college, McPherson, Kansas. ^ 



To Advertise... 



Judiciously is an art, and many make a failure 
because they lack knowledge. Advertisers will 
be helped by our advertising experts, in secur- 
ing the best possible results. 



Old Trusty »— 
^■"^^ Incubator 

GucLnLAteed Five Ye^Lrs. 30 Da.ys TriaLl. 

It is the result of a life given to the study of in- 
cubators and practical work as a manufacturer. 
None of the weaknesses of the 
old and many new improve- 
ments. A dependable hatcher. 

An oil saver. Write and yet Johnson's 
new book. It's Free and worth liav- 
ing If you ever owned or expect to own 
chickens. Write the incuhator man, 
M.M. Johnaon, Clay Center, Neb. 




FRUIT TREES! 

Complete Assortment Small Fruits, Roses 
Shrubbery, Evergreens, etc. Clean, strong, 
healthy stock, well rooted. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction. Club raisers wanted in every neigh- 
borhood. Special inducements now. Write for 
terms and prices. 48113 

E. MOHLER. Plattsbarg, Mo. 

Meotion the INGLENOOK when writinfr. 

HOMESEEKERS* EXCURSIONS TO 
THE NORTHWEST, WEST AND 
SOUTHWEST, AND COLONIST 
LOW RATES WEST. 

Via the North-Western Line. Excur- 
sion tickets at greatly reduced rates are 
on sale to the territory indicated above. 
Standard and tourist sleeping cars, free 
reclining chair cars and "the best of 
everything." For dates of sale and full 
particulars apply to agents Chicago and 
North-Western Railway. 



i,4"5"M^4"i********* ****** 



M.««.;M}M.>.;«^.iM{.^>^S.»^Mj.^«4.^M'.iM{..t. 'i- >t« ' t < • ^ •i>»^»4»»^' » t - -t- • { • • ! ■ • ! • ' t * • t '> 



25 Cents a WeeK 

For This Magnificent Set of Books 




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in ten superb volumes. Edited by Julian Hawthorne, assisted by many 
of the foremost writers and critics of the day. 

The Gist of Everything Worth Reading. 

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the earliest times down to the present era. All the chapters in fiction, humerous sketches, poetry, philoso- 
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English, and each writer's importance is made plain in Translations from Persian, Hindu. Greek, Latin and 
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It is a complete library in itself, summing up man- and delight. Brief discriptions of all the world's great 

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Ten superb volum,e9. comprising nearly 5,000 pages, embellished with more than 1.000 illustrations, / .-y ^^° ™ ^ FrfTtinn r^f 
including portraits, scenes, facsimiles, etc.. printed from large, clear type on extra quality of paper y^X'T'*fo™tnVft"nf All N^ 
and durably bound. In point of scholarly execution and attractive book making, it is superior XOX- .. * .^^-^i t -^ 
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Half Russia Edition, 1.50 " 1.50 " " 15.00 /^Aftli%Ta?s•a?[er^°eceip^"'""'^ 

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Liberal discount for cash. /.■jri^B.me 

Sent FREE for Examination. / ■/ 

Don't Ppooastlnate. Yoa must act quickly if you want to take advantage / Y i^ 

of this opportunity. When our supply is exhausted no more can be procured / -y Street 

except from agents at double the price. Sendusthe attached coupon and / Y 
a complete set will be shipped to you at once. If, upon examination you X ym 

do not find it a work worthy of your library and a wonder bargain at y X Olty 

the price asked, return it at our expense. x Y 

Address: Brethren Publishing House, //state 

ELGIN, ILLINOIS. // 



Please Remember that the First Installment Must Accompany Your Order, which 
Amount will be Refunded if the Books are not Entirely Satisfactory. 



♦ 



^4>4>****;**i"{K'"S' *<•♦•!*•> 



.Jftf^iJ^^^J^.J^J^.^iri^J'fJ'^.J^fJ'fti^'fJ'f^^ 



the: inqleinook. 



STERLING, 
COLORADO 



THE COLONY 



...ON. 



UGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



Just the place you are 
looking for. 

Come and See It. 



Do you want to buy or rent an 
irrigated farm in the 

South Platte 
Valley 

Where people are prosperous 
and contented? 



The climate guarantees health. 
Irrigation means big, sure crops. 
Denver and the great mining 
camps near by, pay good prices 
for everything you raise. 



Sterling's population is l,8oo, 
and growing. A town of churches 
and schools. No saloons or places 
•of iniquity. Three railways. Union 
Passenger Station, water works, 
electric lights, etc. 



Write us for Free Advertising 
Matter, Railroad Rates and Ex- 
cursion Dates. 



The Colorado Colony Co., 

sterling, Colorado. 



KEFERENCES-Geo. L. McDoniueh, Breth- 
ren Colonization Agent U. P. R. R., Omaha, 
Neb.; Eld. D. D, Culler, Principal Sterling Public 
School; Rev. A. W. Ross, Brethren Church, 
Sterling, Colo.; any bank or business house. 



.IN THE... 



^ti3 



HeDUoa the 1^0LKN00K when writing. 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
F. Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of 1901 
ind were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 
igo2, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19, 1902, a Brethren church was organized with a membership of 13. 
There are now 54 members. 

May II, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8, 
1903, the building shown above was completed and on July 12, 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by forty in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
they will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
ister is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all, 
IS here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies \of Cali- 
fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
forty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
day in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
lewspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

5ltl3 Mention the INP.LENOOK wnea wntln* 



Ih 



the: ingleinook. 



ARE YOU GOING 



..TO... 



...CALIFORNIA... 

Lordsburg, the Laguna De Tache 
jGrant, Tropico 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

...Uaioo Pacific Railroad... 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, 
' Utah and California Points. 



READ THIS. 



Glendora, Cal.. Jan. Sth, 1904. 
Yes. I am here, and I came here over the Union Pacific 
Route, and I am free to say that the scenery along that 
line, especially for two or three hundred miles before ar- 
riving at Sacramento, Cal., excelled anything I have ever 
seen in all my travels. It is an inspiration — view it as 
you may. Here the Bible student drinks deep from the 
fountain from whence the Bible came. The scientific 
student here enjoys a rare feast. These things show the 
handiwork of the greatest artist. A. Hutchison. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 

E. L. LOMAX, Q. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



STERLING, COLO, 

Well Adapted for Beet Sogar^ Factory. 



-*- 



sterling has a population of 1,800. 

It is the best town in northeastern Colorado. 

It is the county seat of Logan county and within one mile 
of the South Platte river. 

Sterling has three railway lines and the finest Union Pas- 
senger Station for a town of its size in the western States. 

Distance from Omaha to Sterling 430 miles. Sterling to 
Denver 140 miles. 

Sterling has a splendid water works system which fur- 
nishes water from Springdale six miles away, said to equal 
the water of Battle Creek, Mich. 

An electric light plant with arc lights on principal business 
and residence corners. 

Stone and cement- sidewalks along principal streets. 

Large brick school buildings, including County High School, 
first class teachers, free school books. 

Six churches, no saloons or dives of any kind. 

Two banks, three hotels, three lumber yards, cream sepa- 
rator station, two " up-to-date " newspapers, mercantile 
houses of all kinds carrying first class stocks of goods at rea- 
sonable prices, etc., etc. 

The principal fraternal orders are well represented and the 
Sterling Club, with 90 members, includes many of the most 
prominent business and professional men, farmers and ranch- 
ers in the county, occupying perhaps the finest quarters be- 
tween Omaha and Denver., 

An active Chamber of Commerce is pushing the develop- 
ment of Sterling and Logan county and have signed contract 
for the erection of a Beet Sugar Factory to cost over half a 
million dollars and with a capacity of 600 tons of beets per 
day. Two thousand five hundred acres were planted to sugar 
beets this year for a test crop and contracts signed for 6,000 
acres for 1904. 

nOGAN COUMTY. 

This is one of the best farming and stock raising counties 
in. the West. 

It is 48 miles long and 36 miles wide, contains 1,105,920 
acres, of which about 70,000 acres are under a perfect system 
of irrigation and the balance used for free pasture and graz- 
ing, mostly government land. 

The 70,000 acres are in the great South Platte Valley, which 
is noted for its immense crops of alfalfa, wheat, rye, oats, 
barley and other grains, vegetables, sugar beets and small 
fruits, melons, etc. 

Population of county about 6,000, mostly American. The 
German and Scandinavian as well as other nationalities are 
well represented. 

The people are intelligent, hospitable and generally prosper- 
ous, — 90 per cent are from the middle and eastern States, the 
earliest settlers were from the extreme southern States, in- 
cluding Alabama and Mississippi. 

Taxes are low, owing considerably to the large railway 
mileage. Best land and water for irrigation $30 to $50 per 
acre, according to location and improvement. — Logan County 
(Colorado) Advocate. December 24th. 1903. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Sterling, Colorado, 

OMP FABP ^'"* $2-oo, for the Round Trip First 
UllC rAllCf and Third Tuesday of Eacii Month via, 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



I IDAHO 



is the best-watered arid Statt in America. Brethren are moving there because hot winds, 
destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate It makes life 
bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler and if you have in miad a change 
for the general improvemeat in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, 
we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that 
is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many qaestions to answer and many conditions to investigate. 

Oor years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad tares t« 
investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Tak^ advantage of them and ser for your- 
self. Selecting a new tiiime is Imp selecting a wile — v<>ii want tn dii your uwti chiKwini;. 



f 



Settlers' Oge°way Rates rom March I to April 30, 1904. 

FROM To Pocatello, Huntington. 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa, etc. 

Chicago, S30 00 $30 50 

St. Louis 26 00 27 50 

Peoria 2800 2850 

Kansas City and Omaha, 20 00 22 50 

Sioux City, 22 90 25 40 

St. Paul and Minneapolis 22 go 25 40 




NCH, IDAHO. 



1^ Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
^ Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. 



Fine 



Nampa, Idaho. 

I came to Idaho two years ago from the best part of eastern Kansas. 1 had done no work for a year oa ac- [ 

coant of poor health. One year here brought me all right and this year I fanned and made more money from ^ 

80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my potatoes were ahead, aiaking 600 ^ 

bushels per acre. JosHUA James. ^ 



^ S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 

X J- "• QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



D. E. BURLEY, 

G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R„ [ 

Salt Lake aty. Utah. ^- 



HeDtion the INril.KNnoK wii«ii wntin» 



'^f(y(fy(f>(fVfy(fVfy(fVfVf^'f\(f>(>vfVfy(f>'fVfVfVfy(fy(fVfV9y(fyf9y(fy(f\(f>(fy(f>(t> 



Lii 
tit 



felNSbENSOK 



Vol. VI. 



February 2. 1904. 



No. 5. 



DISCOVERY. 



When the bugler morn shall wind his horn, 

And we wake to the wild to be. 
Shall we open our eyes on the selfsame skies 

And stare at the selfsame sea? 
O new, new day! though you bring no stay 

To the strain of the sameness grim, 
\'ou are new. new, new — new through and through, 

And strange as a lawless dream. 

Will the driftwood float by the lonely boat 

.A.nd our prisoner hearts unbar. 
As it tells of the strand of an unseen land 

That lies not far, not far? 
■O new, new hope! O sweep and scope 

Of the glad, unlying sea! 
You are new. new — new with the promise true 

Of the dreamland isles to" be. 

Shall the lookout call from the foretop tall, 

"Land, land!" with a maddened scream, 
.^nd the crew in glee from the taffrail see 

Where the island palm-trees dream? 
New heart, new eyes! For the morning skies 

Are a-chant with their green and gold! 
New, new, new, new — new through and through! 

New, new till the dawn is old! 

— Richard Hovey. 
^ ♦ ♦ 

JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



Character is your best capital. 



We get out of life just what zve put into it. 
Is a Chinese laundry ticket a mark of irony? 



Headstrongness and zveakmindedness are twins. 

* 
Wayward people generally fall by the wayside. 



A lazy man always tries to work somebody else. 

-i boost is often worth a whole lot of sympathy. 

Laugh and grozv fat does not apply to the hungry 
man. 



_ Cold truths arc not food for the soul. 

4* 

No one else can solve your riddle, work it out your- 
self. 

* 

Nature rarely gives a man a big heart and lots of 
money. 

* 

Brevity is the soul of ivit but sometimes the poverty 
of ideas. 

* 

As a rule the world takes the side of the man who 
has money. 

It is economical wives zvho make the bargain count- 
ers possible. 

It makes less- difference being homely than being 
a poor cook. 

* 

The man who gets a compliment is not particular 
about its grammar. 

Smiling and saying nothing is often nothing but 
another zvay of .lying. 

♦ 

No man has a narrozver look than he zvho is alzvavs 
looking out for himself. 

* 

Nearly everybody is trying to come out on top, the 
baldheaded man always does. 

* 

When a boy has a zvoman for a champion, if he is 
zvise, he trusts her to any length. 

* 
Vou cannot tell anything about the good a man 
is doing by the groans he makes over it. 

When anybody is especially anxious to know your 
secret yon be specially careful not to divulge it. 

* 

With money you can conzince the world that you 
have brains, which may or may not be the case. 



98 



THE INGLEINOOK, 



WRITING. 



Perhaps very few people have ever thought of the 
history of writing, how it came to be discovered, and 
the vicissitudes it passed through, before it attained 
its present state of comparative perfection. The Nook 
uses the modifying word, cottiparative, for the next 
thousand years will doubtless bring out something 
as much in advance of what is past, as we are now 
ahead of the ancients. 

Perhaps the most stupendous feat the human mind 
ever achieved was the invention of the art of writing. 
It was not the invention of any single genius. It 
was a slow development, marking the course of hu- 
man progress over thousands — perhaps tens of thou- 
sands — of years. It began with such crude picture 
making as that of the Mexicans and Egyptians ; it 
continued with such strange signs — each standing for 
a s}'llable — as those of the Babylonians and Assyrians : 
it reached an epochal stage in such an alphabet as that 
of the Phoenicians, Greeks and Etruscans. The de- 
velopment still went on and on until hundreds of di- 
verse alphabets had been elaborated, as widely dif- 
ferent in form as the flowing script of the Arab, the 
pointed letters of Thibet, the stiff, formal characters 
of a Roman epitaph, and the scrawl of a Michelan- 
gelo, or Michelagnolo, as he chose to sign himself. 
Indeed, until the piinting press came, these characters 
were forever changing. No generation failed to make 
some slight change in the chirography it had inherited. 

Consider, for example, the Mexican picture writ- 
ing, with its company of strange, archaic figures. It 
represents the very earliest type of writing — simply 
the making of pictures to which a certain symbolic 
meaning has been attached. Every people that ever 
learned of its own accord to write began in some such 
style as this. Drawing, it seems, is a far more ele- 
mentary art than writing. It has often been said that 
whoever can learn to write can learn to draw. It ap- 
pears, however, that this is only a half truth ; the full 
truth is that countless peoples from the time of the 
cave dwellers on have been able to draw who had not 
even an idea of writing. A relatively high plane of 
civilization had to be reached before even the crudest 
picture writing became possible. At least five differ- 
ent peoples appear to have reached this plane of de- 
velopment independently. These were the Mexican 
Indians, the Chinese, the Hittites, the Babylonians and 
the Egyptians. Perhaps the inhabitants of Crete, 
whose writing has now come to light in the excava- 
tions on that island, were a sixth ; there may be others 
whose records are forever lost. But the ones just 
mentioned are those whose writings have been pre- 
served, mostly beneath the ruins of ancient cities and 
in recent times exhumed and studied. 

Of the various types of picture writing that of the 
Egyptians, as illustrated in the picture showing the 



god .Atmoo, was much the most elaborately developed.. 
It was indeed a strangely complex thing. Some of its 
pictures stand for the objects represented, some for ab- 
stract ideas, and some represent signs, and some are 
tacked on at the end of words to give a clearer idea of 
what is meant. , It is very much like the rebus puzzle 
in the children's column of an ordinary newspaper. 
Suppose, for example, one were to write out the word 
"courageous" by picturing (i) a nondescript dog to 
stand for the syllable " cur ; " then (2) the figure of an 
old man for "age," then- (3) for the final syllable, 
were to write the letters " u s," adding a picture of two 
people to make sure, and then were to add a picture 
of a lion as the symbol of the word " courageous " as 
a whole. This would be following the method of the 
old Egyptian writing. It was a curiously complex 
method, but it continued in vogue for at least 4,000- 
or 5,000 years among a people who represented, for 
most of that period, the highest civilization in the- 
world. The Egyptians wrote what was virtually their 
bible, the famous Book of the Dead, in this script. 
They used a papyrus roll to receive the writing, but 
they were also fond of making inscriptions on columns 
and on the walls of temples. 

The Greeks, unable to read this writing, supposed it 
to be altogether of a religious character, and hence 
gave it the name " hieroglyphic," that is to say, holy 
carving. For some 2,000 years after the Roman con- 
quest of Egypt no one in the world was able to read 
these hieroglyphics. But the scholarship of the Nine- 
teenth century ferreted out their secret, and it was dis- 
covered that Egyptian writing was by no means con- 
fined to religious topics. The builders of the Sphinx 
and the pyramids had a varied literature, not unlike 
that of modern nations. The oldest short stories in 
existence, for example, are written in this Egyptian 
script, and at a time not so far removed from the 
time of the pyramids. 

The story of the countless Babylonian and Assyri- 
an books of every type, and of the business documents, 
including bills of sale, leases, notes and the like, can- 
not be more than referred to. Most readers have 
heard of the so-called " Creation " and " Deluge " tab- 
lets, which contain accounts somewhat similar to those 
in our own Bible. These business documents and 
books consist for the most part of tables of clav, hard- 
ened and made imperishable by drying in the sun or 
by baking. The library of a single king might con- 
tain thousands of these strange books. Some of the 
tablets from old Babylonia are ascribed to a period 
as remote as 4500 B. C. 

A strange story is associated with the statue of the 
Egyptian King Rameses the Great, a colossal portrait 
which, as seated, measures sixty-five feet in height, 
and guards a temple hewn out of the solid rock at Abu 
Simbel in Nubia. Travelers of the middle of the Nine- 



the: ingleinook. 



99 



teenth century, visiting this temple, complained that 
" Cockney tourists and Yankee travelers had smeared 
their vulgar names on the very foreheads of the Egyp- 
tian deities " here shown. Since then it has been dis- 
covered that these- were not the first desecrators, for 
on the knee of one of the statues there is an inscription 
in archaic Greek written by two soldiers who were 
with the army of King Psammitichus and therefore 
dating from the earlv part of the Seventh century B. 
C. 

But what is vandalism in one age may seem very 
different in another, and to-day scholars have reason 
to thank the Greek soldiers for their desecration, since 
this brief inscription shows the Greek alphabet in the 
oldest form known. Until this was discovered many 
scholars believed that the Greeks were not able to write 
imtil a much later period than the Seventh century. 
It was traditional that the poems of Homer were passed 
down by word of mouth, generation after generation. 
It was even doubted if such a thing as a written copy 
of Homer existed in all Greece at the beginning of the 
Peloponesian war, though this followed the celebrated 
" Age of Pericles," when art was at its greatest height. 
But the irkscription on the statue of Rameses makes 
such a supposition absurd, for if mere mercenary sol- 
diers could scrawl written records with facility, no one 
would be likely to question that the scholars of their 
time could write books. 

The plan of folding books and thus making them 
much more convenient to read, as well as gaining space 
by writing on both sides of the material, originated in 
the early Middle Ages. Curiosuly enough, such widely 
different nations as the Mexican Indians, on the one 
hand, and the Batak people of Sumatra, on the other, 
adopted the same expedient, folding their books into 
almost the modern style, except that they did not cut 
the leaves, and so still wrote on only one side of the 
crude paper or strip of bark of which their books were 
made. 

♦ ♦ ^•* 

HOW INVALIDS ARE CARED FOR IN UP-TO- 
DATE HOTELS. 



Chronic invalids are no longer excluded from the 
j constantly growing proportions of the city population 
: which finds hotel life convenient and agreeable. Here- 
tofore the difficulty has been mainly that the hotel 
menu, with its heavy, rich dishes, has been wholly 
unsuited to persons in poor health. 

Lately, however, hotel managers, especially in Lon- 
don, have found it profitable to provide a special 
menu for invalid guests. As a consequence, many 
prominent and well-paying guests are found among 
those who formerly were compelled to keep up a 
household of their own in order to carry out their 
doctor's instructions respecting diet. 



The hotel invalid menu contains a larj^e variety of 
dishes that are nourishing and easily digested, such as 
broths, vegetable soups, thick and thin, calf's foot jelly 
and light, solid dishes, such as souPfles and simple pud- 
dings. 

In hotels the tendency is to overeat, the )iortions 
served being evidently measured by the capacity of a 
laboring man in robust health. The invalid menu cor- 
rects this tendency while paying attention to the se- 
lection and preparation of food. It thus contains 
small portions of roasts, ordinary vegetables, steaks, 
chops, game, etc. 

The innovation is commended by medical men, who 
observe the growing tendency all over the world to 




HE BUILT HIMSKLF A COTTAGE IN OKLAHOMA. 

abandon the private house, with its cares and often 
incompetent service, for the great hotel managed with 
mathematical precision. 

.}. .J. .J. 

BIRDS CHANGE THEIR NATURE. 



The fact that day birds become nocturnal at mi- 
gration time, uttering notes used on no other occasion 
in the year, that they fly at a speed beyond their ordi- 
nary powers and at heights beyond their ordinary 
haunts, leads Dr. Gatke to believe that they possess 
in their powers of flight and soaring some principle 
not employed on any other occasion and hitherto not 
taken into account by naturalists. 

♦ <♦ <* 

Miss Grace Philips, of Wolcott, Wayne County, 
New York, has the distinction of being the only wom- 
an mail carrier in the State of New York. She is 
nineteen years old, and every week day she rides 25 
miles up hill and down dale. It is said that when 
Miss Philips made her first appearance as a postman 
in Butler Center the excitement was quite unpre- 
cedented. She had hoped to be able to ride her 25 
miles out on horseback, but it was found impossible 
with the rearulation mail carrier's hag". 



lOO 



the: inglenook. 



ADAPTATION IN PLANTS. 



This is a subject of intense interest while it may 
not appear so. yet if you read it through you will 
have something to think about. Everybody is di- 
rectly interested in plants because without them there 
could be no animal life on the globe. It is a re- 
markable fact, or a fact, whether remarkable or not. 
A plant which grows in one locality often does bet- 
ter when it is removed to another and there culti- 
vated, and, through the selection of seed, it sometimes 
becomes adapted to its surroundings. 

In the matter of garden vegetables the Inglenook 
has no doubt but that here and there over the country 
is some old woman with a little garden who has been 
doing her gardening all her life, saving the seeds of the 
plants she grew. She has kept this up until she has a 
fixed type that might be of great advantage to the 
world at large if it was only known. 

While it is necessary in the transplanting of any 
plant to at first observe as nearly as possible its origi- 
nal conditions of soil, shade, etc., yet it very frequent- 
ly happens that there is an after improvement. In 
fact every vegetable that grows in our garden is ut- 
terly unlike its wild parents. There is perhaps one 
exception to this rule and that is in the case of the as- 
paragus. Asparagus has been cultivated for thou- 
sands of years, yet it is a matter of doubt among 
botanists whether there is more than one varietv 
It is true that there are different sizes due to fertil- 
izers and cultivation, and that sort of thing, but for all 
they are simply asparagus plants. This is not true of 
the other vegetables as there are many different kinds 
of potatoes, cabbages, tqmatoes, and the like. 

What we want to speak especially about in this 
article is the effort that is being made to secure plants 
adapted to regions other than where they originated. 
In the northern part of Europe, and especially in Fin- 
land and Sweden, for some years back there have been 
a series of crop failures, and the government has done 
much to find cereals and vegetables that will stand their 
climate, and which will either ripen before the frost 
or which will not be affected by it. The proposition is 
to erect a greenhouse and plant therein the hardiest 
varieties of fruits, vegetables, grains, etc., and then 
submit them to the various degrees of temperature by 
opening the building and letting in the outside air, and 
other climatic conditions, to see just how much they 
will stand. We will suppose now that out of a thou- 
sand of plants of wheat a half dozen or even one 
may be found that will stand a certain amount of 
frost and cold. What is to be said about wheat is 
equally true of all other plants and vegetables. As to 
the outcome of it, all anyone can predict is that it 
is within the bounds of possibility that they will suc- 
ceed in developing a new and more adaptable list of 
grains, fruits, and vegetables for their country. 



It is a scientific fact that, while it is rather difficult 
to elevate the plant to higher ranks of usefulness, it 
goes down hill with a wonderful rapidity. You may 
plant the finest crop of tomato seed and secure for 
yourself a crop of splendid tomatoes. If some are al- 
lowed to seed the ground, there will come up thrifty 
plants the next season, but when it is once attempted to 
set them out in the majority of cases the tomatoes will 
l)e small, round, and show a manifest reversion of the 
type to the little tomato, and that is a type of all 
of them. About three years of this seeding and all 
marked strains of the plant are gone. This is why he 
who would have early vegetables should secure his 
seed from a northern climate, and he need not think, 
that, although he has established a new vegetable so far 
as its time of ripening is concerned, he will be able to 
carry it out farther than the second year. The third 
year the seed will adapt itself to its surroundings 
and be just about the same as the common varieties. 

The Nookman once got some corn from the Amazon 
valley in South .\merica and planted the seed. The 
stalks grew to about fifteen feet in height without the 
sign of the ear or silk forming. The season was not 
long enough and there was no corn. Durinf the same 
year he planted the seed of some potatoes that had 
been raised n^ar Sitka, Alaska. The way these po- 
tatoes grew and ripened was something wonderful. 
They were not of the best quality but made up in earli- 
ness what was lacking. The second year, some of 
them having been saved for seed, the potatoes were 
only medium early but had gained somewhat in qual- 
ity. The third year they were ordinary potatoes, hav- 
ing lost all traces of their .\laskan parentage. The 
lesson of all this is that, in order to have a type that is 
permanent, you must have adaptable climatic con- 
ditions, soil and surrotmdings. So if any Inglenook 
reader would have early vegetables of any character, he 
should send north to the extreme limit of their growth 
for seed that has been successfully grown there for 
several years, and they should insist upon no specialties 
or novelties being sent in answer to the inquiry. 

To give another illustration of this situation. The 
writer once sent to the botanical garden at Colombo, 
Cevlon, for seeds of rare plants. In the course of 
time along the seeds came, together with descriptions 
of their marked peculiarities, which rendered them 
valuable in that country. The great majority of them 
were common weed pests of the United States, chief 
among which was the cocklebur, a native pest of 
.Vmerica but wonderfully prized in Ceylon. This in- 
cident I mention in order that the Nature Study people 
who want to order seeds from the Arctics, to advise 
the man who sends them that what they want are not 
the specialities or novelties, Init those of plants that 
have become adapted to that country. He who would 
have early vegetables must get his seed from regions 



THE INGLENOOK. 



lOI 



farther north than where he hves. Should he get his 
seed from southern regions they will not ripen at all. 
Louisiana green corn is no good around Elgin, while 
Canadian sweet corn is the earliest that can be grown 
down on the edge of the gulf. 

The fact, however, that we want to impress on the 
clubs is this ; that it will only hold out for a year or 
two. when, b}- the adaptability of the plants, they will 
settle down to their immediate surroundings. .About 
nine-tenths of this situation is what is called the ." run- 
ning out " of seed. People get a good potato, plant 
it, and when ripe save the runts for seed. These 
smallest ones are planted and when thev get the 
kind they planted they say that the seed has " run out." 
The facts are that intelligence has not been run in, 
in the first place. They should not expect anything 
else, no more than they would expect a country boy 
turned loose in the city to retain his rustic appear- 
ance and usual health. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE WISHBONE. 



Ch.^rles J- Maynard, a well-known man of science, 
told the members of the Boston Scientific society at a 
recent meeting the reasons for the existence of what is 
known as the wishbone in fowls. To begin with, the 

.- speaker deplored the lack of knowledge that exists re- 
garding the structure of the birds internally. " For 
example," said he, " it is doubtful if five men in the 
United States know much about the anatomy of the 
common robin. The ornithologists know all about ex- 
ternal characters, the color, arrangement and number of 
feathers, methods of flight, habits and the like, but 
exceedingly little about the interiors of the birds they 
study." Classifications have been made largely by 
■externals, when study of the anatomy must be a very 
important part of the subject. He had himself begun 
with the anatomy, and more than twenty vears ago, in 
some of his publications, he dared to separate the owls 
from the hawks. They had been placed in the same 
order, and have so remained till very recently. Now 
others have separated them even more widely than Mr. 
Maynard did so long ago. His deductions were from 

' a knowledge of the anatomy. 

The wishbone is called by scientists the furcula and 
is in reality the union of what are in man the two separ- 
ate collar bones. These in the birds receive the brunt 
of the strokes of the wing that turn the creature in its 
flight. Few realize the strength of stroke of the bird's 
wing. It is said that a swan has been known to break 
a man's leg by a blow of its wings, and in like manner 
the wing-beatings of the largest birds are dangerous 
if they strike the head or face. If, therefore, a large 
iDird is in the habit of making sudden turns to right 
or left in its flight, it must be fitted with a wishbone 
■competent to withstand the great strain of the wine- 



stroke on one side, with no special action on the other 
side. For this reason we find in the eagle, and like 
birds of quickly-turning flight, a furcula that is a per- 
fect Roman arch, widely at variance with the Gothic 
arch which is the shape of the wishbone of our com- 
mon fowls. The eagle's furcula is a solid rounded 
arch, everywhere equally strong, and not developing 
those points of weakness that make our sport of break- 
ing the wishbone possible. 

♦ *:•• ♦ 

TIME KEEPING. 



The Western Union Telegraph company receives 
about $1,000,000 a year for keeping 70,000 clocks cor- 
rect, charging for so doing $15 per year for each clock. 
These are set at noon each day by an automatic ar- 
rangement in each electric equipment, which responds 
to the beat of the sidereal clock in the naval observa- 
tory when its hands point to 12 and let the time cur- 
rent go. A few minutes before this hour business 




WESTERN PROGRESS : TEN YEARS AGO WHERE THE 
TOWN IS NOW WAS A BARE FIELD. 

over the Western Union wires is suspended and opera- 
tors throughout the country put their instruments in 
shape to form an unbroken circuit from the observa- 
tory to every place where ticks a clock to be electri- 
cally influenced. There is a hush over all the great 
telegraphic system. Then the time ball strikes and 
instantly the time message flashes over the wires. 

♦ * * 

I NEVER think of the silence of God without think- 
ing how great is the delight which comes when any 
man discovers that God really has been answering him 
all the time when he thought that his prayers were all 
unheard. That must be one of the most exquisite 
joys of heaven. — Phillips Brooks. 

* * * 

'■ To love is better than to be great, it is better than 
to be refined, it is better than to be wise. Love takes 
precedence of all prophecy, of every kind of knowl- 
edge and of the gift of tongues; love is higher than 
hope or faith and is the very royalty of God." 



102 



the: inglenook. 



t-»^>^»<$» ^ « * t * " 1 * ^ ' t * 4** ? »^»^>^j*^ 



rv V v v 1 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over the country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
takmg the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



"%* V V 'I* 'J' *i* *** V V*' 



M> ^ » * ■* ^* ► t " ' I ' > t ' ' t ' ' * ' ' I * ' t * * t * * $"$ **$**$* * t * * t * * h " t **! 



SEAL HOMES. 



The seal, though capable of remaining under water 
for a long time, is compelled to breathe fresh air, and 
therefore the house in which it lives is built in such 
a manner as to give it an abundance of ozone. The 
seal cannot live for any great length of time without 
air, says St. Nicholas. As winter spreads sheets of 
ice over the fast freezing arctic sea the seal breaks 
a hole in the ice over the water where it lives. This 
hole it is very careful to keep open all winter long, 
breaking away each new crust as it forms, so that no 
matter how thick the ice becomes the animal always 
linds there a breathing place and a passage to the sur- 
face of the ice above where it can get fresh air and 
take a nap, for it does not sleep in the water. Then 
again, although the seal can exist for a time out of wa- 
ter, it has to seek its food in the sea, so that without 
both land (or ice) and water it would not survive the 
arctic winter. 

How, after once leaving its breathing hole in search 
of fish upon which it feeds, the seal can find its way 
in the dark under the ice, a yard in thickness, and 
spreading over many miles, back to its hole no one 
knows, but it is not the less certain that when it needs 
the air it swims as straight to its breathing place as 
a bird could fiy through the air to its nest. 

When the seal is about to build her house she first 
makes the breathing hole larger and then, by means of 
her strong claws and flippers, or forepaws. scoops out 
the snow, taking it down with her through the ice im- 
til she has made a domelike apartment of the same 
shape, though not the same size, as that built by the 
Eskimo. Unlike the huts built by man. however, it 
cannot be seen from without, for above it stretches 
the long slope of untrodden snow, and the baby seal, 
for whose comfort the house was built, and its mother 
are safe from any foes that cannot find where the 
house is by the sense of smell. 

The house, however, is sometimes discovered by 
the great polar bear, who, when his nose has told him 
that he is upon the top of the seal house, leaps in the 
air and, bringing the feet together, comes down with 
all his great weight, breaking through the roof and 
catching the baby seal before it can get away. Hook- 
ing one of his sharp claws into its little fiipper, the 
bear then does a very cruel thing. He lets the cub 



down the breathing hole, so as to lead the anxious 
mother to come to it as it struggles in the water. 
When she does so he slowly draws it up again and, as 
she follows it, strikes and secures her with the claws 
of his other foot. 

Very few of these seal houses are found out,' how- 
ever, either by men or beasts of prey, and they last 
until the feeble arctic summer partly melts the snow 
that covered and concealed them. Of course, by this 
time the baby seal has grown large and strong enough 
to take care of itself and lives a great wav from its 
place of birth. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

THE MUSKRAT'S HOME. 



The house that the muskrat builds for the protection 
of himself and his family from stress of weather, is 
strictly a utilitarian structure. The entrance, dug with 
great and persistent toil from the very bottom of the 
bank, for the better discouragement of the muskrat's 
deadliest enem\-, the mink, rmis inward for nearly 
two feet and then upward through the natural soil to 
a point where the shore is dry land at the average level 
of water. Over this exit, which is dry at the time of 
the building, the muskrat raises his house. 

The house is a seemingly careless, roughly rounded 
heap of grass roots, long water weeds, lily roots and 
stems and mud, with a few sticks woven into the foun- 
dation. The site is cunningly chosen, so that the roots 
and stems of alders or other trees give it secure anchor- 
age, and the whole structure, for all its apparent loose- 
ness, is so well compacted as to be secure against the 
sweep of the spring freshets. About six feet in diarn- 
eter at its base, it rises about the same distance from 
the foundation, a rude, sedge-thatched dam, of which 
something more thaii three feet may show itself above 
the ice. 

To the unobservant eye the muskrat house in the al- 
ders might look like a mass of drift in which the rank 
water grass had -taken root. But within the clumsy 
pit is a shapely, warm chamber, lined with the softest 
grasses. From one side of this chamber the burrow 
slants down to another and much larger chamber, the 
floor of which, at high water, may be partly flooded. 
From this chamber lead down two burrows, one, the 
main passage, opening frankly in the channel of the 
creek and the other, longer and more devious, termi- 



the: ingleinook. 



103 



nating in a narrow and cunningly concealed exit be- 
hind a submerged root. Tliis passage is little used 
and is intended chiefly as a way of escape, 
in case of an extreme emergency, such as, for ex- 
ample, the invasion of a particularly enterprising mink, 
by way of the main water gate. 

The muskrat is no match for the snake-swift, blood- 
thirsty mink except in the one accomplishment of hold- 
ing his breath under water, and a mink must be very 
ravenous or quite mad with the blood lust to dare the 
deep water gate and the long subaqueous passage to 
the muskrat's citadel at seasons of average high water. 
In times of drouth, however, when the entrance is 
nearlv uncovered and the water goes but a little way 
up the dark tunnels, the mink will often glide in, 
slaughter the garrison and occupy the well-built citadel. 

OWLS AND THEIR ENEMIES. 



As owls are capable of supporting the light of the 
ay, or, at least, of then seeing and readily avoiding 
leir danger, they shut themselves up during the day 

some obscure retreat. If they be seen out of these 
retreats in the daytime they may be considered as hav- 
ing lost their way, as having by some accident been 
thrown into the midst of their enemies and surrounded 
with danger. In this distress they are obliged to take 
: shelter in the first tree or hedge that offers till the re- 
turning darkness once more supplies them with a bet- 
ter plan of the country. But it too often happens 
that, with all their precautions to conceal themselves, 
they are spied out by other birds and are sure to receive 
no mercy. Tlie blackbird, the thrush, the jay, the 
hunting and the redbreast all come in file and employ 
their little arts of insult and abuse. The smallest, the 
feeblest and the most contemptible of this unfortunate 
bird's enemies are then the first to injure and torment 
him. They increase their cries and turbulence around 
him, flap him with their wings and are ready to show 
their courage to be great, as they are sensible that 
their danger is but small. 

The unfortunate owl, not knowing where to attack 
or whence to fly, patiently sits and suflfers all their in- 
sults. Astonished and dizzy, he only replies to their 
mockeries by awkward and ridiculous gestures, by 
turning his head and rolling his eyes with an air of 
■stupidity. It sometimes happens that the little birds 
pursue their insults with the same imprudent zeal with 
which the owl pursued his depredations — they hunt 
him the whole day, but when night returns he makes 
"his pursuers pay dear for their former sports ; nor is a 
man always an unconcerned spectator. The bird 
catchers have got an art of counterfeiting the cry of the 
owl exactly, and, having before limed the branches of 
a hedge, they sit unseen and give the call. At this all 
the little birds flock to the place where they expect 



to find their well-known enemy, but instead of finding 
their stupid antagonist they are stuck fast to the hedge 
themselves. This sport must be put into practice an 
hour before nightfall in order to succeed, for if it is 
put off till after, those birds which but' a few minutes 
sooner came to provoke their enemy will then fly from 
him with as much terror as they just before showed 
indolence. 

THE CARRIER PIGEON. 



The headquarters of the homing pigeon industry is 
in Philadelphia. As early as the thirteenth century 
these pigeons were used for short distance racing. 
The homing or carrier piegon is now at its highest de- 
velopment. They are what their name implies, '' hom- 
ers," and when taken away, will return to the place 
where they began to fly. The greatest distance, to 
1902, covered by one of the birds, is 1,324 miles, from 
Denver to Grafton, W. Va. The fastest time made up 
to that time was 100 miles in one hour and twenty- 
nine minutes, or almost one and one-eighth miles a 
minute. This record was made in Essex county, N. 
J. It is still a mooted question as to what faculty these 
birds possess, by the exercise of which they know the 
direction in which home lies, after being carried long 
distances in closed cages. They carried messages 
from the besieged city of Ladysmith, in the South Af- 
rican war. They have been used in several of the 
international yacht races to carry news to land. 



THE MOCKING BIRD SITS MOANING. 



During the period of dog days, say old residents of 
Florida, the mocking bird's song is never heard. Pri- 
or to that time he is almost an incessant singer from 
morning until night. Even on moonlight nights one 
seldom awakes but the soft, sweet warble of this bird 
can be heard. During the forty days of extremely hot 
weather naught but a low chirp is heard. He moans 
about in a subdued manner, as though he were 
ashamed of his ability to sing ; indeed, he seems to 
have divested himself of his accustomed frivolous, 
flirtv ways, and one may imagine he is doing penance 
for his past hilarity. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

WHY LOBSTERS CHANGE THEIR SHELLS. 



Several times a year the lobsters shed their shells 
and each time the shell is shed the lobster increases in 
size. During the shedding season they go into the 
coves with soft muddy bottom and conceal themselves 
in the mud. A new shell of sufficient thickness to pro- 
tect their bodies is grown in about a month or six 
weeks. ^^ ^.^ ^.^ 

The flavor of milk may be largely influenced by the 
food of the animals. 



IC-l 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



INSECT EGGS. 



AccoRDiiNG to Dr. Richard Kerr, some insects 
la)' oval eggs, others cylindrical, others spheri- 
cal. Some eggs are like Grecian water bot- 
tles, others have crowns on the top. Some have rims, 
grooves, and projecting points of ornamentation. In 
some the lines around the exterior entwine in beautiful 
order, in others lines and flutings prevail, as if they 
had just come from the hands of a skillful engraver. 

A fine lace covering envelops the surfaces of several 
insects' eggs. Many are tinted and colored, while 
others display an irridescence surpassing that of the ear 
shell haliotis. Even the eggs of the parasites of 
birds are more splendid than the eggs of the birds 
themselves. 

jN'Iicroscopic objects, such as eggs of insects, many 
of which range between the fiftieth and the hundredth 
part of an inch in diameter, cannot appear, either to 
our judgment or to unassisted vision, to possess any 
surface on which it is possible to display any orna- 
mentation. 

If superficial space be allowed we can understand 
the presence and the possibility of decorative beauty ; 
but when objects are so small that several of them, 
if tied together, would readily fall through the eye 
of a fine needle, we are naturally astonished and puz- 
zled to find them ornamentally embossed and beauti- 
fied in the highest degree. 

Each kind of butterfly or other insect has its own 
special form of egg, so distinctly marked that an en- 
tomologist should be able to name the insect by merely 
seeing its egg. 

The eggs of certain butterflies are so wonderfully 
ornamented that in point of design they stand pre- 
eminently before the eggs of birds. The egg shells 
of butterflies consist of a tough gelatinous substance 
which resists fairly strong acids. They differ from 
those of birds in that they contain no carbonate of 
lime. There is another circumstance connected with 
their history which deserves especial notice. The vi- 
tality of the eggs of butterflies and moths is not im- 
paired by exposure to extreme cold. 

They may be frozen in a block of ice and in due 
time they are hatched as if nothing unusual had oc- 
curred. Were it otherwise, a severe winter would 
bring about the destruction and extinction of hosts of 
these creatures. 

.Mthough these eggs are microscopic, yet the same 
protecting care is bestowed upon them that is ex- 
tended to the eggs of the guillemots of the cliff for 
their protection, though in a different manner. This 
bird lays but one egg in the season, and as it is placed 
on a narrow ledge of rock at a considerable height, if 
shaped like a hen's egg. it would roll off, and the 
guillemots would soon become extinct ; but these eggs 



are tapered to a point, so that when they are disturbed 
by the birds themselves, or by the wind, they rotate 
around the narrow end and cannot wabble oft'. In- 
stances of protecting care like this are continually 
making themselves apparent, and we are not justified 
in attributing all to the work of a blind chance. Hosts 
of tiny creatures, glittering in the sunshine, were born 
this morning at sunrise. .\t noon they will attain to 
middle life, at simset they will die of old age. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
WHY MANKIND LOVE DOGS. 



Man loves the dog, but how much more ought he 
to love it if he considered, in the infle.xible harmony 
of the laws of nature, the sole exception, which is that 
love of a being that succeeds in piercing, in order to 
draw closer to us, the partitions, everywhere else im- 
permeable, that separate the species ! We are alone, 
absolutel}- alone, on this chance planet, and amid all 
the forms of life that surround us not one, excepting 
the dog, has made an alliance with us. A few crea- 
tures fear us, most are unaware of us and not one 
loves us. In the world of plants we have dumb and 
motionless slaves, but they serve us in spite of them- 
selves. They simply endure our laws and our yoke. 
They are impotent prisoners, victims incapable of es- 
caping, but silently rebellious, and so soon as we lose 
sight of them they hasten to betray us and return to 
iheir former wild and mischievous liberty. The rose 
and the corn, had they wings, would fly at our ap- 
proach like the birds. 

.\mong the animals we number a few servants who 
have submitted only through indifference, cowardice 
or stupidity ; the uncertain and craven horse, who 
responds only to pain and is attached to nothing : the 
passive and dejected ass, who stays with us only be- 
cause he knows not what to do nor where to go, but 
who nevertheless, under the cudgel and the pack sad- 
dle, retains the idea that lurks behind his ears ; the 
cow and the ox, happy so long as they are eating and 
docile because for centuries they have not had a 
thought of their own : the affrighted sheep, who know 
no other master than terror; the hen, wlio is faithful 
to the poultry yard because she finds more maize and 
wheat there than in the neighborhood forest. I do 
not speak of the cat, to whom we are nothing more 
than a too large and uneatable prey, the ferocious cat, 
whose sidelong contempt tolerates us only as encum- 
bering parasites in our own homes. She, at least, 
curses us in her mysterious heart, but all the others 
live beside us, as they might live beside a rock or a 
<rec. They do not love us, do not know us, scarcely 
notice us. They are unaware of our life, our death, 
our departure, our return, our sadness, our joy, our 
smile. They do not even hear the sound of our voice, 
as soon as it no longer threatens them, and when thev 



the: ingl-einook. 



lo: 



look at us it is with that distrustful bewilderment of 
the horse, in whose eyes still hovers the infatuation 
of the elk or gazelle that sees us for the first time, 
or with the dull stupor of the ruminants, who look 
upon us as a momentary and useless accident of the 
pasture. 

•> ♦ •$■• 

THE WOOD DUCK. 



Habit.vt. — From Florida, Louisiana, Colorado and 
California north to Xew Brunswick, Manitoba and 
British Columbia. Winters from Massachusetts, Ohio, 
Indiana, Missouri and Texas south to the West In- 
dies and Mexico. 

Wood duck inhabit the principal woodland districts 
of the United States, arriving in the eastern and north- 
ern portion of this country shortly after May i. They 
usually nest in the hollow of a tree, the aperture be- 
ing twenty-five to forty feet from the ground. Wilson 
describes a nest of the wood duck found in the middle 
of May as follows : " The tree was twenty yards from 
water on a declivity ; in its hollow and broken top, about 
six feet down, lying on soft, decayed wood, were thir- 
teen eggs covered with down. This tree had been 
repeatedly occupied." The wood duck is also beauti- 
fully described in the new book entitled, " The Water- 
fowl Family," by L. C. Sanford and others. 

The young are carried to the ground by the old 
bird in her bill. They feed on insects, water larvae 
or tender buds. 

STUDY THEM; DON'T KILL! 



If, instead of shooting the birds, scotching the 
snake, smashing the beetle and pinching the tiny life 
out of the butterfly, we were to watch any one of 
these creatures on a summer day the day would pass 
like an hour, so packed with exciting experience it 
would seem. Through what mysterious coverts of the 
woodland, into what a haunted underworld of tunneled 
banks and hidden ditches and secret passages the snake 
would show us the way, and we should have strange 
hearts if, as we thus watched it through the mysterious 
day, we did not find our dislike of the clever little 
creature dying away and even changing into a deep 
tenderness toward the small, self-reliant life, so lonely 
a speck of existence in so vast a world. — Success. 

♦ * * 
THE GRIZZLY. 



That the grizzl)^, as a rule, has no fear of man 
goes without saying. As information to those who 
know the animal, this, and the further statement that 
he generally attacks on sight, would be about as super- 
fluous as to say that fire scorches or that dynamite 
explodes. Greater in strength and size than the Af- 



rican lion or the Bengal tiger, and with a temper 
usually at the boiling point, the grizzly may truly be 
classed as the most formidable of the beasts of prey. 
Undisputed lord of American beasts, his special ani- 
mosity to man is probably due to that mysterious thing 
called instinct — about which we know so little — which 
teaches him that it is from man only that he has to 
fear for his supremacy. 

As, however, in mundane affairs there seems to be 
no rule without its exception, even the grizzly, formid- 
able and fearless as he is, has his moods of timidity, 
sometimes of apparent indifference to the human pres- 
ence, and sometimes of real fright. 

♦ 4* <• 
HOW A BIG SNAKE EATS. 



Take the case of a big snake, one twenty feet long. 
.\fter some weeks of enforced hunger, when a rabbit 
is placed in the cage, the scene begins. If you are at 
all finicky about such things better not get the picture 
in your mind. Take the Nook's word for it. 

First the snake takes a steady look at the rabbit, 
and the rabbit looks at the snake, making no effort 
to get away. Then with a quick motion the snake 
catches the bunnie, and with one coil kills it. Then 
it, the snake, starts the rabbit down, head foremost. 
The huge python holds its head up in the air, and 
by a system of muscular contractions it edges the poor 
rabbit down, and the last that is seen of it are the 
straight out hind legs of the luckless animal. It takes 
ten minutes, or a little over. It isn't a pleasant sight 
by any means. 

♦ ♦ *> 

THE BIRD MONOPOLIST. 



As is generally known, the cuckoo lays its eggs in 
the nests of other birds, leaving them to be hatched 
and the young cuckoos reared by their foster parents. 
The young cuckoo throws the other birds out of the 
nest and gets all the care itself. After murdering its 
foster brothers and sisters in the most deliberate and 
callous way it is thenceforth tended with the greatest 
devotion. Long after it has left the nest the great 
bird, apparently big enough to get its own living and. 
man}' times larger than its foster parents, is followed 
about and fed by them with the same care as when in 
the nest. 

4> 4» * 

A DACHSHUND has been described as a dog having 
four legs that ought to have six legs ; also, as a dog and 
a half long and only half a dog high. 

♦J* ♦ * 

The hottest place on earth is Bohreim, on an island 
in the Persian gulf, which' has a mean annual temper- 
ature of ninety-nine degrees. 



io6 



the: incbl-enook. 



mllCLtNOOK. 

A. Weekly Nla^azine 



...PUBLISHED BY.. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, LLL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
cepUnce or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 

Brethren Publishing House, 
(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South State St.. ELGIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



" The memory of a kindly word long, long gone by. 
The fragrance of a fading flower, sent lovingly, 
The gleaming of a sudden smile or sudden tear, 
The warmer pressure of the hand, the tone of cheer, 
The hush that means 'I cannot speak, but I have heard!' 
The note that only bears a verse from God's own word: 
Such minor things we hardly count as ministry. 
The givers deeming they have shown scant sympathy; 
But when the heart is overwrought — O, who can tell 
The power of little things like these to make it well?" 

^ **♦ ■^ 

FORGETTING. 



If the statement were to be made that we never 
forget anything we see or hear, it would be hailed with 
an exclamation of exception. Yet there is nothing 
truer than that we never forget anything. It is true 
that we may regard as utterly lost, some fact that we 
would call up and clothe with words, but, in the ex- 
perience of everybody, how often does the lost name, 
or the mislaid fact, hid perhaps, in some remote cor- 
ner of our minds, return unbidden to us after a long 
absence, to come again uncalled for? We say that we 
have forgotten, but better we might say that we are 
unable to voice it, and that it refuses to come out of 
memorv's storehouse at our call. 



What we do not know we do not have real trouble 
with. Yet with all the certainty that there are things 
which are unprofitable, at least, if not entirely ob- 
jectionable, there are many of us who willfully take on 
the erratic and the undesirable, even going far out of 
our way to see some sight most unpleasant. Think of 
the crowd that would attend a public hanging, to see 



the life choked out of a fellow-mortal! What is the 
reason why people will assemble around a place where 
a murder has been committed, or the scene of a dread- 
ful accident? Even little children are taken to such 
a place, to remember something that will return to 
vex them when their elders shall have passed away. 



No, none of us can hang pictures on memory's wall 
without having to look on them occasionally. No- 
body can adorn his mind with the frivolous or the ob- 
jectionable and not have it thrust on his attention 
when he 'would forget if he could. They may wander 
far afield, but, like chickens, they come back again to 
the old home to roost. What is worse, what is once 
ours in this way cannot be disposed of if we would do 
so. They thrust themselves on us when we would 
that they should remain away. They will not stay 
away. Who is there who has not some mental visit- 
ors that come without being bidden to every feast? 
Who of us has not had to entertain the unclean comer 
into the guest chambers of his soul ? 



There is a wonderful lesson in all this if we would 
only heed it at the period of our lives when we most 
need it, — our early youth. The real fact is that at this 
most impressible time of our lives, for some 
unexplained reason we most desire to see the bad and 
the worst of life. Nobody has ever succeeded in di- 
vesting the youth of his desire to see the forbidden and 

the undesirable. He takes it in, and what he does not 

... 
know, and cannot be made to know, carries it with ; 

him while he lives. He cannot shake himself loose 

from it, and he cannot forget. 



The remedy for not forgetting the undesirable is, of 
course, in not having anything undesirable to forget. 
If we sought out the best there is in this life, and 
ignored the rest it would be all the better for us. If, 
when we were in a large city, we visited its art galleries 
and let the slums go, it would be hanging pictures in 
the soul, and if we heard the singer, listened to the 
song of the birds and the hum of bees, it would be 
preferable to the discordant notes of life. The pity 
of it all is, we do not recognize this until we have 
in our inexperiertce, taken on so much that were bet- 
ter left out of our lives. The lesson is, of course, to 
note the fact for the future, and, as far as we can in 
fluence others, see to it that only the best is set be 

fore them. . . ^ 

^* •J, ^ 

RUSSIA AND JAPAN. 



Once Russia and Japan get into grips, which willi 
win out? It is hard to tell. Russia may be beatenl 
and yet not lose in the long run. Japan, if whipped, 
will lose much more in the way of actual fact, and alsOj 
of prestige. 

The spectacle is unique and will furnish reading, a.s 



the: ingleinook 



107 



well as information, for the whole world. There is no 
material comparison between the two nations. Russia 
is, big, raw-boned and savage. Japan is little, wiry 
and its savagery has a thin veneer of recent civiliza- 
tion. When at war it will be a case of bull and bull 
terrier. It is expecting too much to hope that Japan 
will hurt Russia. badly, even though the little brown 
man whips the big man. 

The fight is over territory. Japan and China are 
related in many ways. Japan wants an outlet for an 
over-crowded population at home. Russia is for ex- 
tension of territory and both want the same place, 
Corea, and hence the fight. If Russia wins out part 
of China will go to the Bear, and Japan will contract 
visibly. In that event England, France and Germany 
will have interests that compel attention. If Japan 
whips Russia and forms a coalition with China then 
the whole world may look out for some history mak- 
ing and map changing. 

The immediate efifect of the war will be to make 
good markets for us, and the Pacific coast city will 
have a busy time of it, shipping food supplies and 
selling both parties at our own prices'. 

The moral aspects are clear. Here are some mil- 
lions of men, entire strangers, who will hate and kill 
one another, for they know not what, and the outcome 
will be of no benefit to them, as' individuals, no matter 
how it goes, but that is war, and war was defined by 
one of our own soldiers. 

* ♦ ♦ 
PINCUSHION PEOPLE. 

Readers have seen what the useful article known 
as a pincushion is, and they know that when it gets 
full of pins and needles it is not a thing to handle 
incautiously. And there are pincushion people in the 
world, people who have to be handled " just so," or 
there is trouble. 

All of us have seen the man or woman who is con- 
tinually on the lookout for direct or implied insult. 
If by any remote possibility what is said or done can 
be twisted into an innuendo or fling against them they 
take it that way. It is a most serious defect of char- 
acter, for people generally find that on which they are 
looking and he who is looking for a chance to be in- 
sulted can find ready material to his hand in the 
ordinary amenities of life. 

It is always either a serious reflection on one's per- 
sonal character, or his home surroundings, that he is 
■ thin-skinned. There are people who would think they 
were being ridiculed if a neighbor's rooster crowed 
when they passed. It is the weaker person, and the 
consciously deficient ones who are always on the look- 
out for people thrusting discreditable things upon them. 
When a grown man or woman retains this defect in 
later life they do become ridiculous, and the very 



imaginary fear that possessed them becomes an ac- 
tuality. 

The thing for pincushion people to do is to accommo- 
date themselves more and more in easy action to the 
world in which their lot is cast. As a rule the vast ma- 
jority of the world intend no slight and mean to convey 
no innuendo. What they do in that way is more or 
less a personal defect of themselves and it is not wise 
for anyone to take umbrage at what they say or do. 

4* ♦ ♦ 
DON'T DO IT. 



The particular don't we have in mind is what is 
known as "' rushing into print." Don't do it. The 
temptation among many people, especially those who 
know least of newspapers, is strong to air their griev- 
ances before the public. Don't do it. 

Here are one or two good reasons. Suppose some- 
body has lied about you, and you feel that you must 
" write a piece for the papers " about it. Don't do it 
because it is a lie and needs no refutation. And now 
suppose, to use an Irish way of putting it, suppose the 
lie is true enough, but you think you can bluff it out. 
Don't go into print over it, and one good reason for 
it is in the fact that while a hundred people may know 
it now, a thousand will know it when you advertise it. 
That ought to settle it with most people but there is 
still a number who will not listen to any sort of reason 
and who will persist in inflicting on the public the story 
of something in which they have no earthly interest. 

Right or wrong, whatever the personal wrong may 
be, don't make it worse by printing it as news. There 
are a very few things that need denial. An illustra- 
tion of one or two is in the publication of a marriage 
notice when there has been none, or the unintentional 
mixing of names in print. Here a paragraph of denial 
is admissible, but to air a local neighborhood case, 
never think of it. You'll get the worst of it if you try 
it. Don't do it. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

There are glimpses of heaven granted us by every 
act or thought or word which raises us above our- 
selves — which makes us think less of ourselves and 
more of others — which has taught us of something 
higher and truer than we have in our own hearts. — 
Dean Stanley. 

♦ ♦ 4> 

You find yourself refreshed by the presence of 
cheerful people : why not make earnest efforts to con- 
fer that pleasure on others? You will find half the 
battle is gained if you will never allow yourself to say 
anything gloomy. — Lydia M. Child. 
*s* ^ ^>s* 

In this world it is not what we fake up, but what 
we give up, that makes us rich. — Henry Ward Beech- 
er. 



io8 



THI 



INGLENOOK. 



WHAT'S THE NEWS? 



The Chinese are finding homes in Japan. 



The Mikado has seized all private railroads in Japan. 

Gen. Lee's birthday was observed throughout the 
South. 

Robbers in New York stole imported silks valued 
at $1 1,000. 

Where is the man who hankered after an old-fash- 
ioned winter? 

The government is considering a plan of endow- 
ing mining schools. 

The Governor of Mississippi has declared that negro 
education, is a curse. 

The worst snow blockade in the year in New York 
State was last week. 



• John Mitchell has again been chosen president of the 
United Mine Workers. 

Quite a number of train wrecks have been the re- 
sult of the past cold snap. 

From 5,000 to 10,000 people daily visit the world's 
fair grounds at St. Louis. 

China suggests mediation in the case of the rupture 
between Japan and Russia. 

The National Prohibition convention will meet at 
Indianapolis, Ind., June 29. 

Mrs. Roosevelt is learning Indian bead work. Her 
daughter is quite proficient. 

Miss Watson, of New York, gives the Orthopedic 
hospital of that city $250,000. 

An elevator cage fell 1,500 feet in a Colorado mine, 
killing fifteen men occupying it. 

Lewis Ticker, of Minnesota, died of heart disease 
while sleighriding with a lot of girls. 

The United States Steel Corporation at Shelby, Ohio, 
has sustained a loss by fire of $3,000,000. 

King Peter, of Servia, is having troubles of his 
own with his people. They want to kill him. 



Chicago policemen have organized for protection 
against charges made by criminals against them. 

Lake Forest University, near Chicago, has had a 
fund given it to endow a cooking class. The papers 
are ridiculing it, but all the same it is a step in the 
right direction. 



The Chicago theaters are to open again soon, in 
the face of the past fire horror. 



The owners of the ill-fated Iroquois theater at Chi- 
cago will donate the site for a memorial to the dead. 



An immense steam pipe exploded at Johnstown, Pa., 
with disastrous results to fifteen men taken out of the 
debris. 

It is said that St. Louis hotel keepers intend to put 
up prices at the Democratic Convention to be held in 
that city. 

There are only 22,000 miles of railroad track in all 
England, yet 230 companies divide this small mileage 
among them. 

The requirements of the Chicago city council are 
said to be so stringent in the matter of public safety, 
as to close all the theaters. 



Down in Mexico City, remembering the Iroquois 
theater disaster, they have installed asbestos curtains 
in the places of anuisement. 



If Japan and Russia desire an object lesson in war 
let them send delegates to some western town with 
rural towns in a county seat fight. 



Kniperor Menelek, of Abyssinia, is sending two 
lions as a present to President Roosevelt by a United 
States gunboat. 

W. R. Llearst, owner of several city papers, is mak- 
mg a fight for the democratic nomination for President 
of the L^nited States. 



They are trying to close the saloons and dance halls 
in Chicago at midnight. It would be well if none of 
them ever opened again. 



One hundred and ninety coal miners were entombed 
alive at Hardwick, sixteen 
All are believed to be dead. 



ive at Hardwick, sixteen miles from Pittsburg, Pa. 



The coroner's jury to inquire into the causes of the 
Iroquois theater fire in Chicago have held the mayor 
and seven others to the grand jury. 



Simeon M. Ayres, of New York, summoned his 
friends by telephone to his room at a hotel and when 
thev came he was dead from poison. 



There has been an exceptionally cold snap around 
Elgin. Many fires in the larger cities always result 
from a cold spell. Over-firing causes it. 



A minister of the Presbyterian church assembly at 
.\'ew York, made a gesture and threw his arm out of 
joint. He had to be taken to a hospital where it was 
pulled into place again. 



the: inglenook. 



109 



Pennsylvania women's clubs are warring against 
Keed Smoot's admission to the Senate of the United 
States', in which body he represents Utah. 



There is some talk of Pojie Pius X retiring from 
his eminent position. He thinks the trouble is too 
great for him to bear. 



Yoi! may think it was cold at your place, but at 
Pohejam Dam. near Grand Rapids, it was fifty-seven 
Ijelow zero by the government thermometer. 



A gentleman in Chicago whose wife is seeking a 
divorce from him has been diligently searching for the 
man who invented work in order that he may kill 
him. 

The railroads have recommended one fare for the 
round trip to the big show at St. Lxjuis, with stop- 
over privileges, though this may be changed here- 
after. 

Theater managers are confronted by the puzzling 
question as to where to find a perfectly fireproof paint. 
Anv Nooker who can solve this problem is sure of a 
fortune. 

The armv appropriation bill has passed the House 
carrying approximately $75,000,000. Thus it will be 
seen that the game of war is a costly one even in 
inaction. 



Down in Kansas City a frozen-up stove exploded 
when fire was made in it. and it seriously injured 
some of the people about it. Frozen water pipes was 
the cause. 

It is reported by the St. Louis papers 'that the 
World's Fair, to be held at that city, will not be open 
on Sunday, and this will be approved by all Chris- 
tian people. 

The manuscript of Milton's " Paradise Lost " was 
offered for sale at auction in London and $23,750 was 
bid for it when it was withdrawn, as the reserve price 
•was $25,000. 

Sarah C. Sdiafler, a pretty school-teacher, of Bed- 
ford, Ind., was found murdered in a peculiarly cruel 
way. There are several clues, but no known facts 
at this writing. 

Mrs. John C. Crowley, nineteen years old, of Kansas, 
playfully snapped an " unloaded " revolver at her 
head and lived twenty miijutes thereafter. She leaves 
a small child, she having been married lately. 



Some Chicago laundrymen are charging by the 
pound. They offer to do all sorts of family washing 
for five cents a pound, with a minimum of seven pounds 
for one person. This price holds for a miscellaneous 
lot of clothes. 

From St. Paul comes the story that fifty-seven de- 
grees below zero was the reading of the thermometer 
during the cold spell in the northwest. Thirteen train 
loads of sheep and cattle were frozen to death on the 
Canadian railroad. 



.A casket containing the remains of John Smithson, 
founder of the Smithsonian Institute at Washington, 
D. C, who died at Genoa, Italy, now reposes at the 
Institution which he founded. 



The sixteen-months-old baby of Airs. Schmidt, of La- 
crosse, Wis., was put in the oven of a stove bv a 
five-year-old sister to warm it while the mother 
chopped wood. It was burned to a crisp when dis- 
covered. 

After sitting in the window of a Jersey City piano 
store and playing for twenty-four hours and five min- 
utes. Prof. J. M. Waterbury turned away from the in- 
strument, announcing that he was unable to proceed 
any farther. 

Eight students of Ann Arbor, Michigan, are taking 
small, but continued doses of poison to show the ef- 
fects on the human system. The experiment will run 
some months. The name of the poison is at present 
kept a secret. 

Henry Schoenberg dropped into a doctor's office in 
Minneapolis and while waiting picked his teeth with 
an ivory point. It was charged with vaccine virus 
and " took." Tie is being fed now with a glass tube, 
and will recover. 



Prof. Lewis Sugarman, an oculist of Little Falls, 
N. Y., has scarcely passed a day without taking a 
swim in the Mohawk river, no matter how cold the 
atmosphere or how thick the ice that had to be broken. 
He says that his health has been much improved. 



A new disease has been unearthed at the University 
of Chicago. It is called " mind wandering." The 
prime symptom of the disease is the lack of ability to 
concentrate the mind on any subject. It may be a 
new disease for Chicago but lots of people have had 
the trouble long ago. 

Whitaker Wright, the London promoter of gigantic 
frauds, was tried in the courts and sentenced to seven 
years servitude. Inside of an hour after the sentence 
he was dead. Whether he took his life by poison or 
whether it came by its natural course, will not be 
known until a post mortem examination is held. 



Lonnie Lawrence Dennis, ten years old, has been 
preaching since he was a little over three. He is a 
colored boy with Indian, French and German blood 
in his veins. He talked at the Academy of Music, in 
Kansas City, to a crowd of about three hundred peo- 
ple and is reported to have given expression to ideas 
that one would not expect from a boy so young. 



no 



THE ingl_e:nook. 



ANENT THE LOBSTER. 



About forty or fifty years ago the United States 
government began to consider its fish worthy of study, 
and a man known as Prof. F. S. Baird was appointed 
fish commissioner. From this beginning came fleets 
of steamers and sailing craft, stations for the propa- 
gation of fish and campaigns against enemies of good 
fish. Then one day, many years later, it occurred to 
some man on the Maine coast that lobsters were be- 
coming scarce and the same kindly government's fish 
men planned to grow lobsters and to prevent ruthless 
slaughter of those then living. European waters give 
up lobsters, but only the American kind is the one 
making the best food. To grow lobsters is more of a 
task than to grow corn and results are incomparably 
more uncertain. 

In the harbor at Gloucester, Mass., the fish commis- 
sion has one of its stations, and for several months 
each year it is a lobster incubator and nursery. In 
producing incubators, eggs are a necessary adjunct, so 
a man from the island in Gloucester harbor was sent 
out with a lobster boat. The lobster carries its eggs 
attached to the swimming legs and under the tail, ten 
or eleven months after they are produced. The num- 
ber of eggs varies from 3,000 to 80,000 on a lobster. 
All the egg-bearing lobsters taken were turned over to 
the fish commission man. Returning to the fish com- 
mission station the eggs were removed and placed in a 
McDonald jar, an incubator for lobsters. In one of 
these glass jars a half million of the little green eggs 
may be placed and in season one hundred jars are at 
work in the station at once — enough lobsters for every- 
body if they would only live. The eggs are laid in 
June, July and August and about eleven months after 
are hatched. Three weeks is the time the mass of 
green globules stay in the jars and then they begin 
to be alive — lobsters about one-fourth of an inch long. 
The claws have not come yet, but the eyes ! The eyes 
seem to be bigger than the bodies. 

From the time the eggs went into the jars sea water 
was forced through constantly, so that the eggs never 
had a quiet moment and never a drop of old water. 
When the first lobsters appear it is more than necessary 
to keep the water circulating. Let it stop and the 
young would gather in a mass at the bottom of the 
jar, suffocating each other. Those that might escape 
sufifocation would have to begin to fight for life at 
once, for the lobsters, even the little quarter-inch ones, 
are cannibals by nature. A young lobster family will 
eat itself in a pretty short time if left alone. 

When they begin to appear in the jars they come 
so fast that there is haste to get them to sea. There 
they are dumped overboard with best wishes for the 
permanency of the lobster indvistry. They are taken 
far out from the harbors and the homes of small fish ; 
the big fish do not trouble themselves about quarter- 



inch lobsters. How many of the millions the fish 
commission hatches and throws into the sea every sea- 
son grow into lobsters of commercial value, no one 
pretends to know. There is no way to learn whether 
they survive the first few hours in the deep sea ; the 
fish commission can learn the results of its eflforts in 
the inland waters, but in the ocean it is largely a mat- 
ter of guessing about fate. 

But for the sake of argument suppose that one of the 
incubator lobsters thrived. For the first four months 
he is very busy shedding shells. He will lie on one 
side, burst the shell and draw his whole body through 
the opening. Five minutes is sufficient time for the 
process, and then comes the growth of a new shell. 
As the lobster grows older, the intervals of moulting 
increase until he acquires a new shell about once in 
two years. In the older days he requires about two 
months to gain a new shell, and in that period they 
are known as soft shells, or rubber shells. When a 
fisherman catches a soft shell lobster he throws him 
back into the water. 

When the young one has moulted six or eight times 
he has acquired the appearance and the ways and hab- 
its of a full-grown lobster and he leaves the surface 
for the depths or bottom of the sea to live. Clams and 
fish are the principal diet, but he is somewhat of a scav- 
enger and does not overlook dead animals. As he gets 
to be a year or two old, he gains in length about an 
inch every time he sheds his shell and when he is 
about nine inches long he belongs to anybody that may 
find him along the coast of Maine. In Maine it is 
unlawful to have in possession a lobster under nine 
inches long. 

When he reaches that size the lobster should avoid 
anything having the appearance of a small chick- 
en coop. These traps, or " pots," as they call 
them, are made of lath with a funnel shaped open- 
ing at either end. Refuse fish are placed inside, the 
pots are weighted with stones and sunk, and when a 
lobster goes in for the fish he stays, unless he is small 
enough to slip out between the slats. The location of 
each pot is marked by a buoy, generally a piece of 
wood bearing distinctive colors. The lobsters in the 
pot belong to the man who placed the trap, and there 
are laws in the lobster States to punish the man who 
raises another's trap. 

The owners of the pots inspect them from small 
boats, generally dories, and the catch is kept in float- 
ing " cars " moored near the shore. A " car " is simp- 
ly an oversized chicken coop, very strongly construct- 
ed. At regular intervals lobster boats visit the spots 
containing cars and then there is sharp dealing be- 
tween lobster catchers and lobster dealer. The boat 
carries them to canneries and packers. A lobster with 
few scars of battle and wearing all the claws a well 
regulated lobster should have will probably be packed 



I 



the: incsuenook. 



Ill 



into a barrel of ice and land in Boston or New York 
'ir any other place where live lobsters are in demand. 
If he is scarred and battered, with claws long ago 
the food of a brother lobster, he will probably be 
chopped into bits and canned. The ultimate fate of 
the canned lobster may be the salad of the church din- 
ner, far from his home. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

HOW LEAP YEAR CAME TO BE. 



Press dispatches recently have called attention to 
ihe fact that numerous unfortunate children who were 
born on February 29, 1896, will observe their first 
birthday anniversary this year. The reason, of course, 
is that owing to a peculiarity of the Gregorian calendar, 
1900 was not a leap year, although it is divisible by 
four. Had the children been natives of Russia they 
would have been provided with a 29th of February 
four A^ears ago, for the Czar's subjects still live under 
the dispensation established by Julius Caesar. 

It was determined long before the Christian era 
that about 365 days constituted a year. The shadow 
cast by a tree at noon, as everybody knows, grows long- 
er during the summer and autumn until it attains its 
maximum length on December 21. Then it short- 
ens until June 21, when it reaches its minimum. The 
ancient astronomers kept track of the time that elapsed 
between two maximum noon shadows and so ascer- 
tained the approximate length of the year. Later it 
was discovered that the estimates were too short by 
about a quarter of a day and that as a consequence 
the calendar was falling into confusion. The loss of a 
■day every four years would mean the omission of 
nearly a month in a century. 

When Julius Csesar rose to power the autumn 
■ months were coming in the summer. To put an end to 
this disorder, upon the advice of the Egyptian astron- 
omer, Sosigenes, he decreed that every fourth year 
• should consist of 366 days. Then in order to restore 
the spring equinox to March 25, its date under one of 
the early kings, he prolonged the current year to 445 
days. This was called " the year of confusion." The 
"first year of the Julian era began on January i, of the 
forty-sixth year before the birth of Christ. It may be 
observed in passing, for the benefit of those persons 
who have difficulty in recalling the number of days 
in the various months, that Csesar had planned to make 
the calendar as simple as possible by decreeing that 
every alternate month beginning with January should 
"have thirty-one days, and that the others should have 
thirty, excepting February, which was to have twenty- 
nine in ordinary years and thirty in leap years. The 
present irregular arrangement was adopted to gratify 
the vanity of Augustus. Under the Julian calendar 
"the month named for him, August, had only thirty 
■days. He gave it an extra day which he took from 
February. The length of the succeeding months was 



ihen altered to avoid the massing of three with thirty- 
one days each. 

Sosigenes, however, was not exactly correct, for the 
length of the year is really 365 days, five hours, forty- 
eight minutes and forty-six seconds. So the Julian 
calendar itself slowly became involved in discrepancies. 
By 1582 the spring equinox had fallen back to March 
II. Therefore Pope Gregory XHI undertook a second 
reformation by suppressing ten days. Since it was 
known that the error in the Julian calendar amounted 
to three days in 400 years, the Pope ordered the extra 
day of February to be omitted from all centenary 
years excepting those that are multiples of 400. Thus 
1600 was a leap year, but 1700, 1800 and 1900 were 
not, although those numbers are divisible by 4. Eng- 
land adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, but it has 



to 





Mii^ 




-i- "VJt^frW^ 


■ 


rgi 


1 


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*"°ijj 


I 


H 


H 


HP^ > ■ ■ ■ 








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1 



TO SHOW EASTERN NOOKERS THE LAY OF THE PRAIRIE. 

not yet been adopted in Russia. In that empire the 
last three centenary years have been regarded as leap 
years. Hence the original ten days' divergence between 
the old style and the new has now increased to thir- 
teen. 

-^ -^ ^ 

NOT TO BE OUTDONE. 



A NOTE of family pride was struck in the conversa- 
tion between three small boys the other day. The 
parts played by their respective grandfathers in the 
civil war were being depicted by two of the boys in 
vivid colors. The career of each, it seemed, had been 
halted by confinement in southern prisons, and it was 
on the latter fact that the lads laid particular stress. 
The third youth, unable to match these recitals with 
any military achievement of his own forbears, pre- 
served an envious silence for a while, and then, not 
to be outdone, said disparagingly : " What, that's not 
so much. My Uncle Bill was in jail a long time and 
he was never in the army at all." 
* 4> * 

The largest and most comprehensive natures are 
generally the most cheerful, the most loving, the most 
hopeful, the most trustful. It is the wise man, of 
large vision, who is the quickest to discern the moral 
sunshine gleaming through the darkest cloud. — Select- 
ed. 



112 



THE ING!_E:N00K. 



COSTLY FIRING. 



It may never have occurred to the Nooker who 
reads that the cost of firing a big gun is something 
out of the ordinary. The facts are a good lesson on 
the money eating capacity of war. 

One million three hundred and thirty-six thousand 
dollars for target practice ! That is the somewhat as- 
tonishing sum that Uncle Sam is asked to appropriate 
to train the man behind the naval guns for the ensuing 
year. Moreover, it is estimated that when the ships 
now in course of construction are added to the fleet, 
this sum will have to be more than doubled — that is, 
the annual coat of ammunition for target practice in 
the navy will be $2,690,000. Is this an indication of 
extravagance or growth? 

First, we must take into consideration the enormous 
growth of the United States navy. In 1897, just six 
years ago, the number of enlisted men was limited to 
7,500. Now the number is 28,000, and if you add to 
that the 6,750 marines, who come in on the matter of 
target practice, you have a total of 34,750 — nearly five 
times as many as we had before the outbreak of the 
Spanish war. The ships and guns have increased in 
practically the same ratio, so that to-day we have none 
too many men to man them. The naval register of the 
present year gives the names of 312 vessels, large and 
small. Although this list includes tugs, some of which 
are not armed, and forty-two vessels which are still 
under process of construction, yet it will readily be 
seen that to keep the 34,750 men in good practice at the 
guns means the expenditure of an enormous sum of 
money, for modern naval gun practice is exceedingly 
expensive. It is necessary, however, for in the ability 
of the men to shoot rapidly and accurately lies the 
practical value of the navy. 

To fire a 13-inch gun, the largest type used on our 
warships, costs for powder and shell just about $500. 
Four times a year the men are exercised in big gun 
practice, with regulation charges, each man of the 
gun's crew firing four shots at these trials. There are 
seven men in a gun's crew on these guns. Now, if 
you multiply seven by four, that by four again, then 
multiply by the number of 13-inch guns in the navy 
and take into consideration that everv two shots cost 
$1,000, it is not difficult to see how fast the big guns 
burn up the appropriation. But the number of largest 
guns is not a tithe of the 8 and 6-inch guns, in ad- 
dition to the 5-inch, the 4-inch, the 6-pounders and 
I -pounders, whose number is legion, and on which the 
practice is just as important and assiduous as on the 
big ones. Luckily the cost of these is less. To fire a 
4-inch common shell costs $17, a 6-pounder $3.86, a 
I -pounder $1.14. Every ship has a battery of Colt 
automatic machine guns which fire cartridges in a 
stream fed from a belt at the rate of 400 a minute. 



Four times a year each man fires two belts on one 
of these gxms. It takes a little over two minutes and 
it costs about $7 a belt. 

That is the regulation gun practice with actual am- 
nuinition which has been in vogue of late years, but 
recently another and important custom has been add- 
ed. That is the record training for the title of gtin 
captain, which carries with it certain honor and $2 
a month more pay. Any man is eligible for this, be 
he landsman, seaman, gunner or cook, and all are ex- 
pected to take part in the competition. The title car- 
ries with it no change of duties. The cook may be 
a gun captain and he must cook still, but the title and 
the $2 extra are eagerly sought. Moreover, a good 
record of this sort puts a man in the way of possible 
promotion. 

Even this amount of actual practice with full 
charges, however, is not enough to make the men 
what they are to-day, the best naval gunners in the 
world. Another and inexpensive method is used for 
daily work at the guns. It is a modification of what 
we used to call " subcaliber " practice. This used to 
be done with a rifle barrel inserted in the bore of the 
big gun, aiming and firing the big gun at a properly 
reduced target near by, but using only the rifle charge. 
This method has been modified again by the late Lieu- 
tenant Morris of the Charlestown navy yard, with 
\vhat is known as the " Morris tube." The rifle is a 
22-Flobert, rigged just over the big gun. There is a 
frame at the muzzle and a box arrangement to catch 
the bullet. The target is a very small one, just be- 
yond the muzzle, and so arranged that an ingenious 
mechanism makes this target roll and pitch as a ship 
would in actual warfare. The men take their daily 
round of shots on mechanism, pointing and training 
the big gun as at a regular target. The expense is 
very slight and the results are excellent. A careful 
record of each man's shooting is kept, and when it 
reaches a certain degree of accuracy he is in training 
for the real gun practice, which, if he is successful, 
will give him the much-coveted title of gun captain 
and that extra $2 a month. 

When one takes into consideration the size and 
weight of a thirteen-inch gun it seems impossible that 
such records could be actually made, but the test has 
proved it. The thirteen-inch gun mounted on the 
.\merican warships weighs sixty and a half tons. It 
is forty feet long and the length of the rifling — that is, 
from the muzzle to the charge chamber — is 370.5 
inches. The powder charge of black powder is 550 
pounds; of smokeless, 280. The 1,100-pound steel 
projectile leaves the nuizzle with an initial velocity 
of 2.100 feet a second and would penetrate i^t,.^ inches 
of wrought iron at the time it leaves the gun. With 
the muzzle elevated at the proper ballistic curve, a little 
less than an angle of forty-five degrees, this projectile 



the: inglenook. 



"3 



would go twelve miles. It is not possible to get this 
elevation on a ship, however. 

The navy department realizes the importance of 
good shooting and takes care that Jack shall take more 
than an ordinary interest in his work at the gun. Be- 
sides the glorv and the extra money there are other 
emoluments coming to the record men in gunnery. 

Shore libert}', which is the sailorman's chief de- 
light, is served out liberally to the best marksmen, and 
often the officers of a ship chip in and give- extra 
prizes. There is aboard the Alabama a silver cup, 
purchased by the officers, on which the names of the 
best gun crews are engraved each year. 
^* ♦ ♦ 
THE MOUND BUILDERS. 



" So far as has yet been discovered, the mound 
builders could not build a stone wall that would stand 
up. In the absence of springs or streams the)' could 
procure water only by excavating a shallow pond ; they 
could not even wall up a spring when one was con- 
venient. They left not one stone used in building that 
shows any mark of a dressing tool. Their mounds and 
embankments were built by bringing loads of earth, 
never larger than one person could easily carry, in bas- 
kets or skins, as is proved by the hundreds of lens- 
shaped masses observable in the larger mounds. 
They had not the slightest knowledge of the economic 
use of metals, treating what little they had as a sort of 
malleable stone ; even galena, which it seems impos- 
sible they could have used without discovering its low 
melting point, is always worked, if worked at all, as 
a piece of slate or other ornamental stone would be. 
They left nothing to indicate that any system of writ- 
ten language existed among them, the few " hiero- 
glyphics ' on the ' inscribed tablets ' having no more 
significance than the modern carving by a boy on the 
smooth bark of the beech, or else being deliberate 
frauds — generally the latter in the case of the more 
elaborate specimens. The}- had not a single beast of 
burden, unless we accept the ' proof ' offered by a New 
York author that they harnessed up mastodons and 
worked them. Beyond peddling from tribe to tribe a 
few ornaments or other small articles that a man could 
easily carry or transport in a canoe, they had no trade 
or commerce. 

" Now, is there possible, under such circumstances, 
anything in the nature of what may be called ' civili- 
zation ' ? Can we conceive of a people as possessing 
even a slight degree of ' culture ' who are lacking in 
any of these particulars ? '' 

4* <► 4* 
VICTIMS OF WILD BEASTS. 



wild animals than in any year since 1875, except one, 
and reached a total of 3,651 while last year it was 
2,836, and the number of deaths from snake bite was 
23,166. 

Tigers killed 1,016 persons, of whom 544 perished in 
Bengal, sixty-five being in a single district. This was 
due to the depredations of a man eater, for the de- 
struction of which a special reward was olTered, with- 
out avail. In another district, says the London Times. 
were forty-three persons killed, most of them feU vic- 
tims also to one man eater. 

Wolves slew 377 persons last year. A campaign 
was undertaken against these animals in Rohilkhand 
and the Allahabad division and they have been almost 
exterminated in Cawnpore district, where they used to 
abound. 

Eleven thousand, one hundred and thirty deaths took 
place in Bengal alone from snakebite, 3,528 of these 



The Indian government reports chronicle the fact 
that during 1903 more human beings were killed by 




WOULDN T LIVE EAST, NOT IF THEY G.WE IT TO HIJI. ' 

being in the Patna division ; 80.796 cattle ( an increase 
over the previous year) were killed by wild animals 
last year, and 9,019 by snakes. Tigers killed 30,555 
of these; leopards, 38, 211,. and wolves and hyenas 
most of the remainder. 

On the other hand, rewards were paid last year for 
the destruction of 1,331 tigers, 4,413 leopards, 1.858 
bears, 2,373 wolves and 706 hyenas, while the num- 
ber of snakes killed for reward was 72,595. For the 
destruction of wild animals a sum of 96,952 rupees 
was paid, and 3,529 rupees for that of snakes. 

No account is taken of the number of predatory ani- 
mals killed by sportsmen and others who did not claim 
the legal rewards. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Let us onlv be patient, patient ; and let God our 
Father teach his own lesson his own way. Let us try 
to learn it well and learn it quickly ; but do not let us 
fancv that he will ring the school bell and send us to 



play before our lesson is learned.- 
♦ ♦ ♦ 



-Kincrslex. 



The stronger our faith, the greater will be our hap- 
piness and safety, so that we can cheerfully do and 
suffer what God imposes upon us, and this because 
we know that he is merciful and full of love toward 
us. — Selected. 



114 



THE INQLEINOOK. 



HUNTING WITH BLOWPIPES. 



The favorite weapon of the Indians of Guinea is 
known as the blowpipe, and in its use they are 
exceedingly expert. There are two kinds of this 
implement in use among them. The most common 
is called the poocoona. It is made of the oorah 
reed. This remarkable reed is only found in the 
Orinoco river and there only at certain spots. 
The oorah grows to the height of at least thirty 
feet and the basal joint, of which the blowpipe is 
made, is fourteen or fifteen feet long, straight as 
an arrow and without a knot. The inside of the 
reed is as smooth as glass, hence the facility with 
which the dart traverses it. \^ery little of the 
reed is cut away, so that the pipe is about twelve 
feet long and so strong that when held horizontally 
there is not the least bend in it. 

The reed having been carefully selected, cut and 
prepared, is inclosed in a small, thin palm trunk, 
which is split open for the purpose, scraped thin 
as a wafer and then rejoined with the reeds in 
the center. This palm for length, straightness and 
lightness is as remarkable as the reed. The whole 
pipe when finished never weighs more than a pound 
and a half or a pound and three-quarters. Both the 
mouth or muzzle and the breech are bell-mouthed, the 
bell pieces being fixed on. 

There are front and back sights, the latter formed 
of the cui-ved teeth of the Dasyprocta acouchi, a 
species of rodent somewhat larger in size than 
a wild rabbit. Two of the incisors of this ani- 
mal are fixed on the breech of the pipe by means 
of wax. The teeth being placed parallel to each 
other and very close together, the sight is taken 
between them. Sometimes the foresight is made 
in the same way, but it more often consists of 
the single sharp tooth of a fish. It is placed about 
a foot back from the muzzle, the back sight be- 
ing affixed four feet along the tube, so that it is 
a considerable distance from the eye when aim- 
ing. 

The missile used with this tube is misnamed 
an arrow. It is really a dart, scarcely bigger than 
a large darning needle and with a point quite as 
fine. The dart is made of the rib of a coocooreete 
palm leaf and is so heavy that it will sink in wa- 
ter. It is about seven inches in length, not thick- 
er than a large needle, and the usual number that 
an Indian carries with him when shooting is from 
three hundred and fifty to five hundred, ready poi- 
soned, but not prepared with the necessary cotton 
plugs. These darts are strung together something 
like the reeds on which soft cheeses are placed 
and then rolled on a stick and carried in a quiver, 
points upmost, it being requisite to protect them 
from every chance of of being broken or dulled. To 



protect the hand when handling them the top of 
the stick is furnished with a small, wheellike shield. 

The fine points are given to the darts by means 
of the teeth of the devil fish fSerrasalmns pirava) , 
and the cotton with which the)^ are plugged before 
use is found growing wild. It is bound to the 
base of the dart with thread made of silk grass, 
this thread, with wax obtained from several trees, 
being largely used also in making the blowpipe. 
The skill used in binding the plug of cotton to 
the dart must be great, or it will not fly true and 
far when shot. The Indian never carries more 
than five or six ready plugged and when these 
are lost he must draw others from the quiver and 
plug them. He always tries them repeatedly be- 
fore use and perhaps never succeeds in getting 
one to fly perfectly true. But if it is only a few 
inches out of flight, like a rifleman in aiming he 
makes allowance for this inaccuracy and it proves 
to be of little moment. 

The distance to and accuracy with which these 
darts are shot are simply wonderful, though the 
darts do not strike with any great force. The 
death of the game is occasioned not by the im- 
pact, but the poison with which the dart is tipped. 
The poison lodges in a tiny groove cut or rather 
scratched in the dart for the purpose of afford- 
ing it a lodgment and also in the notch cut near 
the tip. 

So finely pointed is the dart that it will pene- 
trate the flesh on a mere touch, and if any animal, 
such as a monkey, irritated by the prick, endeav- 
ors to draw it from the wound it breaks at the 
notch and leaves the fatal jag behind. 

There is a knack in blowing the darts from 
the pipe. One who knows says : '' I have suc- 
ceeded in propelling them about one hundred yards 
and I have never seen a European send them fur- 
ther, but the Indians puff them double that dis- 
tance and at one hundred to one hundred and 
fifty yards will hit a mark only a few inches square. 
I have seen native marksmen who could hit par- 
rots and toucans at the last distance once in two 
or three shots. 

" When a dart has been shot, if it misses its mark 
the Indian takes great pains to find it, on account 
of the danger it is to persons walking near the 
spot, for if trodden on it is likely to be as fatal 
as the bite of the most venomous snake. I have 
formed the opinion that the woorali poison used 
to tip the darts owes its great virulence to the 
venom of a snake which is mixed with it." 

-Mthough it is so light, the blowpipe is a clums> 
weapon to handle on account of its great length, 
and it is easily damaged. The slightest wrench 
or knock renders it useless and the Indian is 



THI 



INGLENOOK. 



"5 



most careful to avoid accidents of this kind. He 
carries the tube in a vertical position, never leans 
it aofainst a tree or places it on the ground with- 
out being sure that it will lie perfectly flat, and 
when it is not in use it is suspended in an up- 
right position to the bough of a tree or to a post 
erected near the. hut for the purpose. 

The darts must fit the tube closely enough to 
resist the passage of the tiniest stream of air, 
and yet so loosely as to traverse it easily^ and 
the attaching of the cotton plugs is a troublesome 
business, which often occupies the Indian for hours 
at a sitting. When the dart is placed in the tube 
it is pushed up with a small stick a distance of 
about fourteen inches from the mouthpiece. At 
this distance from the mouth the greatest force 
of the breath is obtained, but it is a matter of 
much practice to manage the breath properly. A 
steady, somewhat prolonged puff has more effect 
than a short, sharp one. 

4> <J* ^ 
FORECASTING THE WEATHER. 



The weather bureau is now a highly equipped or- 
ganization under Chief Willis L. Moore, the officer 
third in rank in the department. The country is cov- 
ered with its stations. Its reports, issued twice daily, 
have come to be looked for in every portion of the 
United States by all the people, whose daily life is to 
a certain extent influenced by them, and the value 
of its work in the saving of life and ship- 
ping on the coast by its prediction of storms and 
floods, as well as the saving to the crops through timely 
notice of sudden changes, such as frosts, etc., is in- 
calculable. 

The work which the people know best is the general 
forecasts of the weather, which are conducted on the 
best obtainable system ; forecasts which, though found- 
ed on an order of things as subject to law as the courses 
of the stars, are far from having yet reached the pre- 
cision as astronomical science, though the results ob- 
tained are unrivaled in their excellence by those of 
any other nation. 

The preparation of the weather map involves the 
daily sounding of the heights of the aerial ocean above, 
simultaneously by observers all over the country, and 
the joining of these sounding stations on the map by 
contour lines which indicate the direction of that great 
aerial ocean's flow. This direction cannot, of 
course, be determined with anything like the certainty 
attainable in the deduction of the path of a star, yet 
the result, though still a probability only, is a very 
.useful one, by which we all guide our daily lives. 
Will it be greatly better for us if it is ever- otherwise, 
and we come to the time when we know long in ad- 
vance what the weather will be, and this and many 



otlier like uncertainties are wiped out from the variety 
of our daily life ? 

These general maps are prepared in the office at 
Washington, from dispatches sent by local offices, and 
the bureau's use of the telegraph service costs $300,000 
per annum. It distributes in the shape of cards, maps, 
and publications nearly 55,000,000 pieces yearly, and in 
cases of special agricultural industries, particularly 
susceptible to destruction through changes in weather, 
special services have been established, notably for cot- 
ton, sugar, and rice, in the Southern States, and for 
fruit and wheat in California. — Scrihner's. 
<f ^ *> 
TEACHING POLL-PARROTS TO SPEAK. 



The strangest school in the world has been estab- 
lished in Philadelphia by a woman. It is a school 
where parrots are taught to speak by means of the 
phonograph, which is a new method only recently 
adopted by the founder of the school, Mrs. Jacob 
Hope. The old way of teaching parrots is tedious and 
unsatisfactory. The tutor, crouched in a corner out of 
sight of the bird, repeats to it, over and over thou- 
sands of times, the same word, the same phrase, till 
his back aches from his cramped and still position and 
till his voice cracks and gives out. The new way of 
teaching these birds to talk is pleasant and wonderful- 
ly successful. The tutor sets his phonograph going 
at the parrots's ear and then retires to read or to look 
after other business. His phonograph, while he rests, 
works for him. With a precision and a perseverance 
that he'could never equal, it drums into the brain of the 
bird the sentence that is to be learned. This sentence 
the parrot acquires much more quickly and much more 
thoroughly by the new way than b)' the old. 

The term at the Philadelphia phonograph school of 
languages for parrots lasts six months. The tuition 
fee is forty dollars a term, and the school has at pres- 
ent twenty pupils. — Leslie's Weekly. 

* *> ♦ 

More and more we are coming to feel that it is a 
disgrace for a healthy person to be doing nothing. 
Instead of boasting that they have an easy time, men 
are a little ashamed of confessing that their berth in 
life is an easy one. — Rev. Willard B. Thorp. 

♦ * * 

Grief for things past that cannot be remedied, and 
care for things to come that cannot be prevented, may 
easily hurt, but can never benefit me. I will there- 
fore commit myself to God in both and enjoy the pres- 
ent. — Joseph Hall. 

•J* •?• ♦ 

Have a heart that never hardens, a temper that nev- 
er tires and a touch that never hurts. — Charles Dick- 
ens. 



ii6 



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NAMING THE BABY. 



They talked of Medora. Aurora and Flora, 

Of Mabel, and Marcia, and Mildred, and May. 
Debated the question of Helen. Honora. 

Clarissa, Camilla, and Phyllis and Fay. 
They thought of Marcella, Estella. and Bella: 

Considered Cecilia, Jeannette and Elline, 
Alicia. Adela, Annette, Arabella. 

And Ethel and Eunice. Hortense and Irene. 
One liked Theodora, another Lenora; 

Some argued tor Edith and some for Elaine. 
For Madeline, Adeline, Lilly, and Lora; 

.\nd then, after all. they decided on Jane. 
* * ♦ 
ODDITIES IN PET NAMES. 



" Ik a man in this country calls his wife a cat, the 
foundation is laid for a divorce .suit." said the 
man who travels. " But a French woman takes 
the same word as a term of endearment. It is 
odd how the choicest phrases in the vocabulary of 
affection of one people are used for quite an op- 
posite purpose by another nation. One of the most 
familiar and most coveted phrases of endearment 
anions the French, for instance, is 'my little pig,' 
and ■ my little puppy dog ' is well liked. 

•• But' if the Frenchman were to call Mme. Nar- 
cisse • duck." as an American husband might lov- 
ingly call his better half, she would be very much 
offended. One of the oddest pet names that I ever 
heard of was that used by a famous German gen- 
eral, who always called his wife ' my little kernel 
of coffee." They were divorced at last, however, 
and a cynic said that the general"s pet name should 
have been 'my dear little stack of bayonets," for 
the lady was said to have had a very sharp tongue. 
1 know a devoted disciple of Walton, who, when 
writing to his wife while on a fishing expedition, 
calls her ' my dear little speckled trout." '" 
* * * 
SHIP PUSSIES. 



Ficw people are aware of the fact that cats form an 
important part of the crews of all ocean lines and that 
no steamer would dare to leave port for a trans-Atlan- 
tic voyage without a full complement of these use- 
ful animals. A comparatively small number of the 
passengers on one of these crafts ever see a cat at sea. 
Recently a cat that mysteriously found its way into the 
cabin saloon of the St. Paul while the usual concert 



for aged sailors was in progress, was hailed with as 
mtich astonishment as a messenger from Mars might 
have been. Some of the passengers seemed to think 
she had come from the sea, like a mermaid. A stew- 
ard seized pus.sy by the scruff of the neck and .she 
promptly disappeared. 

Every big liner carries from fifteen to twenty cats 
on a voyage. As a general thing they find plenty of 
occtipation scampering after the mice in the hold, but if 
any of them come lurking around the pantry they are 
bountifully fed. The only duty imposed on the stew- 
ards is to see that the cats do not get into the sleep- 
ing cabins or the saloon. 

♦ ♦ -S* 
QUITE DIFFERENT. 



" Did papa have any money when you married 
him ? " 

" No, dear." 

" How did you come to make such a sorry blun- 
der?" 

" You mustn"t call it a blunder, child. You know 
your father has plenty of money now. Besides, I 
would do the same thing again."' 

" Then why are you making such a fuss because I 
want to marry a poor young man ? " 

" Arabella, if yoti can't talk sense don't talk at all! " 
♦ * ♦ 

It is said that over thirty million artificial teeth are 
manufactured yearly in America, and a curious fact 
about them is that they have to be colored to meet the 
fashion prevailing in the various countries for which 
they are intended. England, nowadays, in common 
with most European countries, demands dull white 
teeth, but in Italy and Spain they are liked of a bril- 
liant china white. In South America there is a de- 
mand for yellow teeth, and in China, Japan and some 
parts of the Czar's domain the color varies from blue 
to black. 

<{• * 4- 

.An English duke of great wealth and large estates 
had occasion one day to dismiss one of his laborers. 
As the angry man was turning away he suddenly re- 
membered that the duke's '" lady " held a position at 
court with the queen. That was his chance and his 
cue, -SO he turned round on the duke, " Oh, yes, 
your grace," he said, " I'll go home. But though 
I'm a poor man, thank God I never had to send iny 
missus out to service as vou do vours," 



the: ingleinook. 



11/ 



WORTH REMEMBERING. 



MACARONI. 



Cake keeps best and cuts best on a flat tin slieet. 

Carefully wash all eggs, then use the shells for 
clearing coffee. 

A small quantity of jam or jelly will serve to flavor 
a pudding sauce. 

Dry cheese may be used in making a cheese omelet, a 
souffle, or cheese balls. 

.Small portions of vegetables add much to tlie sea- 
.soning of the stock. 

Utilize the tough stalks of celery as well as the roots 
in making a cream of celery soup. 

The oil from sardines may be substituted for but- 
ter in making fish cakes if the flavor is liked. 

Small scraps of meat may be converted into cro- 
quettes, cannelons and casseroles. 

Cold or mashed potaoes may be utilized by mixing 
with the meat for croquettes instead of bread crumbs. 

Gravies, sauces and soups, no matter how small the 
quantities, may be used in seasoning made-over dishes 
of fish or meat. 

Remove the cold fat from the water in which meats 
have been boiled, also save the dripping after roasting 
or frying meats. 

Pieces and crusts of bread may be made into pud- 
dings and griddlecakes or in the form of dry crumbs 
used for breading. 

Ma:ke a delicious pudding from the suet given when 
meat is purchased or melt down and add to the stock 
of fat kept for frying. 

Milk and custard puddmgs can be turned into a mix- 
ture for filling cheese cakes by the addition of eggs and 
a distinctive flavoring. 

Meat bones, scraps and tough pieces of meat, as 

well as carcasses of chicken and turkey, may be used 

in making soup stocks. 

♦ ♦ ♦:•• 

BRAIDS AND TWISTS. 



Roll bread dough into pencil shaped pieces about 
half an inch in diameter and five or six inches long. 
Brush these with melted butter. Press the ends of 
three pieces together and braid them, being careful to 
press the three finishing ends together. Let them rise 
to double their size and bake from fifteen to twenty 
minutes. Twists are made in same way, except that 
only two pieces of dough are twisted together. 

♦ <• ♦ 
REWARD OF MERIT. 



If you're good, my little children," 
Said the kind old jMother Rabbit, 
' You may some day be a sealskin 
Or a costly sable habit!" 



M.'\CARONi is served in many forms but is most pop- 
ular when baked with cheese. Break into inch lengths 
enough macaroni to half fill the baking dish to be used. 
Throw the macaroni into rapidly boiling salted water 
and cook, uncovered, until the macaroni is tender. Do 
not allow the water to slack boiling, for then the mac- 
aroni will stick. Drain in a colander and pour cold 
water over it so the different pieces will not stick to 
each other. Butter the baking dish and cover the bot- 
tom with macaroni, seasoning it with salt and pepper 
and sprinkling it with grated American cream cheese. 
On top of this place another layer of macaroni with its 
seasoning and grated cheese. Continue until all the 
macaroni is used, having the last layer of cheese. 
Cover with a thick layer of cracker crumbs. Fill the 
dish half full of milk and put tiny pieces of butter over 
the layer of crumbs. Place in the oven and bake 
until the milk is nearly all absorbed and the crumbs 
browned. Serve right in the dish. The cheese may 
be used generously or sparingly according to the in- 
dividtial taste. 

♦ * * 

BAKED APPLES. 



Take moderately sotir apples, and with a small 
sharp paring knife cut out the stems of the apples and 
dig down' far enough to remove the cores, but do not 
go clear through. Wash the apples well and place 
them in a baking pan. Fill the cavities with brown 
sugar and a sprinkle of cinnamon, placing a small 
piece of butter on top of each apple. Place the pan 
in the oven when the fire is first kindled and let them 
slowly heat and bake through. Take them up while 
hot by means of a spoon and dip over them any juice 
which may be left in the pan. Should any be left 
over set them aside until luncheon time, when they may 
be placed in the oven until hot and they will have the 
beauty of the first baking. 

* * * 
MAPLE TUTTI FRUTTI. 



Line a shallow, buttered pan to the depth of half 
an inch with finely cut or chopped mixed nuts, using 
pecans, Brazil nuts, walnuts, almonds, and fruits, 
dates, figs, raisins, candied orange peel, citron, lemon 
and grated cocoanut. Boil two pounds of grated 
maple sugar with one cupful of hot water until it will 
harden when a little is dropped in cold water. Do not 
stir it while boiling. Add a tablespoonful of vanilla 
and pour it over the nuts and fruits in the pan. When 
almost cold, mark off into squares with a buttered 
knife. Fewer fruits and nuts may be used and ii 
will be almost as delicious and less trouble to make. 



ii8 



THE INGLENOOK 




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THE "OUCHES.' 



The " Ouches " is the queerest crew 

On earth, or anywhere. 
They al'ays live inside o' you 

An' you don't know they're there. 
For jist as long as you are nice 

An' good as you kin be 
They'll stay as quiet an' still as mice. 

Fur they're asleep, ye see. 
But sometimes when you git a bump 

'At makes you kind o' mad, 
It wakes an Ouch! an' out he'll juntp, 

.\n' 'at's a sign you're bad. 

Most Ouches make your throat their home. 

Or, leastways, one appears 
Right there when mother starts to comb 

Your hair or wash your ears. 
-\n' funny thing about 'em, too. 

My mother tells about, 
An Ouch can do no harm in you 

If you don't let it out. 
So if you really truly care 

To be the boy you should, 
Jist shut your mouth an' keep it (here. 

An' at's a sign you're good. 

— Catholic Standard. 
* 4> * 

BEING TOO MANY PERSONS. 



" I MIGHT be one pretty good girl, perhaps, but as 
for being eight or ten of them I may just as well give 
up trying," said Mabel with a laugh, but with a little 
note of trouble in her voice. 

"Eight or ten girls?" questioned grandma, won- 
deringly. 

" Well, there's the neat one," explained Mabel. 
" I've heard her extolled until I resolved to keep my 
room and all my belongings in spotless order. It 
takes* nearly all the morning before school time to 
do it, and after I've succeeded for about a week, mam- 
ma gently remarks : ' I hope my girl isn't forgetting to 
be sisterly? I hear Rob mourning because Mabel 
never has time to help with his lessons any more.' 

" Then I'm full of remorse, and try to be the best 
sister possible — but my room sometimes suffers a lit- 
tle. That's only two of the girls. There's the brilli- 
ant student that I attempted when Uncle John told 
of her, and the missionary girl I wanted to be when 
I read that book last week. It's no use counting them. 
Every one crowds out the others, and I can't be all of 
them." 

" I should hope not ! " answered grandma. " Child, 



did you ever read what Paul said about ' diversity of 
gifts, but the same spirit ' ? Just be sure what spirit 
moves you, and then try only to be your best self, in 
your own place." 

* ♦ ♦ 

WHEN TO COMMENCE. 



" When I'm a big man," said Teddy Miller to his 
mother one Sunday afternoon when having their usu- 
al little talk, "I'm going to be rich and do ever so 
much good. I shall give most all my money to the 
poor folks to buy things to eat and wear. Don't you 
think that will be nice?" 

Mamma patted the curly head lovingly. " I hope," 
she said, " if God spares yotir life, ^hat you will do 
a great deal of good, but, my dear boy, you must be- 
gin now. Unless you are a generous, unselfish boy, 
you will not likely be a generotis, unselfish man. You 
will never do great things unless you learn to do little 
things first. Don't you know when you went to 
school you began with little words? You could not 
learn the big words at first. So, my son, you must 
ask God to help you to be unselfish now in every-day 
things, if you want to grow into a generous, helpful 
man." 

Teddy looked rather sober. To tell the truth, he 
was a little inclined to be selfish ; he did not always 
want to share his good things even with his sister 
Margie. He remembered, while mamma was talking, 
how he had gone to ride with Uncle Will yesterday, 
when it was really Margie's turn. 

He had pretended that he did not know where she 
was, but all the time he thought very likely that she 
was probably just across the street at May Dean's. 
The more Teddy thought, the more uncomfortable he 
grew. It was easier and pleasanter to think of do- 
ing hard things by and by than to do them now. 

'■ I've a verse for you, dear," said mamma. " ' He 
that is faithful in that which is least, is faithful also 
in much." I hope you will want more than anything 
else to be a good man, if you live to grow up. We 
are to think of Jesus, the perfect man, and to try to 
be like him. He is our pattern to go by. You know 
voti had a pattern to make your kite by the other day. 
You kept looking at it, and trying to have your kite 
just like the pattern, didn't you? .\nd just so you 
want to keep looking at Jesus and trying to be like 
him. But remember unless you are faithful in the 
little things, you will not be in the greater ones. 



"HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



119 



^^j Tfie Q* ^ (3i^ l^epartment* fW^ 



1 



-& 



What are the chances of a woman proofreader in the 
west? 

Just the same as a proofreader anywhere. It all de- 
pends on the woman and not on the locality. A 
really good proofreader is sure of work, and while 
there are proofreaders galore, of both sexes, the really 
good and perfectly reliable are not many. The place 
to learn proofreading is in a printing office. Once 
• you can read book proof and get it exacth' right you 
have a sure thing, anywhere, altogether independent 
of sex. 

What is the truth about radium turning negroes white? 

It is true, "in spots," so to speak; that is, the ap- 
plication or use of radium will bleach the skin of a 
negro, but it has never been applied all over one, and 
it is said that to do this would destroy the sight. It 
is not likely that it will ever be a thorough success. 
Occasionally a negro will turn white in patches, due to 
some obscure disease, but the white skin resembles 
the white of the belly of catfish, and is very disagree- 
able to see. 

What is the work of a topographical draftsman, what 
tools and what material does he use? 

The phrase topographical draftsman is an elastic 
one. In its simplest form he is the man who draws a 
map from data secured either by himself or others. 
He makes a picture in lines of the surface of things. 
The tools are few and simple. The main equipment is 
ability. It takes a long time learning to do it well, 
and one who knows commands good pay. 

* 

I am a colored girl, a reader of the Inglenook, antl find 
myself often unjustly treated by white people on account 
of my color. Is there any remedy? 

- Never give the matter of the white people a moment's 
thought, but devote your life to the elevation and bet- 
terment of your own race. This will be much better 
for all concerned than complaining about the treat- 
ment accorded by whites. White is as white does. 

+ 

Are there albinos among all animals? 

As far the Nook knows, yes. Albinism is more or 
less of a disease, and it is found in all animals, in- 
cluding man, though it may be rare in some species. 

♦ 

How can I find the value of rare coins? 

Get a catalogue put out by a reliable house buying 
and selling coins. 



How does the Publishing House pay for its mail? 

This puzzles a Nooker who desires information. 
The personal letters are paid by stamps affixed as any 
other letters. The papers are sacked, that is, put in 
mail sacks, properly routed, and a' representative of 
the post office comes over and weighs the whole lot. 
The publisher of a paper pays by the pound. Every 
effort is made to keep the classes of mail separate, as 
it would surely be detected, whether done with at- 
tempt to defraud or through carelessness. 

* 

Is there any good way to cure a child of sucking its 
thumb? 

Slight punishment may effect a cure, or a bitter 
solution of some kind may do it. The habit will like- 
ly be outgrown. Very few people escape some per- 
sonal habit, or oddity of handling themselves, that 
goes with them as long as they live. One of 
the worst is. nail-biting. 

* 

How is shot made? 

Melted lead is dropped from a high tower, passing 
through a pan with holes in the bottom. The larger or 
smaller holes make the various kinds of shot. Falling, 
the melted drops of metal assume a round shape and 
cool enough in the fall to retain this form when they 
reach the bottom. 

* 

What is the Parsifal, referred to so much in the papers? 

It is a musical drama by Wagner. It is pictorial and 
spectacular, teaching no definite lesson. It is rather a 
dazzling dramatization of a mediaeval legend of a re- 
ligious character. 

Do animals think? 

Undoubtedly some of them go through a certain men- 
tal process and arrive at results in a way that would 
be called thinking. But to sit down and " think it 
over," most likely not. Tlieir mental action is as oc- 
casion demands. 

* 

What, in brief, do Adventists believe? 

It is impossible to state a religious belief in a word 
or two, but the basic idea is in a second personal com- 
ing of Christ. There are also many other points of 
distinction between them and other sects. 

* 

How much of Chicago was burned in the great fire of 
1871? 

There were 17,450 buildings destroyed, covering an 
area of three and one-half square miles. 



I20 



THE INGLENOOK. 



WHAT'S THE USE ? 



A man approached a river bank, all on a -umnier day. 
Intent on crossing over in the most convenient way. 
He had a fox, a bag of corn, and eke a large, plump goose. 
And, coming to a small canoe, he quickly cut it loose. 
The room was scant — he saw he couldn't reach the other 

shore 
Unless he carried, one by one, his few possessions o'er. 

" Now, if I take the fox." said he, " the goose will eat the 

corn ; 
.^nd if I take the corn first, just as sure as I am born. 
The fox will eat the goose up. If the goose goes over 

first 
(Of all the jobs I ever struck this seems to be the worst), 
And I then take the fox or corn, why, neither dare I 

leave 
To keep the gooselet company: some plan I must con- 
ceive." 
Upon the bank he sat awhile, perhaps an hour or so, 
And finally he found a way. "Aha." said he, "I know!" 
The goose he ferried over, then returned and got the 

corn. 
Brought back the goose, next took the fox and left the 

goose forlorn; 
He put the fox beside the corn, for which it had no use, 
-And then, to close the incident, went back and got the 

goose. 

"Great head!" you say— well, yes, it was; but, moping on 

his way. 
This foxy gent exclaimed "Alas!" and likewise " Lacka- 

day! " 
He got across the river in the way that I have told, 
But scarcely had he done so when he met a footpad bold. 
Who swiped his corn, his precious fox and also his fat 

goose. 

The ni.pral of this lilting lay is simply "What's the use?" 

— Milwaukee Sentinel. 
•{• ♦ •> 

CAPITALS OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Of cour.se every schoolboy knows that Washington 
is the capital of the United States, but it is not risking 
much to say that few know there have been nine dif- 
ferent cities that have possessed that distinction since 
independence was declared. These cities are Washing- 
ton, Baltiinore and Annapolis in Maryland; Trenton 
and Princeton, in New Jersey; Philadelphia, Lancas- 
ter and York, in Pennsylvania, and New York city. 
The first session of the continental congress was held 
in Carpenter's hall, Philadelphia, Sept. 5, 1774. 
Thereafter the .\nierican congress was for a long time 
unsettled in its location, something like the Philippine 
congress while the latter was dodging .\inerican troops 
and for much the same reason. Fearing to remain 
in Philadelphia after the defeat on Long Island, it went 
to Baltimore, thence to Philadelphia again. Lancas- 
ter and York got their sessions after the defeat of 
IJrandywinc, congress again retreating. Nine months 
the lawmakers remained in York, Tlien six months in 
New York and another term in Philadelphia, Menaced 



bv unpaid troops, congress went over to New Jersey. 
Sessions were held in Priiiceton college library. An- 
napolis next, where General Washington resigned his 
commission. Trenton had a trial then, with Henrv 
Lee as President. Here Lafayette took leave of his 
.\m.erican allies. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
GATHERING CLOVES. 



Cloves are now ctiltivated in many of the tropical 
regions of the earth. A clove tree begins to bear at 
the age of ten years and continues until it reaches .the 
age of seventy-five years. There are two crops a year, 
one in June and one in December. 

The tree is an evergreen and grows from forty to 
fifty feet high, with large oblong leaves and crimson 
flowers at the end of small branches in clusters of from 
ten to twenty. The tree belongs to the same botanical 
order as the guava. The cloves, which are the unde- 
veloped buds, are at first white, then light green, and at 
the titne of gathering bright red. 

Pieces of white cloth are spread under trees at har- 
vesting time and the branches are beaten gently with 
bamboo sticks until the cloves drop. They are dried 
in the sun, being tossed about daily until they attain the 
rich dark color which proclaitns them ready for ship- 
ment. 

In this country and in England they are used almost 
wholly as a condiment, but in France they are used 
largely in the manufacture of certain liquors ; and to 
some degree they are employed in medicine for their 
tonic properties. 

4* 4* ^ 

There was a worthy Irish tneinber of parliament 
who was so generous that a request for financial as- 
sistance was never refused. But his checks had one 
little drawback, they were never honored. The short- 
coming naturally in time becatne known, but it did 
not affect his popularity. A visitor to the district, 
hearing of the member's peculiarity, asked a leading 
politician how it was that public faith in the member 
was not shaken. " Why, sure, it is because he shows 
his willingness to assist but for lack of funds," was 

the reply, 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

■■ The Inglenook is unique and good but it is too 
short." — Joseph Longanecker, Maryland. 



"Success to the Inglenook.' 
duina. 



Alice Wallick. 1,1- 



Want Advertisemenis. 



W.vNTEi). — .\ voting man, a brother, twenty years 
old, for seven years past on a farm woukl like employ- 
ment on a farm, Illinois or westward preferred. — 
Address the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



the: ingleinook. 



Eureka Indestructible Post 



Cheapas cedar. 
Made where 
used. No 
freight to pay. 
For terms, etc., 



Great inducements to agents. 

address with stamp. 

36t.^(; W. A. DICKEY. North Manchester. Ind 



SENT ON APPROVAL 
to Responsible People 

Laughlin 

Fountain Pea ■ 



Quaranteed Finest Qrade 
14k. Solid Gold Pen. 

To test the merits of the 
loglenook as an advertis- 
ing medium we offer your 
choice of 





These 
Two 
Popular 
Styles: 
For Only 



SjOO 



Postpaid 

to any 

Address. 




(By registered mail 8 cents 
extra.) 

Holder is made of finest 
quality hard rubber, in 
four simple parts, fitted 
with very highest grade, 
large size mk. gola pen, 
any flexibility desired — ink 
feeding device perfect. 

Either style — Richly 
Gold Mounted for pre- 
sentation purposes, $1.00 
extra. 

Grand Special Offer 

You may try the pen a 
week, if you do not find it 
as represented.- fully as 
fine a value as yon can se- 
cure for three times the 
price in any other makes, 
if not entirely satisfactory 
in every respect return it 
and we will send vou Si. to 
for it, the additional ten 
cents is for your trciuble in 
writing us and to show our 
confidence in the Laughlin 
pen. 

Illustration on left is full 
size of Ladies' style; on 
right, Gentlemen's style. 

Lay this Inglf-nook 
doTvn and Tvrite NOW 

Safety Pocket Pen Hold- 
er sent free of charge with 
each Pen. 

ADDRESS 

Laflghlio Mfg. Co. 

970 Oriswold St., 
OBTROIT, - MICH. 

Memion the INGLENOOK when wntinti 



FREE SAMPLE 

Sendletter or postal for aee SAMPLE 

HINDOO TOBACCO HABiT CURE 

We cure you of chewing and smoking 
for 60c., or money back. Guaranteed perfectly 
r ihannless. Address Uilford Dmg Ck)., Milford. 
Indiana. We answer all letters. 

; iltl.^ Wentinn the [NfiLENOOK when writing. 



In the IngUnook 

There is always room for wide- 
awake advertisers, who can appre- 
ciate the superior advantages of 
our journal. Write u.s. 



ARE YOU LOOKING 



FOR THE BEST SEWING 

M.AC HI NE ON EARTH? 



If so. look (or the 
highest Arm made, 
latest Bobbin Wind- 
er. Patent Tension 
Liberator, Positive 
Take-up. Thread di- 
rect from Spool to 
Needle, Double Lock 
Stitch, widest range 
of adjustment. Self- 
threading Shuttle, 
Self-setting Needle, 
Kall-beariiiK.wlth 
'i5 years' gunran- 
tee. Our " Equity" 
has all of these, and 
you may have ■ the 
privilege of ordering • 
it at our 



SPECIAT.rCASH PRICE 

which is lower thanldealers 
pay for them. 

S16.45 

For our High Arm, High 
Grade. Ba l-bearing, New 
Kquity Sewing Machine, 
complete in this style cabinet 



SEND FOR CATALOG. 




I' THE EQUITY MFG. & SUPPLY CO. 
Chicago, 111. 



INDIA==A PROBLEM 



By W. B. STOVER 



Is one of the best selling books ever put out by the House. It 
contains a large number of illustrations, and describes the work that 
our Missionaries are doing, and the difficulties they have to contend 
with. 

Any one, after reading this book, will have a splendid idea of 

India and Her Customs. 

Also will want to do more to lift her people out of sin and degra- 
dation. 

Agents are reporting large sales of books, and if you want to 
make some money quick 

Write Us for Terms to Agents, 

Giving name of township and county wanted. Fiease note that we 
do not reserve territory in any other way. 

The book, in cloth binding, sells for Si. 25; morocco, S2.00. 



Brethren Publishing: House, 



Elgin, Illinois. 



.»4>»H- » ■!■ ■;■ ■!■ - i - - t - » •! ■ ■ ! ■ » • ! ■ » • ^ ♦ ^ - ■ ! ■ a - • ; • a - ■ ! • a - •:■ < ■ ■!■ » » ■ 






I 



THE TRUTH OF THE MATTER 



If a farmer were to proclaim that he could sow 
seed on a cement sidewalk, and, without moisture, 
raise a crop of wheat, he would be regarded as be- 
ing foolish or talking for notoriety — no one would take 
him seriously. 

It is largely so with medicine and the cure of dis- 
ease. No honorable, intelligent physician will ever 
claim that he can cure this, that or any other so- 
termed incurable disease where the organs of the body 
are already destroyed by the ever-present bacilli. No, 
an honorable doctor will frankly admit that all he can 
do is to assist nature in the cure of the disease. For 
instance, your boy breaks his thigh-bone ; you will 
at once send for a surgeon, who does not come with a 
chisel and saw to repair the break, but who sets to 
work to help nature and tells you that nature must 
perform the cure. 

He orders the patient tfe be placed in a horizontal 
position, surrounds the leg with splints and a pla's- 
ter cast, and comes every few days to see that the 
limb has been kept accurately in place, so that the 
bone may properly knit, thus preventing the boy from 
becoming a cripple for life. 

The faithful and careful doctor will eventually have 
the satisfaction of seeing his patient walk perfectly 
straight and will not make any other claim but that 
he rendered nature valuable and necessary assistance. 

The proprietor of DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITAL- 
IZER has, since the beginning of his practice, over 
forty-four years ago, made no other claims for his 
remedies than that they assist nature, and the grati- 
fying results reported from thousands of happy homes 
throughout the land bear witness of their helpful- 
ness. 

A MINISTER WRITES. 

Muscatine. Iowa, July ii, 1901. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — It is not my habit to brag, but when I am 
convinced by facts that a thing is good I consider it my 
duty to acknowledge it publicly. As you will know, I 
have been agent for your medicines for over fifteen years 
and have sold a great deal of same, .\lthough I frequent- 
ly heard the people praising your preparation, I kept in 
the background and said nothing, inasmuch as I thought 
that they might consider me prejudiced, as I was selling 
your preparations. I consider it my duty, however, to 
report on two cases, in particular, which have come under 
my notice, and where your medicine has almost worked 
miracles. 

Mr. Henry Faks, of Pond street, had a son about four- 
teen years of age, whose leg was in such a condition that 
the doctors had to cut it open and scrape the bone, but 
notwithstanding all their efforts they were unable to get 



V •♦• *i 
»^i ij« »ji *j« »j, »j« >ji ij, ,j, »ji ,j« »j,^ 



the leg to heal. Finally some one recommended the 
Blood Vitalizer to them. They commenced to use it, and 
after having taken ten bottles of the remedy the boy 
walks about the streets again and plays as other boys do. 
The doctor's bill was $430. The Blood Vitalizer cost 
them $12.50. • ; 

Mr. Ohlf. a neighbor of Mr. Faks, suffered from sciatic 
rheumatism, so that he was unable to walk. He was tak- 
en to a doctor who promised to cure him:. He treated 
him for two weeks, but he grew steadily worse, and his 
stomach got out of order as a result of the medicines 
which he had to take. Finally he. too. commenced to 
use the Blood Vitalizer, and now. after having used five 
bottles, he called on me personally and remarked how 
well he felt. He is now able to work all day, and walks 
without the aid of a cane. I could tell you of many sim- 
ilar cases, but as I am not a friend of many words I will 
close. Your Blood Vitalizer is recommended to others 
by those who use it, consequently it is unnecessary for 
me to say a word. ^ Yours very truly, 

1000 Iowa Ave. Rev. H. Stellrecht. 

DID NOT THINK HE WOULD LIVE. 

Marengo, Iowa. Dec. 5. 1900. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir:^A'fter a long time I thought I would let you 
know that I am still among the living. About fifteen 
years ago I was in a bad fix. I had rheumatism in my 
ankles, hips and shoulders; my stomach was swollen like 
a drum. I was so stiff that I was unable to dress my- 
self without help, and so nervous I could not write my 
name. All my friends who saw me said, " Good-bye, 
Mack," as they thought I could not possibly live. I 
heard about your Blood Vitalizer over in Greene town- 
ship. I sent over there and got two bottles. I took 
about a bottle and a half and I found out I was a differ- 
ent man, although seventy-nine years old. When my 
neighbors saw what it had done for me they said. '" Send 
and get some more." That is the way I came to take the 
agency. Everybody says it is the best medicine in the 
world. Things are quite different with me now to what 
they were fifteen years ago. Yours truly, 

James McCombs. 



SPENT A SMALL FORTUNE. 



01. 



Los Angeles, Cal, June 7 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago. 111. 

Dear Sir: — I have used two bottles of your Blood Vi- 
talizer for a stubborn case of indigestion and stomach 
trouble. The effect is better than I had even hoped for. 
One tablespoonful an hour before breakfast has proven 
a success, where $3,000 spent on doctors and various med- 
icines have utterly failed. If you have no agency in this 
city, please let me hear from you at once with terms, etc. , 

Gratefully yours, 
C. I. Parker, Deputy Ta.x Collector. 

Unlike other ready-prepared medicines DR. PE- 
TER'S BLOOD VIT.'\LIZER is not to be had in 
drugstores. It occupies a place in the field of medi- 
cine all by itself and is not brought in competition with 
the ordinary " traffic goods " which fill the shelves of 
the drugstore. It is sold to the people direct, through 
the medium of special agents appointed by the pro- 
prietor, 



Jol 



DR. PETER FAHRNEY, ,^ 

112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, III. 



HI 



ingi_e:nook. 



I 



t 



FOR RENT 



I 

I 

t 



Three choice grain and stock 
farms, near Woodstock, Mc- 
Henry County, Illinois; i6o 
acres at $3.25 per acre, 400 acres 
at $2.25 per acre, and 440 acres 
at $2 per acre. Special terras to 
reliable tenant. Will divide the 
land to suit. Agent, 

R. A. CANTERBURY, t 

15s La Salle St. Chicago. X 

2t, MpnlKin th<> TM.U.KNOOK when wntink 

Howell County, So. Missouri 

la the country of to-day for the homeseeker. The 
best plaee in the U. S. for a poor man or a man 
of moderate means to get a start in life. It is a 
rolling, timbered country and no prairie. There 
are few spots in the U. S. that have better cli- 
mate—short winters, and summers not so hot as 
in the Northern States. The products are corn, 
wheat, oats. rye. timothy, clover and every- 
thing that can be raised in this latitude. It is 
also one of the coming fruit countries of the 
U. S. West Plains, the county seat, is a good, 
live town of "^,500 people, located on the main 
line of the Frisco R. R. We have lands for sale 
ranging in price to suit everyone. Would you. 
kind reader, like to have a home in this favored 
country? i^o malaria, etc. No colored people. 
We have just located a few Brethren people 
here and want more We want every reader of 
this paper to write us for our pamphlet, T/ie 
Homeseekers'' J?eview, land list and map of the 
country. Bank and other references furnished. 
Address at once: 

SIMMONS & EPPS, 

West Plains, Mo. 



52-n 



Mention the INGLEWOOK when writing. 



SKAEE yOTJB XDIiE MOITE'S' HABIT 
10 to 20 per cent per auinun 

by investing now in a g-ood, lionest, 
highly successful commercial enter- 
prise, well established, earning- large 
profits and paying dividends of 10 to 
20 per cent per annum. regTilarly and 
safely. We believe no other invest- 
ment obtainable to-day equals this 
one for large and steadily increasing 
profits, economical management and 
absolute safety. Pull particulars 
free upon application. Address: 
Newcomer & Price, Mt. Morris, HL 



SO EASY TO FORGET. 



4t4 



MeniioD the INGL 'JiOOK when wntina 



Job Printing 



» . { . » i , . : ■ » : ■ . t . . :■ ■ } ■ . t •:< 't < • > » t ' • :■ - i >m ->^>4'» 

The Kind that Brings Re- 
sults, the Kind you needn't 
be ashamed of, the Kind 
that is Cheapest in the End 
because Just as You Want 
it, — Furnished by 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



In 999 cases out of every thou- 
sand, the directions which accom- 
pany a physician's prescription or 
proprietory medicine, tell you to 
take a dose three or four times a 
day, either before or after meals, 
and on going to bed. In 999 cases 
out of a thousand, this rule is never 
strictly followed. You start in to 
observe it religiously, and succeed 
pretty well at first, but soon you'll 
begin to skip doses, then the medi- 
cine fails in its intended effect. It's 
so easy to forget. 

If the remedy is in liquid form, 
the business man loses a dose in the 
middle of the day unless some 
thoughtful wife, mother or sister 
gives him a spoon and makes him 
take an extra bottle to the office. 
Alost men hate to do this. If the 
medicine is in tablet form, the 
chances are he will never think of 
it until he reaches for car fare on 
his way home. It's so easy to for- 
get This applies to men arid wom- 
en alike. 

The proprietors of Vernal Pal- 
mettona (formerly known as Vernal 
Saw Palmetto Berry Wine) had 
sense and foresight enough to make 
their remedy so that only one dose 
a day is necessary. It is easy to re- 
member to take it after the last 
meal or on going to bed. It stands 
in a class by itself. If you are pes- 
tered with indigestion, constipation, 
liver trouble, bowel trouble or any 
skin aiHiction resulting from bad 
blood, Vernal Palmettona is what 
you need. Try it at our expense. 
Write for a free sample bottle. It 
will do 3'ou good. Address, Ver- 
nal Remedy Co., 419 Seneca Build- 
ing, Bufifaio, N. Y. Sold at all 
druggists. " 



To Advertise. 



Judiciously is an art, and many make 
a failure because they lack knowl- 
edge. Advertisers will be helped by 
our advertising experts, in securing 
the best possible results. 
Brethren Publishing House, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



. VV \66TTMC DCSTi, /y 
riC/'K "■■ . IINMflLER MADE .'// •_ ■^,ii%,t 




• ' W1LWCURC TMC 

'MFOOM W,£TaFw£mmjT£j ,^ 









A'$1.00 Pocket Inhaler for 
Only 25 Cents. 

Consists of medicated air treatment, 
curing Headache. Catarrh. Cold in the 
Head. Sore Throat and Toothache. Very 
convenient to use and good for three years' 
service. Price, 25 cents each or 5 for Si.oo, 
postpaid. 

The 




Little Gem 

Lung Tester and 
Developer is 

soniethingL: every- 
body should use 
freely. Strengthens 
and develops the 
Jungs as no medi- 
cine can possibly 
do. Children find 
great delight in 
using this novelty, 
and the more they 
use it, the stronger 
'^^^^"'^^■^^^^ and healthier they 
will be. Its continued use prevents sickness 
colds, weak lungs and consumption. Regis- 
ters accurately the exact lung capacity of 
each individual, and with proper care will 
last several years. Each instrument well 
made, neat and attractive. About 5 inches 
long. Price, 25 cents each or 5 foi Si.oo, 
postpaid. Address all orders to 



H. E. 



NEWCOMER, 

Mt. Morris, 111. 



52,2,5,8,11 Menlion the INGLENOOK when writing. 



EUREKA GOODS! 

Are Alisolutely Pure and Fresh. Sold 
upon Merit and G-naiantee. 

A FEW IiEABEBS. 

Our Father's Hog' Cholera Core. . . Pound 
can, 50 cents. 

Our Mother's Poultry Powder and Chol- 
era Cure. Pound can, 50 cents. 

Our IVIother's Healing Ointment. 25 
cents per jar. 

Our Mother's Tooth Powder. 25 cents 
per box. 

Our Mother's Electric Silverware Polish. 
25 cents per box. 
Any or all sent postpaid. Satisfac- 
tion guaranteed or money refunded 

without a single question. 

Special terms to local and canvassing 

agents. Write to-day. 

EUBEEA SPECIALTY CO., 
Box 438 Decatur, HI. 

4tl3 



Mention the INGLF.NOOK when writinfi 




WHY SO SURE? 

It's made on the right plan, 
it works rieht. It brings best 
results to tiie beginner as well 
as the experienced poultry 
raiser. THE 

Successful 

is the nearest of all the out and out automatic 
m-chines. both Incubator 
and Brooder. They can be 
depended upon xmder all 
conditicis to batch the most 
and brood them the best. All 
J 1 eastern orders have prompt 
^ shipment from Buffalo. 100 
_ - — _•..- pens of standard fowls, in- 
cubator Catalog freei withPoultry Catalog 10c. 
OesMolnosDncufaatorCo. Dep 441 , Des Molnos, la. 




the: ingleinook. 



♦ <■■ ! ■ ■!■ » ■ ! ■ » ■ ! ■ <■ < ■ ' f * * ■!■ * * •!■ ■!■ » < ■ » <■ ■ » ■ » * » » * <• » * * * * » » »♦♦ » » > t - » • ! ■ ■!■ >t' * >t- •!■ <■ ■!■ •!■ ■ » ■ ' 

4* 



i • 



• • 



The Qospel Messenger 



lA i6-Page Weekly- 



Devoted entirely to the interests of the Brethren church 
and the cause of Christ. It contains spicy articles on 
live topics written by the ablest thinkers and writers in 
the church. If you are not familiar with it, drop us a 
card and we will take pleasure in mailing you a sample 
copy. 

Special Combination Offer. 

Qospel Messenger, one year, .... $1.50 
The Book " Eternal Verities," by D. L. Miller, ^tuJ" '-25 



BOTH rOGETHER, EITHER OLD 
OR NEW SUBSCRIBERS, . . . 



$1.75 



BRETHREN UBLISHINQ HOUSE, 

ELQIN, ILLINOIS. 



» ■!■ it if . t . ■!■ - t - t ' t - • ! ' • : • » - t - » * < • • : • ' t - ' t ' ' t ' 't' ' t >V ' V ■ ! ■ ■{■ <■ • ! • • ! • ■!■ ■ ! ■ ■ > ■ 1 ' • ! • ' ! ■ ■ ! ■ * • ! ■ * * * • ! > > t > ■ ! ■ • ! ' ■ ! • ■ ! ■ • ! ■ ■ ! < » * • ! • • ! ■ • ! ■ 



The Busy Man's Friend... 




Here is a book for you. The Busy 
Man's Friend is a book that we give away. 
It is not very large. You can carry it in 
your coat pocket, but it is full, from cover 
to cover, of things that every man ought to 
know. It is made up of the odds and ends 
cf information in regard to everyday knowl- 
edge, such as matters of legal interest, 
measurement of buildings, and rules of ac- 
tion generally Just what you want to 
know and don't know where to find it 
It is all in the Busy Man's Friend, the 
book tliat we give away. Thousands and 
thousands of them have been put out to 
the entire satisfaction of those who got 
them. Have you had yours yet? H not 
here is the way you can get it: Send us the 
name of one new subscriber to the Ingle- 
nook Magazine, remitting $1.00 with your 
order, and we will send you the book free 
of charge for your trouble and also place 
the new name on the mailing list from now 
on until the end of the year 1904. 

You may be a busy man yourself. If so, 
you want a friend of like tastes. That is 
the book, for The Busy Man's Friend con- 
tains just what you want to know without 
wasting your time looking it up in other 
places. See that you get that book aa soon 
as the mails cin bring it to you. 



Brethren Publishing House, 

Elgin, Illinois. 



Free! Freel! 

Our 1903-04 6 4 -page 

Book and Bible... 

Catalogue 

* * * 

It contains many handsome cuts oi 
books and Bibles and gives full descrip- 
tion and price of same. In fact it is the 
largest and most complete catalogue 
ever put out by the House. Order it 
now. A postal card will bring it to you. 

Address 

Brethren Publishing House 

Elsfin, Illinois. 







Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anvone flenrllng a pitetoh and description may 
quiclcly u.3ceriiiiii our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Coniniunica- 
tionsstrictlyconfldentiat. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. OMeat apency for securing patents. 

Patents taken tbroueh Munn & Co. receive 
special notice^ without c harg e, in the 

Scientific Jliiierican. 

A handsomely illustrated weekly. I.nreeat cir- 
culation of anv scientific journal. Terms. $3 a 
year ; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN &Co.3«'««'^''"''v- New York 

Branch Office. 625 F St.. Washinelon. D. C. 




*to 



Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

t A. H. HANSON. C. P. A.. CHICAGO. 






B] 



Several Handsome Premiums 



One of the things that nearly everybody wants, and certainly everybody finds occasion to use from 
jme to time, is a fountain pen. Now the Inglenook has a number of Laughlin Fountain Pens, in both 
adies' and gentlemen's style. These pens are advertised and sold by the thousands, and readers of high- 
j)riced magazines haVe often seen them advertised. They come in boxes, accompanied by an arrange- 
nent to fill them with ink; have a gold pen, and they are as fine a Fountain Pen as you will likely find 
jinywhere for the money. These pens sell for one dollar, and we will make you a present of one if you get 
Iwo new subscribers for the Inglenook. 




', Almost any Nooker can get two of his neighbors to take the Inglenook for a year and get, for his 

rouble, one of these beautiful and effective Fountain Pens. Remember, that for two new subscribers you 
yill get the pen. 

' Where is the boy, or man or woman for that matter, who does not need a knife? Now, it so hap- 

lens, that we have in our possession a number of well-made pocket knives which we intend to give away 
our friends. Anybody who sends in one new subscriber will receive by return mail, for his trouble, this 
Substantial pocket-knife. The Inglenook editor has carried one of these around with him all over the 
IJnited States, or that part of it which he has visited in the interest of the Nook family. It is a strong 





Inife and one that will last for many a year. It is made by the Lawton Company, of Chicago, and on re- 
eipt of one new subscriber, which any present Nooker will get, we will remember him with a pocket- 
nife that will last him a good part of a lifetime, if he does not lose it. We do not guarantee against loss 
ut we will guarantee this knife to be a good one. This knife would sell for 50 cents in a regular store. 

Now every woman likes to have a knife just 
as well as a boy or man and she can put it 
to more usage than any man or boy would 
.•er think of doing. To provide for her we have a beautiful little pearl-handled knife with two blades, 
jtst such a knife as a lady would like to have and will cost at least 75 cents if bought at a hardware store. 

Now whoever sends in two new subscribers for the Inglenook is going to get'one of these knives. 
is a stout, well-built knife, big enough for any purpose for which a penknife maybe used, and our guar- 
litee with this is, that after you get it if you lose it you will be sorry. 

Now, furthermore, suppose you start out to get new subscribers for the Inglenook, and nobody 
news how to talk it up better than those who have read it, and you are one of them. Suppose you get 
ae new subscriber, that means a knife for yourself if you happen to be of a masculine persuasion. 

Supposing that you find it easy to get another subscriber, you have a chance to get the Fountain 

n; and if you get two more, making four in all, you can have the Ladies' Knife and the Fountain Pen, 

)th of them handy things to have about. Do the best 3'ou can, and that is the best done by beginning 

jht away. The knives and pens are ready for you and will be sent from this office on receipt of the. 

bscriptions. 



,- 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 

■Fixe 3S^a.il Oirc^eir ^Zoiiae. 
333-335 Dearborn St., "That's the Place." CHICAGO, ILI 



^^ ^^ _^ • < xheonstant increase in the volume of orders that we are receiving daily from the readers of the Inglen-i 

^O Odt^ P^f ICttClS proves to us that we have made a friend o( everyone that has patronized us during the past year. 

appreciate this confidence in us very much and sliall always endeavor to handle our business in a manr 

that will prove us worthy of the same. We guarantee every article to be exactly as represented and will replace any that are not satisfactory, or will refu 
the money sent us, together vrith transportation charges. Your orders will be given very careful attention and will be filled promptly. 



Alarm Clock that Does ilarml 

The accompanying cut 
is a small illustration 
of our Parlor Alarm 
Clock. This beauti- 
ful clock is made 
vrith a cast iron case, 
gun metal fintgh.and 
has scroll ornamen- 
tation, as shown in the 
illustration. The 
alarm bell is skillfully 
concealed in the base 
of the clock and has an 
extremely long and 
' lond ring, making it a 
sure awakener. 
The movement is the very best and is guaran- 
teed for two years. Will run thirty hours 
without winding. If you forget to wind it at 
night it will be running the next morning. It is 
dust proof and practically indestructible. 
It is fully worth five ordinary alarms, being the 
most durable and substantial ever offered. 
SH inches high, weighs yA pounds, and tfl AA 
mil be shipped by express upon receipt of «|>I.VW 





27 PIECES-e knives, 6 forks, 6 
tablespoons, 6 teaspoons, 1 butter knife, 1 
sugar shell, 1 picklefork, of the ROGERS' 
STERLING BRAND, finest coin silver 
plate, in a fine, satin-lined, brocaded 
velvet case, exactly as shown in the small 
Illustration. This offer is genuine, and we 
guarantee satisfaction absolutely, and will re- 
turn your money if you do not find the goods 
exactly as represented. Over 200 of these 
sets now in use in 'Nookers' homes, and all 
giving satisfaction. The set weighs about 7 
pounds and will be shipped by express on re- 
ceipt of S2.S5 from readers of the Inglenook. 

Alaminnm Salt & Pepper Shaker. 

Two pieces, each 2j4 inches 
high, ili inches in diameter, ex- 
actly as shown in the illustration, 
made of solid aluminum, 
satin finish and polished, sim- 
ilar in appearance to sterling sil- 
ver. Fitted with bevel tops, 
which are always secure, yet 
easily removed for filling. Use- 
ful and ornamental. Our spe- 
cial offer to Nook readers. One 
set sent postpaid with our "tAr 



catalogue for. 



Table Cutlery 

In order to meet the many inquiries we have 
received from the readers of the Inglenook 
we submit the following offers of Table Cut- 
lery. This cutlery is the very best to be had 
and cannot be duplicated for the same money 
elsewhere. The forks and blades are of the 
best steel, finished in the best of workmanship, 
and are not case hardened iron as is usually 
offered. If ordered by mail send 35 cents ex- 
tra per set. 



A-38. — Single bolster, straight steel 
blade, cocobolo handle, set of 6 Knives 
and 6 Forks, for 83 cents 

A-39. — Same as above, with black 
ebony handles, 99 cents 

A-40. — Single bolster, scimeter steel 
blade, just as illustrated, cocobolo han- 
dle, set of 6 Knives and 6 Forks, for 

96 cents 

A-41. — Same as A-40 but black ebony 
handle 91.iO 



imi^iP 



straight steel 

Set 6 Knives 

98 cents 



A-42. — Double bolster, 
blade, cocobolo handle, 
and 6 Forks, for 

A-43. — Double bolster, Scimeter steel 
blade, cocobolo handle — just as Illus- 
trated. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks, for 
91.00 



A-44. — Single bolster, straight steel 
blade, oval swell cocobolo handle. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks, for 51-00 

A-45. — Same as above, but Scimeter 
blade '!•" 




m-=^^ 



i.i miiiiiliiiiiiliiilNii 

A-46. — Double lap bolster, Scimeter 
blade, polished oval swell cocobolo han- 
dle. The very best to be had. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks, for $1-57 

Kitchen Knife Set 



ATVason Jaols.s ^^^^^^^^^^ 



This Wagon Jack is made 
entirely of Iron, is easy to 
operate and is self-locking 
and self-adjusting. The 
hundreds of satisfied cus- 
tomers that are now using it 
proves it to be the most per- 
fect Wagon Jack made. It 
1 weighs 8 pounds and will lift 
18,000 pounds. ... 65 cents 





Special handkerchief Sal 

A-48. — GenuU 
linen 12 x 12-iri 
ladies' handkfl 
chief with 1 Ini 
fancy draw 
stitched bord 
t ri m m e d 
around with on 
half - inch Fren^ 
Valenciennes ed 
Ing. A very dainty article, as illu 

trated. Each, postpaid 10 cen 

A-49. — Ladies scalloped edge silk ei 
broidered handkerchief. One corn 
with a handsome floral design embrol 
ered in silk in assorted colors. Per dc 
en, postpaid 60 oeu 



A-47. — Bread Knife 1 Cake Knife and 
1 Paring Knife, made of the best cold 
rolled nickeled steel and will give satis- 
faction. The handles are firmly swaged 
to the blades and will not come loose. 
Per set of three Knives 16 cents 





Comfortable Rockei 



/ 



fl! 




Large and roomy; made of good st( 
highly polished: made in oak or 
guaranteed the lowest priced com^ 
chair sold. Has high back and bt 
top slat; a bargain. 

A-50. — In oak 

A-61. — In elm 



I'ta 



Send all Orders to 



Albangh, Bros., Dover & Co., 323=325 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



■m :l 



*'1 
a, 

or 1 
IB i 




iNSbEKOOK, 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




A Shady Nook Near Oklahoma City. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



February 9, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 6, Volume VI 



HI 



INQL-ENOOK. 



BIG VALUES IN 
TEAM HAKNESS. 



OUR CO-OPERATIVE 
PRICES 



Make Every "Equity" Harness a Bargain. 

Single, double, driving, team, farm — in fact, we will furnish you any kind you want at a lower price than 
any other factory will name. Our co-operative plan of making harness saves considerable in 
the cost of production and selling expenses. Conse- 
quently, we can furnish you a better harness at a lower 
price. 



This 
high grade __ 

onir" $21.50 

Bridles, 

%-in. flat 
reins. check 
frora 
hames, 
round 
winke*" 

stays, sensible blinds. XC 
bits. Hames, high top, wood, 
clip and staple, steel bound. 
HHiue tugs, attached to 
hames. Traces, i i4-in. x 6 ft.. 
doubled and stitched, cock- 
eyes sewed in, to buckle in 
hame tugs. Pads, hook and 
terret, heavy wide fold, with 
i!4-in. billets to fasten into 
traces, buckled liaek »»traps, 
i!4^-in. wide, running through 
to hames. Hip straps, i-in. 
wide, wiih trace carriers. 
Lines, ^g-inxiSft. with snaps. 
Breast straps, i'4-in.. with 
slides and snaps. Pole 
straps, \li-in. Two hitch 
reins, XC trimmed. 

No. H-468, with collars, $24.50 
Less collars 21.50 

Breeching:, suitable for this harness. 

extra $3.00 




4^\l/U/Vi>\l>\lAi/\tiVlAl/(l/UAlAl>il>\l/U/ 



Falls City, Nebr. ' 

S. B. Fahnestock, Sec, McPherson, Kansas. j 

Dear Bro : — After greetings to you, ... I am very glad to hear of the large ' 

enrollment at the college this year. I hope and pray that you will have a glorious and j 

prosperous year. " 

My eight children have all been at McPherson College, and are now all in the j 

church. May the good Lord help us to hold out faithful to the end. " 

I do not say it to flatter you, but say it because it is true, that the McPherson j 

College is sending out a great influence for good in the western country, and by coming ' 

in contact with those of other schools I am convinced that McPherson College excels. J 

So I bid you Godspeed. Go on in the good work. You are sowing good seed. ' 

Though clouds may rise and sometimes the future may look dark, yet press onward and { 
upward, your work is telling. 

Yours fraternally, ! 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ George Peck. 

McPherson College, Kansas, emphatically the people's college. Everybody is ad- , 

mitted on the basis of character, without examination. ; 

The school stands for the brotherhood of man. The doors stand wide open for the \ 
American youth who are destined to direct the affairs of the church and country. We 

educate the head, the heart and the hand. Do not attend a college for the purpose of ; 
learning how to get money without earning it. Attend for the purpose of becoming 
stronger and nobler; to become more efficient in preaching and practicing the gospel of 
service. 

Enrollment over 330 and still they come. Wake up. Here is a chance. If you 
don't want us to knock at your door with a battering ram, write us at once. 
' We still want some students to do work for part expenses. McPherson College is 

doing well in numbers, in Christian education and in character building. ^ 

Mcpherson COLLEQE, McPherson, Kansas. ^ 



To Advertise... 



Judiciously is an art, and many make a failure 
because they lack knowledge. Advertisers will 
be helped by our advertising experts, in secur- 
ing the best possible results. 



FRUIT TREES! 

Complete Assortment Small Fruits, Roses 
Shrubbery, Evergreens, etc. Clean, strong, 
healthy stock, well rooted. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction. Club raisers wanted in every neigh- 
borhood. Special inducements now. Write for 
terms and prices. 48113 

E. MOHLER, Plattsburg, Mo. 



HOMESEEKERS' EXCURSIONS TO 
THE NORTHWEST, WEST AND 
SOUTHWEST, AND COLONIST 
LOW RATES WEST. 

Via the North Western Line. Excur- 
sion tickets at greatly reduced rates are 
on sale to the territory indicated above. 
Standard and tourist sleeping cars, free 
reclining chair cars and "the best of 
everything." For dates of sale and full 
particulars apply to agents Chicago and 
North-Western Railway. 

TO CALIFORNIA, 

\'ia the Chicago. Union Pacific & 
North-Western Line. Two .solid fast 
trains through to California daily. 
The Overland Limited (electric light- 
ed throughout) less than three days 
en route, leaves Chicago 8 P. M. .'Vn- 
iither fast train leaves Chicago. 11;. 35 
P. M. .^pply to .Agents Chicago & 
Xonh-VVestern R'y. 



t 



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't •>^'M^»:-M>>*j^^^^**fr4^M^*^»^*>^*^»^«^»^>^^^ 






the: ingleinook. 



STERLING, 
COLORADO 



Just the place you are 
looking for. 



Write us for F"ree Advertising 
Matter, Railroad Rates and Ex- 
cursion Dates. 



The Colorado Colony Co., 

sterling, Colorado. 



REFERENCES-Geo. L. McDonaueh. Breth- 
ren Colonization Agent U. P. R. R-. Omaha, 
Neb.; Eld. D. D. Culler. Principal Sterling Public 
School; Rev. A W. Russ. Brethren Church. 
Sterling. Colo.; any bank or business house. 



THE COLONY 



...ON... 



LAGUNA DE TACHE GRANT 



.IN THE... 



SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 



Come and See It. r- 



Do you want to buy or rent an 
irrigated farm in the 

South Platte 
Valley 

Where people are prosperous 
and contented? 



The climate guarantees health. 
Irrigation means big, sure crops. 
Denver and the great mining 
■camps near by, pay good prices 
for everything you raise. 



Sterling's population is i,8oo, 
and growing. A town of churches 
and schools. No saloons or places 
of iniquity. Three railways, Union 
Passenger Station, water works, 
electric lights, etc. 



4tl3 



Mention the INGLENOOK wilcn writing. 




BRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
F. Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of 1901 
dnd were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 

1902, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19, 1902, a Brethren church was organized with a membership of 13. 
There are now 54 members. 

May II, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8, 

1903, the building shown above was completed and on July 12, 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by forty in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
they will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
ister is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all, 
IS here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies of Cali- 
fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
forty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
lay in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
newspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

5ltl3 Mention the INfiLKNOOK when writing 



■HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



ARE YOU QOINO 



..TO... 



..CALIFORNIA... 

Lordsburg, the Lagnna De Tache 
Grant, Troplco 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

...Union Pacific Railroad... 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, 
Utah and California Points. 



READ THIS. 



Glendora, CaL, Jan. 5th, 1904. 
Yes, I am here, and I came here over the Union Pacific 
Route, and I am free to say that the scenery along that 
line, especially for two or three hundred miles before ar- 
riving at Sacramento, Cal., excelled anything I have ever 
seen in all my travels. It is an inspiration — view it as 
you may. Here the Bible student drinks deep from the 
fountain from whence the Bible came. The scientific 
student here enjoys a rare feast. These things show the 
handiwork of the greatest artist. A. Hutchison. 



One-Way Colonist's Rates. 

To California Every Day, March i to April 30. 

From Chicago $33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River, 25 00 

Proportionate Rates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 



IS KNOWN AS 



"The Overland Route" 

And is the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or 

E. L. LOMAX, Q. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



A TOWN WITH A FUTURE 

— -* 

Snyder, Colorado, Has all the Ear-marks of a Comer and 

is Surely Destined to be One of North- 

Eastern Colorado's Leaders. 



A few years ago the Colorado Colony Company, an in- 
stitution that has been very successful in colonizing the 
fertile irrigated lands of the South Platte valley, and 
helping to build up several of its towns, conceived the 
idea of starting a town at Snyder station on the Union 
Pacific Railway. At that time all the land around Sny- 
der was owned by one of the largest cattle companies in 
Colorado, but it has since passed into the possession of 
bankers, farmers and other investors who own 40 acre 
tracts. 

Snyder is beautifully located on the South Platte riv- 
er and Union Pacific Railway, between Sterling and Den- 
ver, extending from the river to the brow of a mesa, 
one-half mile away. The main street running north and 
south, is 80 feet wide; all other streets, 60 feet; alleys, 20 
feet; all lots are 25x125 feet, excepting those fronting on 
the main street, which are 25x120. 

Two years ago the Cooper irrigating canal was built, 
passing' within one mile of Snyder. Last year the Farm- 
er's Canal was constructed, running directly through the 
town and this spring work is being pushed on the big 
Reagan Canal and Reservoir System, which will irrigate 
several thousand of acres of land in the mesa and valley 
back of Snyder. 

The settlement of these lands will mean more people, 
more business houses, more residences and a rapid in- 
crease in values of Snyder property. 

There is seldom much money made in buying high 
priced lots in a "boom town" that has overgrown its 
natural size and capacity and is ahead of the country, but 
such is not the case with Snyder. 

This little town with a bright future already assured 
has three general stores, two hotels, one lumber yard, 
blacksmith shop, livery stable, coal and grain dealer, con- 
tractor and builder, post office, depot and large stock 
yards, etc. There are good openings for a doctor and 
druggist, furniture store, meat market, newspaper, etc. — 
Advocate, Sterling, Colorado. 

The following parties have bought land near Snyder,. 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner Hygiene, Colo. 

W. W. Keltner North Dakota. 

A. W. Bray ton Mt. Morris, 111. 

Daniel Grabill LeMasters, Pa. 

J. L. Kuns McPherson, Kans. 

D. L. Miller Mt. Morris, 111. 

Daniel Neikirk LeMasters, Pa. 

Galen B. Royer Elgin, 111. 

E. Slifer, Mt. Morris, 111. 

I. B. Trout, Lanark, 111. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping off at Sterling, Colo., 

niVP FAPF **'"* $*-<»o, for the Round Trip First 
UllC rAllCi and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



J W^ A 1_I /~V is the best-watered arid State in America. Brettiren are moving there because hot winds, 
I I 9 r\ I i V-/ destructive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate it makes life 
bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in wkat Idaho has to oSer to the prospective settler and if you have in mind a change 
for the general improvemeat in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, 
we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that 
is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions te answer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad tares to 
investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see for your- 
self. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 

Settlers' One=way Rates from March 1 to April 30, 1904. 

FROM To Pocatello. Huntington, 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa, etc. 

Chicago, $30 00 $30 50 

St. Louis 26 00 27 50 

Peoria, 28 oo 28 50 

Kansas City and Omaha 20 00 22 50 

Sioux City 22 90 25 40 

St. Paul and Minneapolis 22 go 25 40 



It fl 
11 










MODEL RANCH, IDAHO. 



Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. 
Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. 



Fine § 



S Nampa, Idaho 

J2 I came to Idaho two yean igo from the best part of eastern Kansas. 1 had done no work for a year oa ac- ^ 

^ coant of poor health. One year here brought me all right and this year I farmed and made more money from ]^. 

^ 80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my 

^ bushels per acre. 



potatoes were ahead, making 600 ^ 
Joshua James. ~ 



^ S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 
X J- H- QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



D. E. BURLEY, 

G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R., 

Salt Lake City, Utah. 



Mention the INOLENOOK when writmi. 



'5>ffy^>'f>(fy'f>'fX'f>(f>'fyff^'f\ff\'n'fVf\'fVf^(t^'f^'fVfVf^'f*'<VfVf^'fvt^'f*'fVfii^^ 



fel KSL-E-KOOK 



Vol. VI 



February 9, 1904. 



No. 6. 



OUT OF MY SELF. 



Out of my selfish self, 
Oh, lift me up! 
To live for others, and in living so, 
To bear a blessing wheresoe'er I go; 
To give the sunshine, and the clouds conceal. 
Or let them but the silver sides reveal. 

Out of my lonely self, 
Oh, lift me up! 
Though other hearts with love are running o'er. 
Though dear ones fill my lonely home no more. 
Though every day I miss the fond caress, 
Help me to join in others' happiness! 

Out of my doubting self, 
Oh, lift me up! 
Help me to feel that thou art always near. 
E'en though 'tis night, and all around seems drear. 
Help me to know that though I cannot see. 
It is my Father's hand that leadeth me! 

*> ♦ ♦ 
JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



Avoid causing yazvns. 
To be happy, be helpful. 

The humblest is the highest. 

Creed never covered character. 

Truth and tricks are strangers. 

Fast living is liked by the devil. 

There is no label needed on love. 

Despise not the woman's counsel. 

Before reformation comes information. 

Everyday use never wears out religion. 

To him who is good there is good in all people. 



A real Christian never needs a certificate to that ef- 
fect. 

* 

IVisdom is best zvhen it comes through personal ex- 
perience. 

* 

La.-jiness is sometimes at the bottom of chronic in- 
validism. 

* 

Man measures by the mistakes we make, God by 
our motives. 

* 

Heroism often rises from the lower levels of the 
social fabric. 

* 
It takes a very smart man to write a letter that 
says nothing. 

* 
Ten cents worth of help is worth more than a dol- 
lar of argument. 

When one begins to edit the Bible to suit himself he 
is unsafe as a leader. 

Do not brood over the past or dream of the fu- 
ture, but pitch into the present. 

* 
Before you put your words in ink, 
Take, take time to stop and think. 



The salaried minister usually produces a squint, one 
eye on the sermon and the other on the collection. 

Don't get proud over the crowd of friends you seem 
to have. A bigger crowd zvould meet to see you 
hanged. 

* 

A married man who tries to fiirt is about as ridicu- 
lous as a woman who tries to look coy after reach- 
ing the double chin period. 

Many a man who waxes eloquent when recommend- 
ing his favorite cough cure becomes singularly mute 
when he gets around to his religion. 



122 



the: ingleinook. 



THE CULTURE OF GINSENG. 



A GREAT deal of publicity has been given to the cul- 
tivation of ginseng as a means of profit to people so 
situated that they can grow it. To read some of 
these advertisements one would imagine that a fortune 
was within easy reach of him who undertook growing 
the plant. In order to help to a better understanding, 
the Inglenook presents the subjoined article on the 
subject. It is the vital part of a little pamphlet, bear- 
ing on its face the title, " How to Grow Ginseng," 
published by Hiroshi Mori & Co., Chicago, III. Price, 
one dollar, and copyrighted. This firm has now 
changed its name to the Pacific Trading Co., 56 Fifth 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

We secured permission to reprint this article and 
reproduce it here to show the Nook reader what is 
ahead of him if he undertakes to grow ginseng. Pre- 
sumably this pamphlet is correct in detail, and those 
who have the ginseng fever would do well to study it 
carefully before undertaking the growing of the plant. 
Those who have tried growing it will be welcome to tell 
their experience in the Inglenook. It is not a ques- 
tion of seed or experience up to a certain point, but who 
has succeeded in making it a paying crop, and if so, 
how? Here is what the pamphlet says must be done 
to succeed : 

During August or September prepare the seeds by 
washing them carefully and letting them soak in clean 
water for twenty-four hours. Mix with plenty of 
sand and put in an earthen pot with a perforated bot- 
tom. 

Next, dig a hole in a shady spot, and fill it to the 
depth of three inches with twigs, bamboo, or wet sand, 
and cover with a straw mat. This, together with the 
holes in the pot, is for drainage. Place the pot of 
seeds on the mat so that the top is about on a level 
with the surface of the ground, and fill it with earth. 
Cover the top of the pot with a mat, and sprinkle oc- 
casionally to keep the seeds moist. 

In the middle of November take the pot out of 
the ground and examine its contents. Take the germ- 
inated seeds (those that burst open), mix with sand 
as before, put them back in the pot and bury it in the 
ground. Sprinkle as before and wait until the middle 
of March, when the seeds should be taken out of the 
pot and sowed in a prepared bed. 

Spade up the ground you have chosen for the pur- 
pose, and make a ridge six inches high, eight feet 
wide and any length, facing northwest (the direction 
not particularly important). 

Fertilize the ground thoroughly with the following- 
preparation : Make powder of hazelnut leaves and 
mix this with rich, black earth containing much or- 
ganic matter, and let the mixture decompose for six 
months or a year. 



After this fertilizer is spread over the ground, level 
carefully and make the holes for the seeds — 60x22 
in each 8 feet square, ;'. e., 1,320 holes in the same 
space. Make the holes with a board in which have 
been fastened wooden nails about the size of a lead 
pencil and an inch and a half long. 

After the bed is prepared drop a single seed in each 
hole and cover with a little earth. Now cover the bed 
with cane screen or mat, or something of that nature, 
and keep the ground moist, but not too wet lest the 
seed rot. 

In two weeks a small sprout should appear. At 
this time it is necessary to cover the young plants 
with a roof inclined from three or four feet high on 
the north to two feet on the south. 

In Korea, bamboo or cane screen is used for this 
roof. The plants must be protected from the sun and 
rain on the sides, also by screens or curtains. Great 
care must be taken for the first year, but a little sun 
will do no harm. The front shade should be let down 
every morning when the sun rises and rolled up at 
night when the sun sets. The screen at the back is 
not moved. When it rains, leave the shades down. It 
is important to water the plants regularly every day 
or every second day ; morning or evening is the best 
time for this. 

In Shondo, Korea, beds are eight feet wide by sixty- 
four feet long, and are each covered by one roof, with 
a path fifteen inches deep between the beds. 

At the end of one year, i. e., one year after the 
germinated seeds are sown in the bed, dig out the 
young plants, select good, strong roots, and trans- 
plant. Set the plants in rows 4x8, or thirty-two 
plants to each eight feet square. Even after the second 
year the roof should remain, but no special protection 
on the sides against rain is necessary. Let the plant 
grow naturally. 

Transplanting must be continued every year until 
the fourth. After the second year blossoms appear, 
but these should be picked ofif. It is in the fourth year 
that the plants grow most rapidly, and this is the best 
time for saving seeds, if any are desired. 

The crop matures by the fifth or sixth year. In 
Korea it is generally thought that the seventh year is 
the best time to dig the roots, but the farmer must 
decide for himself whether the increase in value wilt 
pay for the extra time. 

When the roots are dug the rootlets must be cut otT. 
Then wash the roots in clean water and place them 
in a coarsely braided straw basket (bamboo basket 
used in Korea). Take this to the steaming room, and 
place in a steamer over an iron kettle full of boiling- 
water. In Korea the steamer is usually made of earth- 
enware. Cover closely and steam for one hour. Then 
take up the roots and see if they are thoroughly 
steamed. The night is the best time for this. Hold 



!■ 



the: ingleinook. 



123 



the roots before a candle, and if they are transparent, 
like tortoise shell, they are all right. If there are any 
spots, steam again until these disappear. 

After steaming, spread the .roots on a tray and dry 
o\er a charcoal fire. Let the heat be considerable at 
first, and gradually diminish. Turn the roots frequent- 
h' while drying.' When nearly dry it is best to lay 
them in the sun to give the ginseng a glossy appear- 
ance. In Korea a special drying apparatus is used, 
but almost any fruit-drying apparatus will do. The 
important point is to dry evenly. Prices are deter- 
mined largel}' by the dr\-ing. When the roots are 
dried, wrap them in paper and keep them from all 
moisture. Ginseng dried according to this process 
should be of a golden color. It is called red ginseng, 
and is mostly used for export trade. Those roots in- 
tended for home consumption are simply washed and 
dried in the sun. They are called white ginseng from 
their color. 

Drying reduces the weight about two-thirds. In 
the best quality a pound and half of the dried roots 
is made from twenty to thirty raw roots, and the 
more roots to a pound and a half the less the value. 

When ginseng is ready for market, the roots must 
be classified according to size. For either the Korean 
or Chinese market the classification is made in the fol-. 
lowing way: 

!No. of dried roots per Kin.* Name of Class. 

20 to 30 Class 20 

30 to 40 Class 30 

40 to 50 Class 40 

50 to 60 Class 50 

60 to 70 Class 60 

etc., etc. 

Class 20 contains the best roots and brings the high- 
est price. According to the report of the Japanese Con- 
sul General at Shanghai, China, Korean ginseng, Class 
20, was quoted at $10.50; Class 30, $8.50; Class 40, 
$6.30; Class 50, $4.60, etc. At the same date Ameri- 
can wild-grown ginseng brought a price of $9.00 for 
the best grade. After classifying, wrap the roots and 
put up in tin boxes for sale. 

*Kin corresponds to a little more than one pound and 

a half. 

* * * 

EARLY COOKS. 

The earliest record of actual cooking is mentioned 
in the book of Genesis, i8th chapter, which says in vers- 
es 5 to 8 : " And I will fetch a morsel of bread. 
And Abraham hastened into the tent unto Sarah, and 
said. Make ready quickly three measures of fine meal, 
knead it, and make cakes upon the hearth. And Abra- 
ham ran unto the herd, and fetched a calf, tender and 
good, and gave it to a young man, and he hastened to 
dress it. And he took butter and milk, and the calf 
which he had dressed, and set it before them, and he 
stood by them under the tree and they did eat." 



The baking of cakes at that period was effected in 
hot ashes on the hearth, which method we find has been 
in practice as late as the tenth century. 

In the infant age of the world, when the new in- 
liabitatits contented themselves with simple provision 
of nature (vegetable diet), the fruits and production of 
the teeming ground, the art of cookery was unknown. 

But man passed from a vegetable diet, and fed on 
flesh, fowls and fish ; then seasonings grew necessary, 
both to render it more palatable and savory, and prob- 
ably salt was the first seasoning discovered, for of salt 
we read in Genesis 14: "'All these were joined to- 
gether in the vale of Siddim, which was in the salt 




THE STAND OF WHEAT ON .\ WESTERN PR.'MRIE. 

sea." And thence proceeded the soups and savory 
messes ; so that then cookery began to become a science. 
Thus we read that Jacob made such palatable pottage 
that Esau purchased a mess of it at the extravagant 
price of his birthright. And Isaac, before by his last 
will and testament bequeathing his blessing to his son 
Esau, required him to make some savory meat, such 
as his soul loved. As for the method of cookery of 
those times, boiling or stewing seems to have been the 
principle, and it is presumed scarce any other was 
used for two thousand years or more. But cookery 
did not long remain simple, for i Sam. 8 states : " And 
he will take your daughters to be confectioners and 
bakers." The Jews wanted to be fashionable and live 
like other nations, and the art of cookery has been ever 
since improving. — Steward and Housekeeper. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

It stands not with the munificence of a boimtiful 
God to be indebted to his creature ; we cannot give him 
aught unrecompensed ; there is no way wherein we can 
be so liberal to ourselves as by giving to the possessor 
of all things. — Joseph Hall. 

♦ ♦ * 

Only what we have wrought into character during 
life can we take away with us. — Humboldt. 



124 



the: inglenook. 



TIMBER CRUISING. 



When we hear a " cruiser " spoken of we generally 
think of a sea-going vessel, but in the Pacific northwest, 
as in other timbeied parts of the United States, a 
cruiser is a person who walks over timbered land for 
the purpose of estimating how many feet of all market- 
able kinds of timber there is to the acre, forty acres or 
quarter section. As the timbered parts of Oregon 
and Washington are as yet very little settled and con- 
sequently few houses built, the cruiser must be pre- 
pared to camp out. If a large tract of land is to be 
cruised and a large party of men sent out a cook is 
generally engaged — often a Japanese. Tents are tak- 
en along, and perhaps a horse on which to carry sup- 
plies, but if the tract is small and only one man re- 
quired to cruise it, then the preparations are different. 

He does not usually take a tent, but simply some 
heavy blankets in which he rolls himself at night and 
sleeps on the bare ground wherever he happens to be 
when his day's work is over. Besides his blanket he 
usually takes at least three cooking utensils — a small 
frying-pan, a folding tin cup and a tiny coffee pot. 
He rides by rail, trolley, stage, boat or horse as near 
to his destination as he can get, then walks the rest of 
the way, laying in at the last store he passes such sup- 
plies as he needs. If he is a good marksman he will 
probably have his gim along, for the woods abound in 
bear, deer, pheasants, squirrels and other game from 
which he can replenish his larder. 

There are also delicious mountain trout in the upper 
courses of the streams, while the wild blackberries, 
raspberries, huckleberries, thimbleberries. salalber- 
ries, elder berries and salmon berries afford him ample 
dessert in their season, if he has time to gather them. 
Unless he is exceedingly familiar with the locality 
where he e.xpects to work, he must have a compass 
man along. The compass man, as his name implies 
carries a compass for the cruiser, so that he may not 
swerve from the right direction. 

Once on the ground, the method of working is some- 
thing like this : The cruiser finds a section comer of 
the land he is about to estimate, as it has been marked 
by the surveyors. This marking may be on a stone, 
stump, tree, etc. It tells the township, range, and di- 
rection. Taking this for his base, the cruiser strikes 
out into the woods. He is usually supplied with a 
prepared book or blanks on which to make his report. 
Stepping a certain distance into the woods, he makes 
an estimate of the trees about him. He counts how 
many trees there are above a certain size and of a 
marketable variety. He knows how to estimate the 
amount of lumber a tree of a given size will cut, and so 
he calculates how many feet, or thousand feet of lum- 
ber there is in this area, making allowance for waste 
from rotten, dead tops and branches, burns, etc. .\11 



below the standard size is classed as piling. When 
he has thus estimated the first plat, he steps a certain 
distance again after his compass man and calculates 
the next plat. So he goes over the whole thing. 

Then in the evening by his campfire, or after he has 
returned to town, he gets his reports in shape. The 
timber cruiser's report books or sheets usually have on 
each page blank spaces on which to write the number 
of feet of each kind of timber, the quality of the tim- 
ber and the amount of piling. There is often also a 
diagram of a section (640 acres) or a quarter (160 
acres) of land. On this he sketches roughly the hills 
and streams of the land and shows just where the 
heaviest timber stands and other valuable details in re- 
gard to it. There is also a space for remarks in which 
he makes such entries as these : " Land level and easy 
to log," " very rocky," " not much underbrush," " bad 
burn," " would make good farming land if the timber 
were off," etc. The report must, of course, contain an 
accurate description of the land, giving the township, 
section and range. The amount of timber on 
the land is given by forties. For example, he 
would say that there were so many thousand 
feet of spruce on the northeast forty, so many thousand 
feet of fir, etc. Each forty is thus described and at the 
end of the report the totals are given for the whole sec- 
tion or quarter, keeping the different species of trees 
and the piling separate. Each sheet or page of a tim- 
ber cruiser's report book is intended but for one section 
or quarter. 

\\'hen the cruiser has gotten his report in shape, he 
presents it to the owner of the land or whoever sent 
him to cruise the land, together with his expense bill, 
and receives as compensation for his services, usually 
about $5 per day for himself and $3 per day for his 
compass man. Traveling expenses and food supply 
bills are also paid by the employer. The qualities 
which a good cruiser should possess are a robust body, 
some knowledge of surveying, an understanding of the 
trees in the locality to be cruised, and quickness and 
accuracy in figures. The best months for cruising in 
the mountainous regions of Oregon and Washington 
are July, August and September, for then there is not 
usually snow to interfere. 

Just now is the golden age of the timber cruiser in 
the northwest. People have been flocking from the 
east during the past year and from the cities and towns 
of Oregon and Washington to acquire timber lands. 
In taking up 160 acres of government land it is neces- 
sary for the person to be on each forty acres, but 
the average person, unacquainted with the woods, 
would be hopelessly lost in twenty minutes if he at- 
tempted to examine a quarter section of timber, in the 
" backwoods " land without an experienced woodman 
for a guide, so cruisers are employed to locate persons 
on vacant government lands. For a sum varying from 



xhe: ingleinook. 



125 



$50 to $1 10, a cruiser will take a person onto each forty 
of a claim and give him an estimate of the timber 
on it. 

The trees with which the timber cruiser must make 
himself familiar are the various kinds of fir, spruce, 
hemlock, pine and cedar. Fir is the most common in 
Oregon, being found in nearly all parts of the State. 
The distribution of these various species of ever- 
green is somewhat peculiar and hard to explain. Only 
in Coos and Curry counties, Oregon, is found the finest 
grade of the white cedar, named from the port from 
which much of it has been shipped, Port Orford cedar. 
Why this cedar is not found growing in other parts 
of the northwest, nobody knows. Sugar pine is found 
only in southern Oregon. The famous California red- 
wood is found also in the extreme southern part of 
the State. 

One interesting fact that the cruiser notes as he 
tramps about through the woods is how very few song 
birds there are in the northwest forests. One would 
think where there are so many trees and such a mild 
climate there would be an abundance of feathered 
songsters, but such is not the case. There are many 
different species to be found, but not one species is 
found in great numbers, as in the States of the Mis- 
sissippi valley. One may travel for hours through the 
woods here and see or hear scarcely a bird, Perhaps 
this is due to the great forest fires that rage nearly 
every summer in the northwest, and which must de- 
stroy great numbers of birds. 

One of these great forest fires does not always to- 
tally destroy the timber over which it passes. Only 
a very intense fire will burn clear to the heart of the 
great trunks of a cedar forest. Often the fire burns 
only the branches and the outside of the trunk. If 
these trunks be sawed immediately, often a very fine 
grade of lumber can be obtained, but they are liable 
to become wormy and rotten if not worked up at 
once. Cedar has the most enduring qualities because 
it is so fine grained that it is not readily penetrated by 
insects or flames. 

* ♦ ♦ 

ANIMALS GOOD WEATHER PROPHETS. 



It is a singular fact and one established beyond all 
doubt that birds and animals are much better weather 
prognosticators than man except when his calculations 
are based on the most elaborate data, while even then 
the guiding instinct of the inferior creation leaves him 
but little room to boast. On one occasion the great 
Sir Isaac Newton was passing over a lonely moor, far 
from any human dwelling, when he met a shepherd, 
who advised him to make for a place of shelter without 
delay, as rain was not far distant. Sir Isaac looked at 
the cloudless heavens, and, finding none of the usual 
signs of rain present, continued his journey. He had 



not gone any distance, however, before the rain poured 
down in such torrents that his respect for the plain- 
looking shepherd became boundless. Regarding per- 
sonal discomfort as nothing compared with the possi- 
bility of gaining a valuable scientific secret, he returned 
immediately to the man and asked by what means he 
had been able to predict rain. 

The shepherd pointed to a particular sheep, saying: 
" When that yow (ewe) turns her head the way she 
does now it's sure to rain." Perhaps there was noth- 
ing very wonderful here. The particular sheep may 
have been suffering from some peculiar djsease which 
the change in the atmosphere affected, just as it affects 
persons suffering from rheumatism or bunions, who 
can sometimes tell us with absolute certainty when we 
may expect rain. 

At the same time shepherds everywhere agree that 
sheep have a weather instinct. In winter, before a day 
of snow and drift, a whole flock has been known to 
leave the top of an exposed moor and travel miles to a 
sheltered place where the shepherds had formerly 
brought them for safety. This surely denoted a knowl- 
edge of the coming storm, as well as an intelligence 
which enabled them to prepare for it. Take man; a 
limited mental capacity in some things does not pre- 
clude great foresight in others, and in the animal cre- 
ation may not one talent be highly trained while the 
others remain inert? Indeed, some animals have, be- 
yond all doubt, an anticipating sense. During a thun- 
derstorm horses have been repeatedly known to shud- 
der an instant before the flash appeared, thus showing 
that they were made aware of its coming by a sense 
other than seeing or hearing. 

Some persons say that if the cat sits with its back 
to the fire a storm may be expected. When our little 
favorite friend, the robin, begins to make himself very 
familiar snow is usually not far away. The old 
rhyme — 

You are sure to rise with a watery head 
When the cock goes crowing to bed — 

generally proves true. Poultry keep up an unusual 
commotion the night before rain. They fight among 
themselves, the hens often crow and the preening of 
plumage is altogether in excess of what is common. 
Are they preparing for rain, or do the scales on their 
bodies become troublesome with the change in the at- 
mosphere? The forecasts of rain, indeed, are legion. 
When the ground is seen covered with gossamers, 
when the raven croaks in the morning, when the sea 
gull wheels high in the air and when the peacock is 
extra noisy, rain is certain to follow soon afterward. 
When swallows are here they fly low before rain, for 
the good reason that their prey, the flies, choose the 
lower regions of the air at such time, possibly to be 
near shelter when the shower comes. 



126 



the: ingl-einook. 



i»>»4^>».M ^ , ■ } . » » » . t . ■!■ ■ ! ■ .!■ » . t . » . ! ■ . ! ■ . t . ■ ! ■ - l . » .!• » » » » » » • ? ■ .!■ » ■>■ -t 't ■!■ » 't '!■ ■!' ■!■ ■ !■ * '!■ <■ < ■ ■ 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over the country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
takmg the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



ADDITIONAL NATURE STUDY CLUBS. 



No. 23, Laurel Hill Inglenook Nature Study Club of 
Vinco, Pa. Secy, Earl R. Harrison, Vinco. Pa. Member- 
ship 5. 

No. 24, Inglenook Nature Study Club of Maspn School, 
Gortner, Md. Sec'y, Miss Revie P. Miller. Gortner, Md. 
Membership 19. 

No. 25, Inglenook Nature Study Club of Reserve, Kans. 
Sec'y, E. Landes, Reserve. Kans. JNIembership 5. 
* ♦ ♦ 
A SAGACIOUS OLD HORSE. 



AIr. J. D. Haughtelin, one of the Nooker's best 
friends, of Panora, Iowa, writes that Frank Bond, of 
Pitzer, Madison county, Iowa, had an old horse that 
took his children a mile and three-quarters to school 
and then they turned him around and he took the cart 
home. Tliis he did so faithfully for one term that he 
was hitched to the cart and started toward the school 
in the afternoon. He went to the schoolhouse where 
he waited until the school was dismissed when the 
children went home with him. He made two trips a 
day for three years. Sometimes in turning a corner he 
caught a wheel at the post when he waited patiently 
until someone came along and helped him loose. 

COMMENT. 

There are quite a number of such instances on rec- 
ord, but there is always the element of danger in the 
whole proceeding. The horse does not know what he 
is doing with his limited amount of brain. He simply 
acquires the habit very much as the circus horse 
dances when the band begins to play. A loose leaf of 
the Inglenook in the road might have developed into 
a flock of wolves in the horse's brain and then the 
•neighbors would have been treated to a race, and the 
larger wagon would have come later and gathered up 
the pieces. 

Here in Elgin the old horse that stands in front of 
the store, untied, no matter how faithful he may have 
been, costs the owner a $2.50 fine when the police get 
sight of him. It has been demonstrated over and over 
again that it is the good old horse that goes down 
the street flying when something unusual happens be- 
fore his eyes. 

One evidence of the horse lacking the high sense 
that is usually attributed to him is that he subordi- 



nates all his strength, and all his intelligence, to that 
of the merest child who drives him. On the other 
hand we are always glad to have just such instances 
and our comment is intended to remove the common 
idea that it is unusual intelligence when it is nothing 
more than automatic habit that brings about the mat- 
ter. Send us another. 

♦ ♦ 4" 
EYES ENLARGE WITH AGE. 



A CONVERSATION with a prominent hatter developed 
the fact that among men of large affairs where decided 
executive ability and strong mental equipment was req- 
uisite, it was common to find an increase in the cranial 
development. A more detailed investigation among 
some of the large metropolitan hatters revealed the 
fact that many of them had, for years, by means of an 
automatic measuring device, kept records of peculiar- 
ities of the cranial outline of many of the prominent 
men, which had led to the discovery (to which, how- 
ever, little importance had been attached) that the skull 
often shows a decided increase in size after middle 
age. 

Thus, if it is a fact that the human eye depends 
largely upon the surrounding bony structure for its 
size and proportion, it can readily be seen that, in the 
case of an eye, which presents abnormal visual con- 
ditions, due to an inadequate development, the increase 
in the size of the skull referred to, accompanied as it 
usually is by generally improved physical conditions, 
would naturally tend to a corresponding increase in the 
size of the eyeball, thereby contributing to a possible 
neutralization of the visual defect. 
♦ <{• * 
A STUDY OF PUPPIES 



.\ LITTER of pure-bred St. Bernard puppies furnished, 
to a Germantown doctor recently, a good deal of enter- 
tainment. He studied the little dogs closely and kept 
a diarv of their gradual mental and physical develop- 
ment. Some of the entries from this diary follow : 

" First day — The pups' eyes and ears are shut. 
They weigh a little over a pound apiece. 

" Fourth day — Though they can't see, if they are put 
on the edge of a chair or on any other elevated place, 
thev crawl away from this danger point, led by in- 
stinct, T suppose. 



the: ingleinook. 



127 



" Sixth day — They smell a little. 

" Ninth day — They are still deaf. A gun fired be- 
side them doesn't waken them from sleep. 

" Eleventh day — Gave one a saucer of warm milk. 
It tried to drink, but couldn't lap quite right. 

■■ Thirteenth day — Their eyes are beginning to open. 
They stand better, and when they sleep they gTowl — 
a sign that they have dreams. 

" Sixteenth day — They begin to play a little. Still 
they can't hear. 

" Seventeenth da} — Hearing has begun. .\ hand- 
clap now is audible to them. 

Nineteenth day — For the first time they have barked. 

■' Twentieth day — Their teeth are appearing and 
they now wag their tails. 

■■ Thirty-sixth day — They will follow you. They 

will seize the hem of your trousers and your shoes. 

They bark at you and they wag their tails when they 

are pleased." 

•5* ♦ •> 

ACUTE VISION OF BIRDS. 



WONDERFUL SENSE OF SMELL IN DOGS. 



Birds have very acute vision — perhaps the most 
acute of any creature — and the sense is almost more 
widely diffused over the retina than is the case with 
man; consequently a bird can see objects sideways 
as well as in front of it. A bird sees — showing great 
uneasiness in consequence — a hawk long before it is 
visible to man. So, too, fowls and pigeons find minute 
scraps of food, distinguishing them from what appear 
to us exactly similar pieces of earth or gravel. Young 
chickens are also able to find their own food, knowing 
its position and how distant it is as soon as they are 
hatched, whereas a child only very gradually 
learns either to see or to understand the distance of 
an object. Several birds — apparently the young of all 
those that nest on the ground — can see quite well di- 
rectly they come out of the shell, but the young of 
birds that nest in trees or on rocks are born blind and 

have to be fed. 

♦ *> ♦ 

REMEMBER THIS. 



Heat is life, and cold is death. By looking at the 
thermometer just outside the window we see that it 
is ten degrees above zero at this writing, yet there 
are tens of millions of living things all about us that 
are alive and waiting. The first warm days will turn 
loose all their life-making functions. Doubtless a 
hundred degrees below zero would not kill some speci- 
mens of life, while heat much above a relatively low- 
high temperature will kill every thing, rendering it 
sterile, so to speak. 

It is thus that old people whose functions are low 
and whose organs are sluggish want to be warm, 
and the full-blooded active child plays comfortably in 
the cold. 



It has often been proved that dogs are able to track 
their masters through crowded streets, where it would 
be impossible to attribute their accuracy to anything 
except the sense of smell alone. Mr. Romanes, the 
naturalist, once made some interesting experiments as 
to this wonderful power as exhibited in his own dog. 
In these tests the naturalist found that his dumb 
friend could easily follow in the tracks of his master, 
though he was far out of sight, and that, too, after 
no less than eleven persons had followed, stepping 
exactly in the tracks made by Mr. Romanes, it being 
the deliberate intention to confuse the senses of the 
poor dog if possible. Further experiment proved that 
the animal tracked the boots instead of the man, for 
when Mr. Romanes put on new footgear the dog failed 
entirely. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

ANIMAL'S DEATH. 



It is very doubtful whether any animal knows about 
death. They see the dead, but not understandingly, 
and, of course, they have no personal knowledge of it 
and can have none. They are often frightened in the 
presence of immediate death, and rendered frantic by 
the strange appeals to their senses, but of the physical 
and moral relations of the occurrence they have no 



knowledsfe whatever. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



THE STORK. 



In Holland, the nests of storks are generally on the 
summit of a tall post put up on purpose for them, and 
on which is fixed an old cartwheel. They also nest 
on top of chimneys and roofs. They are never dis- 
turbed by natives and are regarded as welcome visi- 
tors. Has the stork ever come to your house? 
4* ♦ ♦ 

An albino deer, with a coat as white as snow and 
eyes a delicate pink, was killed in the Canyon moun- 
tains of southern Oregon recently. It was one of the 
very few albino deer ever seen in the mountains of 
the west. Old hunters tell of seeing them, usually 
separate from the main herds, at various times during 
the early days ; but they were too shy to be approached 
near enough for a shot. The deer killed in the Canyon 
mountains was with four other deer at the time it was 
found, and had not this been true the hunters would 
not have taken it for a deer. Its white coat made it 
far more conspicuous than the remainder of the herd 
and it is perhaps for this reason that albino deer are 
shunned by their mates. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The temperature of insects may be varied within 
wide limits and not destroy their vitality. 



128 



HI 



INGLENOOK. 



VEGETATION IN THE TROPICS. 



Down in the tropics the vegetation is peculiar to 
the country, and is something that the Inglenook 
reader can have no idea of unless he has seen it. In 
places the vegetation is so rank that it is not possible 
to get through it. Wlien the field is cleared off, the 
bu.shes are sometimes taken, and thrust in the vege- 
tation growing along both sides of the field as one 
would thrust brush through a paling fence, and the re- 
sult is in the end that the field requires no fences as the 
wall of vegetation is sufficiently strong in places to 
turn anything but monkeys, snakes, and very small 
animals. When this field is in shape it is plowed and 
seeded and then everything grows like mad. The 
growth over night is very noticeable, and, in the rainy 
season, ceasing work for a week would put the field 
entirely beyond the possibilities of cultivation. 

Vines and creepers grow with exceeding rapidity. 
While it is not literally true that you can see them grow, 
yet their growth is very perceptible over night. Every- 
thing gets into a mat of vegetation and the clearing if 
neglected is worse than the original forest. It is sim- 
ply impenetrable. 

People who live there can stand the climate, but if a 
thousand average Nook people went to this deep tropi- 
cal jungle, and remained there, the chances are that in 
five years not one of them would be alive. When they 
dug the Panama canal it was necessary to pay some of 
the men ten dollars a day to get them to stay. A dense 
fog would creep over the land sometime in the morning 
or night, known as " Creeping Johnny," and who- 
ever breathed that simply took poison. Natives who 
have been born there and who have become acclimated, 
seem to stand it all right but the American who goes 
down there takes his life into his hands, and, if he is 
going back in the interior, he would do well to bid 
his people good-bye before he penetrates the jungle, 
for death is on every hand. 

The beautiful flowers and the orchids of the tropics 
are something wonderful. Sometimes the orchids will 
attack a huge tree. As they grow by serial roots that 
reach around and grasp the tree trunk, they finally 
reach the top ends of the large limbs. The tree dies, 
rots out, and there are so many orchids with their 
roots firmly woven together that they stand up in tree 
form, not perfectly so, of course, for huge pieces break 
off, but in fact enough to show that the parasite has 
killed the tree. 

♦ •J ♦ 

THE NATURAL HISTORY OF PANAMA. 



Both Panama and Aspinwall are small places now, 
but when the canal gets in operation they will be 
among the busiest in the world. There is a railroad 
between the two, and it is said that this forty-seven 
miles of road cost a human life for every tie in it. 
The canal will cost more than this, and thousands of 
workers on it will die before it is completed. 

There are no towns in between the terminals, and 
the country is full of dangers, not only from wild peo- 
ple, but from natural causes. There is perhaps no 
place in the world where there is a broader and better 
field for nature study than in these' wilds, and it is a 
place of the utmost danger on account of fevers and 
death that lurk in every breath of air. 

The whole interior is a dense jungle, and it is said 
that the troops from Bogota, marching through this, 
could not make more than a mile a day. The trees, 
vines, and tangled growth cannot be understood till 
seen. Monkeys are in the trees, parrots fly screaming, 
from tree to tree, and every form of life is different 
from that we know in this country. It would be an 
ideal place, if it were possible, for the naturalist of 
the Nature Study clubs, but it would mean death to 
most to undertake it. 

4* ♦ <?• 

SOME Q. AND A. ABOUT BIRD MIGRATION. 



Naturally a good many Nookers know something 
of the tropics, but without having been there it is im- 
possible to understand the situation. The writer has 
never been on the Isthmus of Panama, but he has been 
in the tropics, and knows the conditions. 



Do all birds migrate? No, not all of them. Some 
stay the year round, the crow for example. 

Do birds start and complete their long north and 
south trips without stops ? No, the very opposite is the 
case. They move slowly southward revelling in the 
seeds of weeds as they travel. Night flyers feed dur- 
ing the day. 

Do they come north as slowly as they go south? 
No, their northern flight is more rapid, the nesting 
impulse urging them on. 

Could they be induced to remain in the north dur- 
ing the winter ? Yes, very largely, as it is a matter of 
food more than climate that takes them off. If food is 
provided for them, and they are neither killed nor 
scared off, most of them will stay. This has been 
proved by experiment. Have you not seen more birds 
in city parks than in the woods? Ready food is the 
reason. 

Does the mating of birds continue during migra- 
tion ? With some, yes ; in others, the most of them, no. 

Do migratory birds eat the same seeds, or not? 
No, for illustration blackbirds eat the seeds of the 
smartweed before any other varieties that may offer. 

Can birds be induced to make their home at a certain 
place, a given farm, for illustration? Yes, easily, 
if food is provided they will stay there. 

What is the very best way to keep birds near a 
house? Get rid of your house tiger known as a cat. 



'HI 



INOL-EINOOK. 



129 



BUTTERFLY IN WINTER. 



A FAMILY on West Park street has a pet butterfly 
' which is now three weeks old, and seems to consider 
', itself one of the members. Its chrysalis was depos- 
• ited on a window frame last summer, but the heat of 
' the room seems to have hurried the butterfly into ex- 
istence in the winter, when nature intended it to main- 
tain a comatose state until next June. This butterfly 
has bright brown wings, ornamented with black dots, 
and it flies about the room from one window curtain 
to another, with all the enthusiasm of a summer in- 
sect amongst the garden blossoms. The children feed 
it regularly once a day, by placing the point of a 
match that has been dipped in honey close to its pro- 
boscis. Although the wings have been battered some- 
what by concussion with the window panes, the little 
visitor bids fair to live its allotted period with the 
folks, and then to peacefully die of old age. The us- 
ual life of a butterfly is said to be six weeks. At night 
this insect has a little tin box all to itself, and sleeps 
with its wings crossed over his back, when it resem- 
bles a little sailboat on the river. 
* * * 
LOONS. 



Loons live almost habitually in the water in which 
they swim and dive with wonderful rapidity and skill. 
Perhaps no other bird can swim as far under water 

! as the loon and they beat almost all other birds as 

; divers. 

! They raise their young in the far north, and as 

j cold weather comes on, migrate southward. The nest 
is rudely constructed of weeds, grasses, etc., on the 
ground near the water. The eggs are of a dark color 
and are said to be two in number. This being the case 
it is evident that the loon is not a very common 
bird. 

♦ * ♦ 

LEAF CUTTING BEES. 



The leaf cutting bees are near relatives of the honey 
and bumble bees, which they closely resemble. They 
derive their name from the habit you have observed 
of cutting out bits of leaves for their cells. The cir- 
cular pieces are for the ends of the cells and the ob- 
j long pieces for the sides. These cells are usually in 
burrows cut into wood, for some of the leaf cutting 
bees, like the carpenter bees, have the talent of cut- 
ting holes into wood. — St. Nicholas. 
♦ ♦ *> 
WHY FROGS ARE COLD. 



Many boys have probably wondered why frogs are 
cold to the touch, and some of them look upon these 
little creatures with a sort of horror, believing that 
they have no blood. But such is not the case, for they 



have not oiil\- blood, but they possess nerves and can 
feel. Perhaps if this were more generally known 
there would not be so many heartless boys, who seem 
to take special delight in torturing frogs and toads. 
According to scientists, frogs are cold-blooded because 
they consume very little air. It is the same with fish- 
es. Without a plentiful supply of air there is not 
much animal heat, because combustion is slow. 
♦ + ♦ 
THE WHIP-POOR-WILL. 



The whip-poor-will, or the Antiostomtis vocifera is 
found all the way from eastern United States westward 
to the plains and south to Panama. It is not by any 
means the same bird as the nighthawk, though people 
are in the habit of confusing the two. Unlike the 
nighthawk it is never found in flocks and is seldom 
seen during the day unless accidentally discovered 
while it is sleeping. 

4^ -^ 4^ 

The circulation in plants is practically suspended 
during the winter months and then it is time to pre- 
pare them for spring planting, cutting off scions or pre- 
paring cuttings such as the grape, bunching them up 
like a bundle of cigars, and putting them in a damp 
place; in the case of the grape the best is damp sand. 
In fact, in the case of the cutting it is a more desirable 
way of propagating them than waiting until spring to 
make the cutting. No cutting will send out roots with- 
out first being calloused where the break is made. The 
whole cellular structure of the plant must change at 
that point and it is just as readily done in the cellar as 
in the ground and often to better advantage. They 
cannot be allowed to dry, however, and still retain their 
vitality. 

T V T 

An esteemed correspondent from Maryland asks the 
question whether any person was ever stung by a bum- 
blebee, wasp, or any other insect so as to lose the 
sight of an eye? Will some one who knozvs of such 
an incident please report the fact, giving the name, and, 
as far as possible, the circumstances? Hearsay is not 
wanted. Idle stories that have come to Nooker's ears 
are not actual facts seen by the individual. What we 
want in this instance is what somebody knows in re- 
gard to the matter. In short, does any Nooker know 
of anybody ever being stung by an insect so as to lose 
the sight of one or both eyes? 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Miss Minnie Zirkle, of San Angelo, Texas, a 
member of the Inglenook Nature Study Club, says 
that the horned toad hibernates in the burrows of ani- 
mals, and that they do not come out until several 
months later in the season. We are always glad to 
have nature study contributions of this character, show- 
ins: the habits of little-known animals. 



130 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



mlNSLtNnol^ 

A Weekly Magrazirie 



...PUBLISHED BY.. 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, LLL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Inglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited articles. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 



Brethren Publishing House, 



(For the Inglenook.) 



22-24 South Sute St. ELGIN, ILL. 



Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 



TWO PICTURES. 



I. 

An old farmhouse with meadows wide, 

And sweet with clover on each side; 

A bright-eyed boy, who looks from out 

The door with woodbine wreathed about. 

And wishes his one thought all day: 

"Oh! if I could but fly away 

From this dull spot the world to see, 

How happy, happy, happy, 
How happy I should be." 

n. 

Amid the city's constant din, 
A man who round the world has been, 
Who, 'mid the tumult and the throng, 
Is thinking, thinking all day long: 
" Oh! could I only tread once more 
The field path to the farmhouse door. 
The old green meadow could I see. 

How happy, happy, happy. 
How happy I should be." 

* * * 

LOVING AND HATING. 



It is probable that every human being is born into 
the world with capacities for both hating and lov- 
ing. Both the angel and the demon are in the sleep- 
ing child. Whether it grows up to be a good or a 
bad man depends almost wholly on which figurative in- 
dweller gets the upper hand in the affairs of life. If 
it is the angel that dominates, well and good ! If the 
devil wins, the whole life of the individual makes for 
bad. As to which wins much depends on environ- 
ment, and perhaps more on the individual himself — the 
way he is made. 



The facts, the real bottom facts, why one person 
is bad and another good, are very hard to discover. 
Two children, born of the same parents, raised under 
identical conditions turn out exact opposites. One 
becomes all he ought to be and the other is a drunk- 
ard, a thief and finally a murderer. Now who can tell 
why? The reasons are too deep or too remote to un- 
cover. We know that the black sheep will outcrop 
and he lives and dies that. The writer knows a min- 
ister, a good man, one whose probity and earnestness 
were never called in question. He raised a family 
who all did well, all save one daughter, who was as 
bad as bad can be. The bottom reason why will not 
be known till the last great day. 



Though we may not understand the why of these 
moral malformations there is one thing we can do 
that will go a long way, if not all the way, to cut out 
the evil that is in us. It is but one word, — love, a short 
and easy word, but standing for the greatest thing in 
this life. To a very large extent it is possible to feed 
the angel and starve the demon. The love habit can 
be cultivated. It can be watered by the dew of prayer 
and strengthened by the will till it thrives as a green 
bay tree that covers and hides the mushroom growth 
of hate. Love is heaven, hell is hate. Love is a 
dove, hate is a hawk. Love is a flower, hate a poison- 
ous weed. 



What is hate? Black-browed and sinister it watch- 
es askance the action it does not emulate, and im- 
peaches the deed it does not rival. Ever ready to de- 
fame, it praises none. It goes about with a poisoned 
tongue as savages shoot darts tipped with venom into 
wild animals. It sees no good, hears no song, sees 
no gleam of sunshine, but prefers the miasm of the 
shades and reviles the laugh and song of the reaper in 
the field. All its life it has no other thought than to 
belittle and defame. It is an obstruction in the way 
of all that is good, dies and is forgotten. 



.And what is love? The best definition of it was 
given long centuries agone when St. Paul defined it. 
It speaks no evil, thinks no evil, — mark that. It thinks 
no evil. Hopes for the best, seeks the pure and the 
good. It is a friend of all the angels, and tries 
hard to see good in even -the devils. It is a lamp in 
the window of this dark world of ours, lighting the pil- 
grim on his way heavenward. It loves the sunny side 
of the highway, and if need be to travel the dark side, 
it sings in hope. It is a benediction to all who come 
in the way of its influence, and when its possessor 
comes to the inevitable walk through the valley and 
the great shadow, it fears no evil, for it has not known 
it. 



So, then, life is not long enough in which to hate 
those about us. .\nd life is too short for him who 



HI 



INGL-ENOOK. 



131 



loves all things, all things, both man and beast, to 
complete his work here. When he has done his stunt 
the gods ordained, in the time in which he was to do 
it, he is called higher where Love rules and Hate is 
unknown. It is entirely possible to help ourselves in 
the love habit. Like any other habit, it grows on us. 
Come to seek the sunny side and the sunny side comes 
to .us. When the last silent night comes and there 
come trooping past us in review the good and the bad 
we did in this life, none will ever regret that he loved 
and hated not. 

* 4> ■* 

PNEUMONIA. 



At the Chicago JMedical Society meeting last week 
one of the physicians stirred up consideraBle comment 
by making the statement that there is no known drug 
that is of practical value in pneumonia. In the dis- 
cussion that followed, the facts were elicited that in the 
main the statement was true. It was said that the 
main factors in the recovery from an attack of pneu- 
monia are the resisting power of the patient and the 
care which he received. It was not deemed within the 
province of fact that any drug was of the slightest di- 
rect benefit in the treatment of the disease. Good 
nursing was held to be of great advantage, but it was 
said that no medicine which could be taken internally 
would effect a cure. 

According to this, if an old man or one who is weak- 
ened physically gets pneumonia, his chances of re- 
covery are verj' slight indeed, and in fact, in the case 
of the extremely aged they are nothing. 

It is one of those cases in which an ounce of pre- 
vention is worth many pounds of cure. While pneu- 
monia is, to a certain extent, an infectious disease, yet 
such precautions may be taken by those who are ex- 
posed to its ravages as to much lessen the chances of 
contracting the disorder. Once it has taken a good grip 
on the patient it will run its course without reference 
to drugs. Therefore, if any Inglenooker who reads 
this and finds himself the victim of pneumonia, it is 
well to remember that nourishing food, stimulants, 
and intelligent care are about the only things that will 
pull him through, and not even then unless they are 
backed by strong resisting powers personally. 

This does not mean that a physician should not be 
called in the first instance, for his suggestions may do 
wonders in resisting the inroads of the disease, but 
intelligent doctors know that their medicine is of very 
little value, and that like some other diseases there is 
more in the general health of the patient and the care 
which is taken of him than in anything that he can 
swallow. 

It was also said in the Chicago Medical Society that 
the increase of pneumonia was indirectly caused by 
the advance of medical science. The advance of med- 



icine in nearly every department of its practice pro- 
longs life. While this is true, perhaps, in a limited 
sense, yet the fact remains that pneumonia is more to 
be dreaded than consumption, and that those who are 
even threatened with it should exercise the greatest 
prudence and take every precaution known to them to 
ward off the disease. Once a person has had an at- 
tack of this " Captain of the man of death." even 
though he recover, it is liable to return again and 
again and in the end he is almost certain to suc- 
cumb. The old definition of pneumonia, that of a 
cold settled on the lungs, does not go far enough in its 
description, as it is a disease caused by germs which 
are not well understood. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 
THE WOMAN'S INGLENOOK. 



The articles for the women's issue of the Nook are 
nearly all in, and an excellent lot they are. It is not 
said in any spirit of flattery, or even compliment, but 
as a fact, that taken as a whole they surpass in merit 
the average of a similar lot prepared by men. When 
this issue is out, the editor predicts a very extensive de- 
mand for it. The contributions are neither silly, ef- 
feminate or unwomanly. People in this woman's is- 
sue are telling things. They are talking sense that will 
help anybody, and be worth while remembering. 
Many people could learn a great deal from these 
Nook women about making a readable special issue. 
A few articles are still required to complete the num- 
ber and the editor will be glad to receive them at an 
early date. 

■^ ■•$* ♦$•■ 

In this issue of the Inglenook, the correspondence 
school of letter writing begins and will be continued 
through a number of issues until the course is com- 
plete. This is a practical course which would cost 
every reader five dollars if it were taken through the 
correspondence schools, and we advise every Nooker to 
read it carefully. While we 'cannot teach ideas that 
will go into your correspondence, yet by following the 
instruction given in this course every person can ac- 
quire a good form, which is a great deal. Should any 
interested Nooker want to know anything as we go 
along, the Inglenook will take pleasure in answering 
all questions. Every part of it is important, and the 
articles should be read carefully. 

♦J* -ij* ♦J* 

The surest criterion of our advancing in real ex- 
cellence and perfection of character is our acquiring a 
disposition to think less of ourselves and of our own 
happiness and more of that of others. — Dr. Priestly. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

God's love is not rounded out until I respond to it. — 
Maltbie D. Babcock. 



132 



the: ingleinook. 



WHAT'S THE NEWS? 



The South has been havine- heavy snowstorms. 



An eighteen-year-old girl is in jail in Texas for 
bigamy. 

A Chicago woman after being married thirty years 
seeks a divorce. 

At Columbus, Ohio, there have been 560 cases of 
typhoid since Jan. i. 

The Thibetans threaten to fight the English troops 
now in their territory. 



The Illinois State Prohibition convention will meet 
May 25, at Springfield. 

The explosion of a boiler in an apartment building 
in Chicago injured five people. 

A cat show is on in Chicago where pussies of high 
degree are competing for prizes. 



The London theater people wear fire-proofed cloth- 
ing, even to the flimsiest article. 



The suffering of the poor in the large cities during 
the cold spell is something unheard of. 

The revolt among the Panama Indians has been 
closed by a satisfactory peace arrangement. 

The St. Louis World's Fair is to have a bank. 
Will it cash checks offered by strangers? 



Emperor William, of Germany, is forty-five years 
old, and celebrated his birthday last week. 



Miss Nanny Bryan, sister of William J. Bryan, of 
Lincoln, Nebr.. is sick with the peritonitis. 



It is said that garden seeds will be difficult to secure 
this year, as the crop is short and prices high. 



A street car wreck in St. Louis injured a score or 
more of people. Dense fog was the reason. 



Some of the Indians in the Indian territory object 
to their lands being allotted by the government. 

James Smith, a Wisconsin man, died after ten days 
of nose bleeding. Medical aid was of no avail. 



Window smashers are at work in Chicago. They 
break show windows at the stores, grab and run. 



A woman near Seattle, Wash., living near a lodge 
of Elks, has overheard and learned all its secrets. 



Jacob Allen, of Kansas, bought a gold brick for 
$10,000. It was a combination of tin and copper. 



Eight hundred men were thrown out of-em^oyment 
last week at the Illinois Steel Plant in South Chicago. 



Four men in a cage at Briar Hill coal mine, near 
Brownsville, Pa., fell 685 feet and were crushed to 
death. __^ 

Russell Leonard, of near Warsaw, Ind., sixteen years 
old, sleeps in the open air for consumption. It is a 
good idea. 

Two American doctors have gone to the Philippines 
to study the causes of tropical diseases. They will 
stay a year. 

Japan is said to be restive under the delay of Rus- 
sia in answering the last diplomatic note in regard to 
her intentions. 

The theater and show business generally have suf- 
fered greatly all over the country since the Iroquois 
fire in Chicago. 

The storage supply of eggs is exhausted in Chicago, 
and the chances are that Chicago people will learn 
what fresh eggs are like. 

The mints of the United States have been ordered 
to work overtime, as there is not enough gold coin for 
the government purposes. 

E. H. Crosby, Vice-President of the New York Veg- 
etarian Society, says that a strictly vegetable diet in- 
sures against appendicitis. 

It is said that by the use of radium magazines of 
powder can be exploded at long range. If this is true 
it will work on both sides. 



The Kaiser, on his birthday, which happened re- 
cently, stated that he did not know his true condition 
while sick for several months. 



The pope has expressed himself in favor of an anti- 
divorce movement embodied in an organization known 
as Tlie Daughters of the Faith. 



Three colored men, for assaulting a white woman 
at Wheeling, W. Va., got from five to twenty years 
sentence in six hours after the trial. 



An inventor is working on a plan whereby the tele- 
fphQOe will record the conversation which passes 
through it in the absenci nf its owner. 



Down in St. Louis they have had a fire scare at the 
theater which came very nearly stampeding the whole, 
lot, leaving death and disaster to record. 



Aid. Peter Wendling, of Chicago, worked for years 
as a butcher at the Stock Yards and he asserts that 
turkeys have been kept twelve years and chickens ten 
years, while eggs are kept for pract ic a U j^ un limjled. 
periods. • 



THE INGLEINOOK. 



133 



William Payne, serving a sentence of 25 years for 
murder, in a \Msconsin penitentiary, has written a 
drama, " The Ideal Girl," 



A steam-pipe at the Metropole Hotel in Detroit 
burst, with the result that three people are dead. The 
pipe was corroded and this caused the trouble. 

Peter Duryea, of New York, sixty years of age 
and a millionaire, has been sued for $50,000 for al- 
leged breach of promise by Sarah Maddern, an actress. 

A North Carolina family have had twins, a boy and 
a girl. The parents have named one Mark and the 
other Hanna. The original Mark has been duly noti- 
fied. 

Horace G. Burt, late president of the Union Pacific 
railroad, will start on a two years' tour of the world, 
going direct from Omaha and San Francisco to the 
East. 

A man by the name of Broadwell is fattening a steer 
for the World's Fair. It now weighs 2,800 pounds 
and the owner has been offered and refused $1,000 
for it. 

Mrs. Florence Maybrick, serving a life sentence in 
England, for murder, has been freed after fifteen years 
of earnest effort on the part of those who did not be- 
lieve her guilty. 

It has been found that while heretofore glass tubes 
have been used in the use of radium, the substitution of 
aluminum tubes will increase its power and strength 
a hundred times. 

John Von Shifferdicker, of St. Louis, has the habit 
of chewing his cud. His food returns to his mouth 
and is chewed again just as it is with a cow. The 
trouble is called merytism. 



The fear is growing in South Chicago that a great 
strike is impending at the Illinois Steel Company. 
It is rumored that between two and three thousand 
men will be affected by it. 



A woman at Ingallston, Mich., Mrs. Schrofrienk, 
died Jan. 27, aged 125 years. She was born in Prussia, 
and came to this country when she was one hundred 
Years old. 



A Kansas man was sued for slander, and judgment 
rendered against him for $3,000. The case rested up- 
on the expression of twenty words, and it therefore cost 
him $150 per word, for the story he told. 

To save railroad fare a Dakota man shipped his 
wife as baggage in a box, and she nearly froze to 
death on the platform owing to a two hours delay. 
She made her presence known and was released. 



Japan's demand of Russia, reduced into plainest 
terms, means that Russia shall not incorporate any part 
of China into the Czar's dominion. They may be 
fighting about it by the time this reaches the reader. 



Charles M. Schwab, the steel magnate, it has been 
discovered owns the patents for making the United 
States armor plate. Armor plate cannot be made with- 
out nickel and Schwab owns the cheapest methods of 
reducing the metal. 



It is said that the cost of President Roosevelt's en- 
tertaining at the White House is more than his salary 
amounts to. He is not a wealthy man, as those things 
go, and his entertaining has made serious inroads into 
his income. 

Whitaker Wright, the man who took poison in Lon- 
don on being convicted of crime and sentenced to seven 
years penal servitude for fraud, is now known to have 
taken cyanide of potassium. The police also found a 
loaded revolver on his body, 

Mrs. Mary C. Burke, of'New York, a wealthy aged 
widow, who is the owner of ilats, has been courted by 
sixty ambitious young men. She has selected one of 
them by the name of Barke, aged twenty-one years. 
Mrs. Burke will hereafter be known as Mrs. Barke. 



The University of Chicago is no longer a denomi- 
national institution. President Harper announced to 
the senior class that the University had dropped its 
denominational character. Mr. Rockefeller, who gave 
the millions when needed, is a Baptist. 



Up to this date the trial of the car barn murderers 
has cost nearly twenty-one thousand dollars. All the. 
jurors who have been selected thus far, with the ex- 
ception of eight, state that they are unfit to sit on 
the jury by reason of their opinions in the premises. 



Montgomery Robinson, editor of the Budget, Philo, 
III., aged sixty-nine, went to New Orleans to die, as 
he thought. He took along his burial clothes and con- 
tracted with an undertaker. He took a turn and is 
now getting well and concludes he will stay a while yet. 



The coroner's verdict at the investigation of the Iro- 
quois theater disaster in Chicago found the mayor of 
the city responsible. Now it appears that the finding 
was a mistake and that nothing will be done with the 
mayor in the premises. This is just about what think- 
ing people imagined would be the outcome. 



A doctor at South Bend, Ind., is attempting to pre- 
vent the infant of negro parents from reverting to the 
old type and color of the race. A room in a hospital 
is provided with red walls, and the ceiling, floor and 
everything is to be red, and no contrasting light will 
be permitted in the room. It is thought that this will 
have some effect on the color of the child. 



134 



THE INC3il_E:NOOK. 



DIAMOND STEALING. 



Over in the South African diamond country they 
have a great deal of trouble with the blacks who hide 
the diamonds about them and afterwards sell them. 
Here is how they work the colored man : 

" When the negro laborer has completed his term of 
service in the compound and is ready to leave he is 
stripped stark naked, his hands locked in a pair of 
large, fingerless mittens, and he is placed in a room 
under guard. Formerly the negroes sought to smuggle 
stolen diamonds outside the compound in their boots, 
hair, in cuts in the flesh, etc., but of late years they 
have taken to swallowing them. One negro, who was 
detained two weeks, holds the record of having swal- 
lowed the greatest number of diamonds that ever saw 
the interior of one man. 

" From the outset it has always been the policy of 
the guards to try and ascertain as quickly as possible 
who of the negroes have been guilty of theft and who 
have not, in order not to detain the honest ones any 
longer than possible. After many tricks and experi- 
ments had been tried and failed, they hit upon a 
scheme which has been in constant use ever since, by 
which means they in ninety-nine out of every one hun- 
dred cases are able to determine on the first of the 
seven days of detention who have swallowed dia- 
monds and who have not. This device is nothing more 
nor less than a large, old-fashioned brass telescope. 
The South African negro, heathen that he is, is the 
most superstitious being under the sun. He stands in 
fear and trembling of the white man's medicine, and, 
taking advantage of this trait, the guards of the com- 
pound have succeeded in making the negroes believe 
that by means of this telescope they are enabled to see 
all that passes or lies beneath their dusky skins. 
Therefore, the minute a lot of negroes have served 
out their time and are brought into the detention house, 
stripped as naked as the day they were born, one of 
the guards, armed with the telescope, starts at the 
head of the line and applying one end of the instru- 
ment to the stomach of the negro at the head of the 
line peers long and earnestly through the other, fre- 
quently shifting the head of the instrument about as 
though bent on exploring every nook and cranny of 
the Kaffir's interior. 

" While this is in progress another guard stands by 
watching intently the plav of the negro's features. It 
is an ordeal somewhat similar to what the police of our 
large cities teiTn the ' third degree.' The negro is so 
thoroughly convinced that the white man is able to see 
every part of his interior, diamonds and all, that often- 
times he breaks down and confesses then and there, 
while in other cases where guilty parties make no con- 
fession, the guard who stands looking on, while the 
other manipulates the telescope, is able to judge who 
are guilty and who are not, by taking note of the 



frightened and terror stricken expression on the faces 
of those undergoing examination. You may talk 
about whipping and torture, but I venture to say there 
is nothing in the whole of South Africa which the 
negroes dread and fear quite so much as the De Beers 
company's old brass telescope. I don't know whose 
idea or invention it was ; whether it was another mas- 
ter stroke of the superior mind of Rhodes or the simple 
device of some boss or guard ; but it certainly does the 
work. There is, or rather, there was, about three 
years ago, a fellow who kept a hotel in Cape Town, 
who formerly had been a guard in the company's em- 
ploy, and who took to photographing the negroes in 
the detention house during the telescope ordeal. He 
had a large scrapbook full of such pictures, and they 
were the attraction of Cape Town. I never in all my 
life saw such ludicrous expressions of fear and terror 
as upon those of the negroes shown in these photo- 
graphs, undergoing what the guards used to call 
' searching for the truth with a telescope.' " 

♦ 4* 4* 
SENSITIVENESS TO PAIN. 



It has often been remarked that even delicate, re- 
fined women bear pain with a patience and fortitude 
unknown to men. Physicians, surgeons, dentists and 
others have commented on the fact, and great credit 
has been reflected on what is usually termed "the 
weaker sex " for their heroism in regard to pain. 

It now comes to light that women are less sensitive 
to pain than men ; they actually feel less of it in a 
given operation. A European scientist of distinction 
has been making careful experiments in this direc- 
tion, and after a large number of tests at the top of the 
forefinger he has come to the conclusion that women 
are not more than half as sensitive to pain as men are. 

This accounts now for the howling and groaning to 
which men are given when anything is the matter- 
with them. The impatient wife has often complained 
that her husband fussed more over a small cut, hardly 
skin deep, or a slight swelling than she did over mat- 
ters that were of a serious and even dangerous char- 
acter. 

The instrument for measuring pain tells the truth. 
Women are not suffering in silence the torture they 
were supposed to keep to themselves. Their heroism 
is not to be denied, but credit is not to be given for the 
long-suffering formerly supposed to be a part of their 
very nature. 

On the other hand, when men are writhing in a 
paroxysm of agony over what seems to women mere 
nothing at all. compassion and sympathy will hence- 
forth be extended to them, knowing their delicate sen- 
sibility to pain and the real amount they suffer as re- 
corded by the truth-telling instrument. — Chicago 
Chronicle. 



the: ingleinook 



135 



WOULD NOT HOLLER AGAIN. 



THERMOMETER AT NINETY BELOW. 



On one of his trips west Frederick Remington, the 
artist, made the acquaintance of a cowboy who was 
called by his associates " Hollering Smith." In ap- 
pearance the man was t_vpical of his kind, and Mr. 
Remington made several studies of him, both in re- 
pose and when in his favorite pastime of " hollering." 
Later, when back in his studio, the artist embodied 
a rather close portrait of the exuberant Smith in sev- 
eral drawings for a magazine, most of them showing 
him in a state of eruption. Later Mr. Remington 
again visited Mr. Smith's neighborhood, and on the 
afternoon of his arrival was approached by that worthy 



The coldest place on earth inhabited by man is Ver- 
khoyansk, above the arctic circle, in northeastern Si- 
beria. The thermometer there drops to 90 below zero 
in January, but sometimes rises to 86 above zero in 
the shade in July, dropping, however, to the freez- 
ing point on the warmest summer nights. The hottest 
place in the world is the interior of the great Sahara 
desert, in Africa, where the thermometer rises to 122 
degrees. The wettest place is Greytown, Nicaragua, 
where the mean annual rainfall is 260 inches. The 
place of least rain is Port NoUoth. in south .\frica, 
where less than an inch sometimes falls in a vcar. 




LOOKING AFTER THE POTATO CROP : HOMELY AND HEALTHY. 



bearing one of the pictures torn from the magazine. 
Pointing to the central figure, he said : 

" Say, is that me ? " 

"■ Well," replied Mr. Remington, guardedly. " I 
got the idea from you, of course, but " 

" Oh, it's all right," broke in the man; " no offense. 
If it's me just say so." 

" Well, yes ; it's a fairly close portrait of you." 

" That's what the boys at the ranch said. I look 
like that when I holler, do I ? " 

" I think you do." 

" Well," said the man as he slowly returned the leaf 
into his pocket, " if that's the state of the case then 
all I've got to say is that Hollering Smith has hollered 
the last holler that he'll ever holler. Hereafter when I 
celebrate I blow a tin horn. I don't consider that no 
man has a right to look like that — not around among 
white folks, at least." 



ASYLUMS FOR BIRDS AND BEASTS. 



Such is the reverence in India for certain birds and 
beasts that wealthy Hindoos have established homes 
or asylums for the aged and infirm among them. One 
of these, a few miles from Calcutta, has a staff of about 
eig'nty servants and an experienced veterinary surgeon. 
On festal occasions the cows in these asylums are deco- 
rated and feted by natives who travel long distances 
for the privilege. One of the established sights of the 
city of Bombay is the Pinjrapole, a spot where worn- 
out or diseased creatures are sent by benevolent Hin- 
doo citizens and there maintained until they die or 
are restored to health. 

♦ ♦ * 

Goose quill pens and drying powders are still used 
in English law courts and the house of lords and in 
the French chamber of deputies. 



136 



THE INGLENOOK. 



OUR CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL OF LETTER 
WRITING— No. I. 



In tht very start of this series of articles it is hardly 
necessary to call attention to the importance of the art 
of writing a letter in good form and in accordance 
with established usage. These things are pretty well 
understood everywhere, but in practice there is such a 
vast difference between different letter- writers as to 
lead one who does not know any better to think that 
the matter has never been reduced to a science, and 
that there is absolutely no established method of do- 
ing these things. 

The object of this series of articles is to show the 
reader what is correct and in good form, and he who 
studies this and wants to follow it in practice will 
be certain that what he is doing is right as far as 
it goes. That is, he will have the form right, no 
matter what his spelling or his grammar may be. 

A letter often tells us a great deal about people we 
have never seen. The way it is put together, how the 
subject is handled, its make-up in punctuation, para- 
graphing, forms of address, signature, tell the story 
and they reflect the character of the individual to a 
large extent. Some people imagine that the object 
of letter-writing is to convey information. This is 
true, but when they hold that it matters not how it is 
presented the}' are entirely wrong. This is just the 
same as saying that the great thing about a dinner 
you give to a friend is the quantity and not the qual- 
ity of the food, and that it makes no difference wheth- 
er it is served on china plates or shingles. It does 
make a difference and it is about the correct method 
of doing these things that we want to treat about 
in these articles. 

There are two or three classes of letters so far as 
writing is concerned. One of these is written with 
a pen by the hand of the party himself, another is 
written on a typewriter by the writer himself or 
by a stenographer; another is a circular letter copied 
to all alike. Clearly the written letter that has the 
autograph of the writer personally is the most valu- 
able of all. It shows care on the part of him who 
writes and a great deal more than a dictated letter. 
One can hardly imagine such a thing as a proposal 
of marriage dictated to a stenographer for the third 
person. A communication referring to the death of 
a mutual friend that is clearly a duplicate of many, 
loses its individuality and its force. But whether the 
letter is written by the typewriter or the pen, there are 
certain facts that ought to be observed, and which must 
be if the writer would be considered as doing the cor- 
rect thing. 

The great majority of people write their letters with 
a pen. Tliey do not have a typewriter or a ste- 
nographer but conduct their occasional correspondence 
with their own hands. The first thing we want to 



note with people of this class is the character of 
their stationery. To a great many people a sheet of 
paper is a sheet of paper, a pen is a pen, and ink is 
ink. A cheap tablet bought for a nickel at the coun- 
try store with a bunch of poor, cheap, thin envelopes 
and a bottle of weak ink, simply tells one of two stories, 
either that of abject poverty or of ignorance of the re- 
quirements of the occasion. In most instances, per- 
haps, it is indifference and the remedy is a matter of so 
much cheapness that it is within the reach of every- 
body. 

Let us first consider the matter of ink. No other 
than black ink should be used, ink which is either black 
at the start or which will turn black after being used. 
There is a difference between ink and writing fluid. 
Ink is ordinarily made as a solution of some coloring 
substance held in suspension. Freezing will not only 
break the bottle but will destroy the color of the ink. 
^Vriting fluid is a chemical combination which is not 
iiurt by freezing, but most of which will corrode pens 
after they are used if they are not cared for. For the 
occasional writer perhaps a good quality of writing 
fluid is best. 

In the matter of pens the correspondent should se- 
lect that kind which best suits his fancy and with 
which he can do the best work. As a rule a good steel 
pen will render better satisfaction than any gold pen 
ever made. There is a smooth, greasy feeling in writ- 
ing with a gold pen that does not seem to be do- 
ing the service that a clean steel pen will do. Those 
whose skill in penmanship has made them famous in 
that way, all use steel pens. Therefore, as a pre- 
liminary, we would recommend that a half-dozen dif- 
ferent kinds of pens be first bought, together with a 
bottle of good writing fluid. When put away the 
pen should be cleaned and cared for. Whether a 
pen be gold, silver, or anything else is a matter of 
individual taste and has no bearing whatever on the 
finished product of the letter. 

Now we come to the subject of stationery. Every- 
thing hitherto has been simplicity itself compared to 
this. The Inglenook recommends that every letter 
writer avoid the cheap paper of the ordinary stores. 
Nearly every store sells note paper and cheap envel- 
opes. Both of them should be avoided. There are 
people who deal in envelopes and paper and they will 
send their samples to all who ask, and from the samples 
choice should be made of the paper desired. As a rule 
colored paper and colored envelopes are good things 
to avoid. The best is plain white paper and a good 
quality of envelope. The best paper is always sold by 
the pound and can be sent through the mails. Con- 
sidering that a pound of paper will last an ordinary 
correspondent for a long time, and always be in good 
form, it is suggested that it be bought of the larger 
dealers for use as may be required. It will keep in 



HI 



iNGLEINOOK. 



137 



-Mod shape if kept in the dark, retaining" all its desir- 
able qualities. There arc hundreds and hundreds of 
different kinds of paper, but one cannot go wrong if 
he gets a good quality of medium white linen paper, 
which is never put up in tablet form, that is, the 
best quality is not, but, as stated before, is sold by 
the pound. A very good size is that which would 
about cover a printed page of the Inglenook, a little 
more or less. 

The envelopes should be heavy, tough, high-cut, 
and thoroughly adhesive. Thousands of dollars are 
lost every year through the use of poor envelopes, 
and for all the difference in the cost for those who 
write but little, the very best envelope should be used. 
There are hundreds and hundreds of varieties of en- 
velopes varying in style, color, and make, but an ordi- 
nary heavy linen envelope, that will not allow the con- 
tents of the letter to be read through it, is perhaps 
the best for general use. 

Whether or not the paper should be ruled depends 
on the individual. As a common thing the unruled 
is what is used. A sheet of black, ruled blotting pa- 
per laid under the sheet will answer for ruling with 
those who are not able to use the unruled with a 
pen. For typewriter purposes ruled paper is never 
used. 

Now suppose that the learner has all these acces- 
sories before him, and sits down to write a letter. 
j (to be continued.) 

* * »:♦ 

\ TAFFY. 



thing somebody has said about him. Tell him how 
much you admire something he has done ; and when 
you can sit down alone with him, take his hand, and 
tell him how much you love him ; don't be afraid of 
overdoing it. We all like to be told we are loved, and 
the saying it makes it all the truer. It is a great deal 
better to cultivate one's love with warm expressions 
than to blight it with frost. Pretty nothings? Why, 
they are big realities, the stuff happiness feeds on. 
Give us more taffy. — The Independent. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 
MAP MAKING. 



If there is friction, out with the oil-can. If there 
is a quarrel, pour on oil. Blessed are the peace-mak- 
ers. 

But the oil-can is for the rarer emergencies. It is 
not everybody that has the gift of putting oil on just 
the spot that grates; and it is not every day that quar- 
rels occur which call for the oil-can. But blessed be 
taffy! It is wanted every day and from everybody. 
It is the universal sweetness of social and domestic life. 

Husband, have you come home and found your wife 
tired and hot with the day's work in chamber and 
kitchen ? Give her a little taffy. Say a pleasant thing 
to her. Praise her for something. Tell her how nice 
the bread is, so much better than the baker's; that 
the catsup is the best she ever made; that the house 
looked so sweet and restful when you came in ; and 
at )'our leisure in the evening, tell her how much you 
prize her and the pleasant home she makes for you. 
It will do her good ; it will make the smiles come. 

Wife, does your good man come home weary and 
burdened, exhausted and — no, not cross, but unde- 
monstrative and silent? Meet him with a sweet wel- 
come. Say something pleasant to him. Men all love 
to be appreciated and flattered. Tell him some kind 



The writer once heard a man ask when and how 
the geological changes that carved out the fantastic 
figures on the top of a stone mountain had happened. 
The answer was that it was going on now as it always 




MIGHT BE ANYWHERE WEST, BUT THIS IS FROM 
AN OKLAHOMA ORCHARD. 

had been going and always would be. Weather and 
sun were getting in their work all the time and 
erosion was going on continually. 

It is precisely so in the slower process of map mak- 
ing. The boy who studies his geography, and who 
carries it with him as a man, will be misled many 
times in later life. The civil divisions of the earth 
seem to be as fixed as anything can be, yet the facts 
are that they are-continuall)' changing. In the last 
lifetime, and not a long one at that, Germany changed 
the map of France, England that of Africa and but 
yesterday the state of Panama was constituted. 

In the near future it is likely there will be marked 
changes in the map of the world, and if we could 
see the map of a thousand years to come we would 
be utterly astonished. 

♦ ♦ »> 

To betray a confidence is to make yourself despic- 
able ; many things are said among friends which are 
not said under a seal of secrecy, but are understood to 
be confidential, and a truly honorable man will never 
violate this tacit confidence. — D. Hartley. 



138 



the: ingleinook. 



HOW TO GET YOUR NAME CHANGED. 



If your name isn't just to your liking, and one sug- 
gests itself to your imagination as prettier or more dis- 
tinguished, the Circuit courts of any county are pre- 
pared to equip you with the new designation just as 
soon as you have complied with the court procedures 
and paid the costs of the case. 

For it comes to a bit of court procedure and the ex- 
penditure of $50, perhaps, before the new name is ac- 
credited and entered as permanent and binding by 
court decree. 

Generally speaking, they are persons of most com- 
mon or most uncommon names who seek the processes 
of the courts to effect the change. The first move that 
is made is the filing of a petition directed to the judges 
of the Circuit court, asking for the change, and speci- 
fying the name which the petitioner seeks. Previous 
to this petition a card announcing the application for 
the change must have been printed six times in a legal 
newspaper in the county, and each of these notices must 
have been printed before the opening day of the coiirt 
term. 

Ten dollars is the fee for filing the petition. Ac- 
cording to the circulation of the legal newspaper, the 
charge for printing the notices will be great or small, 
and when the application goes before the court for a 
hearing, the petitioner will have to be represented by 
counsel. So that, by the time a decree is rendered, al- 
lowing " Jacob Yeller," for instance, to take the name 
of " Earnest H. Burgess " the cost may easily have 
been $50. As to the time necessary, it may have been 
from six weeks to three years. 

Naturally more men than women apply to the courts 
to have their names changed, but simply a glance at the 
indices in the office of the Circuit clerk will indicate 
something of the proportion of women to men in these 
petitions. One woman to five men is about the pro- 
portion of changing names in Chicago ; sometimes 
there is a rush on the courts and again for weeks not a 
single application is filed. 

fn many cases there is a slight cause on the face 
of things to prompt the petition. Where a name is 
of foreign extraction and unwieldy and difficult to 
pronounce, it is recognized at once that to Anglicize it 
is a matter which really concerns the public welfare. 
On the other hand, there are applications for change 
of name wiiere only a family prejudice could have in- 
fluenced the request. 

In the following list George T. Berg was not so 
badly off as to have to appeal to the courts. Lilian 
Lacy, Katherine G. Post, and Grace Salisbury might . 
have stuck to the old names without fear of becom- 
ing hopelessly lost in the cosmopolitanism of Chicago. 
On the other hand, it is not strange that certain mem- 
bers in the list grew tired of their family names. The 



names below will show at least the style of name which 
the petitioners seek to shun : 



Katherine G. Post 
.A.nders M. Anderson 
George T. Berg 
Axel Proschowsky 
Maurice C. Zschuppe 
Peter Wohler 
Julius Guthmann 
Edward S. Kibitske 
John Levy 
Eugene Louderslager 
David Torofsky 



Louise M. Anderson 

Lilian Lacy 

Grace Salisbury 

Fred W. Jones 

John P. Kochensberger 

H. Camman 

George Green 

Jacob Yeller 

Lutzer de Gries 

Michael Yearney 

Harry Roe 

John Sandquist 

Frequently a man who wishes his name changed is 
satisfied with having the end cut off or with having 
the name cut in two. Recently a Robert Reubenstein 
had his name altered by making the new title Robert 
Reuben Stein. Lars Christiansen sought to have his 
name changed to Louis Oiristian Dalhousie, while 
Samuel Grodinsky would like to be called Samuel 
Grodson. 

Coming into court for a finding on the petition, tlie 
whole matter has the same status as a civil suit. If 
some one may object for cause and prove to the court 
that the petitioner has no right to ask the privilege, 
the court may refuse it. 

■' I have never heard of a contested case of the 
kind, however," said John H. Best, chief law writer 
of the Cook county Circuit court. " Ordinarily the 
only objections that might be filed to such a petition 
would come from mercantile agencies or abstract firms, 
and I have never heard of such interference. For the 
most part the names presented here for change are 
hard to spell and still harder to pronounce, and most 
English speaking people will be glad to see the changes 
made. 

" One of the worst cases that I recall in many years 
is that of a man named John Smith, who had sweated 
under the name years and years here in Chicago. Fi- 
nally some John Smith had a heavy judgment found 
against him, and this other John Smith found himself 
under the burden of proving or attempting to prove 
that it was another John Smith altogether. He was 
not successful, and he finally came into court with a 
petition for a name that was a jawbreaker. His point 
of view was that he had suffered long enough from 
a common name — that while he was at it he wanted 
something which couldn't be confused. And he got it, 
I giiess." 

In the Circuit court of Cook county there is a form 
whereby the person who is granted a change of name 
comes into possession of it in the most formal of or- 
ders. According to Mr. Best's " Encyclopedia of 
Common Law Orders," it reads: 

" Therefore, it is considered by the court that the 
name of the petitioner, John Smith, be and the same is 






the: ingi-einook. 



139 



hereby changed to John Lawrence, and that he shall 
henceforth from this date be legally and lawfully 
known and designated by the name of John Lawrence. 
According to the prayer of his said petition." 
* 4> * 
LAVENDER. 



London society folks' devotion to lavender water as 
a perfume is increasing rather than falling off, and 
in consequence the cultivation of the fragrant plant 
from which it is distilled is becoming more and more 
general throughout the country. This delicate scent 
was in high favor with the women of the English and 
French courts hundreds of years ago, but, oddly 
enough, its present popularity with the fashionable 
world dates from the time, not a great while back, 
when Queen Victoria, having become acquainted with 
lavender water under rather picturesque circumstances, 
fell in love with it. 

A century ago the perfume was distilled from lav- 
ender blossoms, chiefly by the titled ladies them- 
selves, who grew it in their gardens and distilled the 
oil in small quantities during the autumn months. 
Prepared in tliis way it was, naturally, very rare and 
expensive, and as chemically manufactured scents came 
to be placed upon the market the use of lavender wa- 
ter almost died out except among the old-fashioned 
country people. 

About twelve years ago, however, Miss Sproules, 

living in the picturesque Surrey village of Carshalton, 

1 about twelve rniles from London, conceived the idea of 

sending as a present to Queen Victoria a bottle of 

i home-distilled lavender water. The queen accepted 

the gift and was so delighted with its perfume that she 

commanded Miss Sproules to supply her constantly 

^with the scent. Of course this caused a great demand 

for lavender water to arise amongst society ladies and 

Hhe perfume became very fashionable. 

Orders poured in upon Miss Sproules, and her modest 
garden soon became inadequate to meet the demand for 
the purple lavender blossoms, so she took a ten-acre 
field, planted it with lavender and went into business 
on a large scale. So great has this industry grown that 
jin the neighborhood of Mitcham and Carshalton over 
600 acres are devoted to lavender growing, one field 
lalone containing sixty acres of fragrance. 
♦ ♦ 4* 
ADVICE SOUGHT. 



An Elgin boy with a taste for mathematics asks the 
Nook to tell him something of what he should do to 
utilize his talents to best advantage. Probably some 
thousands of boys have asked themselves the same 
question, and it is one in which so many are interested 
that we will have a talk about it. 

The Nook despairs of making ninety-nine one-hun- 



dredths of them see the necessity of preliminary edu- 
cation. The boy on being an engineer, civil or me- 
chanical, can, with difficulty, be made to see the ad- 
vantages accruing from completing a college course. 
" Of what good," says the boy, " is it to study some- 
thing that will never be of any use to me?" He 
doesn't see it, of course he doesn't. How could he 
understand that of which be knows nothing? But he 
is a wise boy who regards the wisdom and experience 
of the world as worth something to him as others have 
found it when too late to help themselves. 

Now a large part of school work is disciplinarj'. It 
has been found in the centuries past that the study of a 
language, dead or living, especially Latin and Greek, 
develops one's powers as nothing else will. In greater 
or less degree they constitute a part of all collegiate 
courses. Of late years there are parallel courses em- 
bracing the sciences and there is no end of combina- 
tions. They all look to making the student a many- 
sided man. Without them, had in one way or an- 
other, everybody is necessarily more or less lop-sided. 
The college man is trained to see all sides of a ques- 
tion, the one-sided man sees but one side, and that the 
one next to him. So, without going into any dis- 
cussion about it, the Nook's advice is to go through a 
good college as a first step. 

Now suppose our boy has graduated from some good 
college and that he is ready to acquire a profession. 
Being of a mathematical turn of mind he will have but 
little love for his literary education, but it is, never- 
theless, a necessity to him. Suppose he selects civil 
engineering as a profession. The Nook's advice is for 
him to select one of the schools that make a specialty 
of engineering, for the technical schools run to spe- 
cialities just as much as common, everyday restaurants 
and bake shops fall into making certain dishes better 
than can be found elsewhere. Go to one of these 
schools and take a complete course just as the school 
has outlined it. The thing to avoid, if it is at all pos- 
sible, is to overcome the feeling that it is useless and 
that it may be cut short. If a boy of twenty will take 
a literary and technical course that lets him out at 
twenty-eight, he will be farther on at forty than he will 
be at fifty, if there is any get-rich-quick method ap- 
plied. There are absolutely no short cuts to a real 
education. It only comes to him who buckles down to 
the course and bores away at it till he gets it. Once 
he has it his after chances are worth two of the 
" just picked it up " kind and the college boy will 
be building railroads while the hurry-up boy is sur- 
veying county roads. Of course one is as honorable 
as the other, but the fame and the bank accounts will be 
all with the A. B., A. M., C. E. man. 
»j> *> .;. 

No man ever did a designed injury to another but 
at the same time he did a greater to himself. — Home. 



140 



THE. INGL-EINOOK. 



OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXdOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 

o 



0u/r a&wz^i^^cvvv ^'^c^'Vue-t^. 



O0000000O00OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCX)OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC5OOOO 




HER ANSWER. 



" Do you know you have asked for the costliest thing 
Ever made by tl>e Hand above — 
A woman's heart and a woman's life 
And a woman's wonderful love? 

" Do you know you have asked for this priceless thing 
As a child might ask for a toy? 
Demanding what others might have died to win 
With the reckless dash of a boy. 

" I require all things that are grand and true, 
All things that a man should be; 
If you give this all I would stake my life 
To be all you demand of me. 

" I am fair and young, but the rose will fade 
From my soft young cheek one day; 
Will you love me then, 'mid the falling leaves. 
As you did 'mid the bloom of May? 

" Is your heart an ocean so strong and deep 
I may launch my all on its tide? 
A loving woman finds heaven or hell 
On the day she is made a bride." 
♦ 4* * 
AN INCIDENT OF THE WAR. 



The Pittsburg Gasette, in speaking of the power of 
song, gives an incident which took place during the war 
of the rebelHon and which was recently recited on 
an ocean liner, two Americans who served in oppo- 
site armies coming together. The Gazette gives the 
incident as follows : 

The power of a song is something wonderful at 
times. This is illustrated by a story, and a true one. 
told not long ago. 

Two Americans who were crossing the Atlantic met 
in the cabin one Sunday night to sing hymns. As they 
sang the last hymn, " Jesus, Lover of My Soul," one 
of them heard an exceedingly rich and beautiful voice 
behind him. He looked around, and, although he did 
not know the face, thought he knew the voice. So 
when the music ceased he turned and asked the stran- 
ger if he had been in the civil war. The man replied 
that he had been a Confederate soldier. 

" Were you at such a place on such a night? " asked 
the first. 

" Yes," he replied, " and a curious thing happened 
that night which this hymn has recalled to my mind. 
I was posted on sentry duty near the edge of a wood. 
It was a dark night and very cold, and I was fright- 
ened, because the enemy was supposed to be near. 
About midnight, when everything was very still, and 



I was feeling homesick and miserable, I thought I 
would comfort myself by praying and singing a hymn. 
I remember singing this verse : 

" ' All my trust on thee is stayed, 
All my help from thee I bring; 
Cover my defenseless head 

With the shadow of thy wing.' 

" After singing that, a strange peace came upon 
me, through the long night I felt no more fear." 

" Now," said the other, " listen to my story. I was 
a Union officer and was in the woods that night with 
a party of scouts. I saw you standing, although I did 
not see your face. My men had their rifles focused 
upon you, waiting the word to fire, btit when you 
sang out: 

" ' Cover my defenseless head 

With the shadow of thy wing,' 

I said : ' Boys, lower you rifles : we will go home.' " 

* ♦ * 

ROASTING AN OX. 



If any of our Inglenook women were called upon 
to supervise the roasting of a whole ox, they would 
probably be at their wit's end and not know how to 
proceed. It is really such a rare performance that 
when it is carried out on the occasion of some great 
social or political event some man of experience is sent 
for to supervise the proceeding. Here is one way 
by which it may be done. 

In the first place, an ox of the right size, or a steer, 
which is the same thing when it comes to cooking 
one, is skinned and prepared as a butcher would do 
without its being cut in two as ordinarily practiced. 
The legs are cut off at the knees and a long pole is run 
through the beef lengthwise, and kept in place by iron 
bands, and then a fire is made in which a large amount 
of wood is consumed and a bed of glowing coals is 
had, backed by a wall of bricks which reflects the heat. 
At the end of the pole passing through the beef a 
wagon wheel is attached and the whole is placed over 
the fire in such a way that a man standing at the wheel 
can turn the carcass of the animal slowly so as to 
prevent its burning. A sheet of zinc is placed under 
the animal which catches the juice that runs off and 
takes it into a bucket, and there are literally buckets 
full of it in the course of the work. 

When it comes to serving the ox it may be inter- 
esting to know that it is not all thoroughly cooked 
through and through, as that would be impossible, bur 






the: ingi_e:nook. 



141 



the outside is cooked and when this is sufficiently done 
it is pared off and served. It is evident that some 
portions of the ox will be cooked before others, and 
these are carved away carefully, while the thicker 
and heavier portions must be roasted longer. By be- 
ginning the roasting process at six o'clock in the morn- 
ing, at ten o'clock the first layer is ready for carving, 
;and the balance of it can be continued until seven 
o'clock in the evening before it is all done. It requires 
considerable skill to make the matter a success. 

.J. 4, ^ 

OLD BRIDAL CUSTOMS. 



There used to be a custom of strewing flowers be- 
ffore the bridal couples as they went to the church and 
from the church to the house. The Persians introduce 
a tree at their marriage feast laden with fruit, and it is 
^the place of the guests to try to pluck this without 
^the bridegroom observing. If successful they must 
-present the bridal couple with a gift of a hundred 
'times the value of the object removed. In Tuscany 
brides wear jasmine wreaths, and there is a legend 
that a once reigning Grand Duke, who at great ex- 
ipense procured this flower for his own particular gar- 
den, gave orders to his gardener not to part with any 
flowers or clippings ; but the gardener, who was in 
love, took a sprig to his sweetheart as a gift. She, 
being shrewd, planted it and raised from it several 
jsmall plants, which she sold to the Duke's envious 
neighbors at a very great price. In a short time she 
ihad saved sufficient money to enable her lover and her- 
(self to marry and start housekeeping, and so the Tus- 
cans have a saying that " the girl worthy of wearing 
the jasmine wreath is rich enough to make her hus- 
iband happy." 

♦ ♦ 4> 
i . ORIGIN OF THE WEDDING RING CUSTOM. 



Centuries ago women used to wear their wedding 
|rings on their thumbs, then the custom changed, and 
ithey wore them on their first fingers, and then again 
nthe custom changed and the method of to-day came 
jinto vogue. The custom of wearing the ring on the 
jthird finger originated through the ritual of the mar- 
ijriage service. The priest first put the ring on the 
ithumb, saying : " In the name of the Father ; " on 
the forefinger, adding, " in the name of the Son ; " on 
the second finger, repeating, " in the name of the Holy 
Ghost," and on the third finger, ending with " Amen," 
and there it stayed. 

♦ * ♦ 
WHY KITTY IS "PUSS." 



A GREAT many years ago the people of Egypt, who 
had many idols, worshiped the cat among others. They 
thought she was like the moon, because she was more 



active at night and because her eyes changed like the 
moon. So they made an idol with a cat's head and 
named it Pasht. The same name they gave to the 
moon, for the word means, " the face of the moon." 
The word has been changed to " Pas " and " Pus," 
and has come at last to be " Puss," the name the most 
of us give to the cat. 

4> ♦ 4* 
HINTLETS. 



Save Your Orange Peel. — A little dry orange peel 
will revive a fire which is nearly out, as will also a 
small quantity of sugar. 

To Extract Lemon Juice. — To extract the juice 
from lemons easily, place them in a moderate oven for 
five minutes before squeezing. 

Stains on Table Linen. — To remove tea or coffee 
stains from table linen, stretch the stained part over a 
basin and pour boiling water through. 

When Meat is Tainted. — If meat is slightly taint- 
ed, wash it in water to which a little unslaked lime has 
been added; rinse in cold water afterwards. 

To Make Boots Polish. — Rub with the inside half 
of a lemon, allow to dry, and black in the usual way, 
when a brilHant polish will be at once obtained. 

Useful in Wet We.\ther. — If your umbrella has a 
hole in it, gum a bit of black sarcenet ribbon evenly 
over the hole ; cut off any ragged edges when dry. 

A Way to Soften Blacking. — When blacking has 
become hard in the cake through long keeping, if a 
little water is poured over it and placed in a warm 
oven for ten minutes it will mix quite easily. 

Cheap Icing for Cakes. — Beat the whites of two 
eggs to a froth, sift in half a pound of icing sugar, 
spread over the cakes smoothly with a flat knife, fre- 
quently dipping the knife in cold water to prevent 
sticking, and then put it in a cool place to harden. 

When You Smash Your Watch Glass. — -Shake 
out the broken glass, open the little rim that holds it, 
the bezel, lay over the face a piece of tissue paper, and 
shut the bezel. This will save the hands catching in 
things, and not interfere with the going of the watch 
until you can get the glass put in. 

♦ ^ * 
The broom will last twice as long if dipped in boil- 
ing water when new and left to stand in it until the 
water is cold. Hang by slipping the brush part be- 
tween two nails driven close enough together to crowd 

the broom straws. 

+ * + 

Milk can be brought into the form of flour, from 
which it may again be made to assume the milk state 
bv the addition of water. 



142 



the: ingleinook 




■}.4. . ; ■ , 1 . .J, ■;. ■;. -t. .!■ .!■ » »» <. - t <• ■!■ ■ ^ ■}■ ■!■ • > <■ * •»■ - t - ■!■ » • ! • » » * * • ! • - t - t '!■ '!■ '!■ * '!' I' 't' !■ ■ ! ■ » ■ ! ■ L . 1 , . j . | 
. { . . ; ■ . 1 , . | i » a . . ! ■ i { . » » .|. .t ■> ■!■ 'I' t 'I' '»■ * '»■ ■ ! ■ 4-4'4"M'» * ■!■ •!■ • ! ■ ■ ! ■ '!■ ■!■ ■{■' ! ■ ■!' » • > ■ -I- •!■ ■»■ ■;■ • I '»»»»»| 




DUTCH LULLABY. 



Wyiiken, Blynken, and Nod one night 

Sailed off in a wooden shoe — 
Sailed on a river of crystal light. 

Into a sea of dew; 
"Where are you going, and what do you wish?'" 

The old moon asked the three. 
" We have come to fish for the herring fish 
That lives in this beautiful sea; 
Nets of silver and gold have we! " 
Said Wynkcn. 
Blynken, 
And Nod. 

The old moon laughed and sang a song. 

As they rocked in the wooden shoe. 
And the wind that sped them all night long 

Ruffled the waves of dew. 
The little stars were in the herring iish 

That lived in the beautiful sea — 
" Now cast your nets wherever you wish — 
Never afeard are we;" 

So cried the stars to the fishermen three; 
Wynken, 
Blynken, 
And Nod. 

All night long their nets they threw 

To the stars in the twinkling foam — 
Then down from the skies came the wooden shoe 

Bringing the fishermen home; 
'Twas all so pretty a sail it seemed 

As if it could not be, 
And some folks thought 'twas a dream they dreamed 
Of sailing that beautiful sea — 
But I shall name you the fishermen three: 
Wynken. 
Blynken, 
And Nod. 

Wynken and Blynken are two little eyes, 

And Nod is a little head. 
And the wooden shoe that sailed the skies 

Is a wee one's trundle bed. 
So shut your eyes while mother sings 

Of wonderful sights that be. 
And you shall see the beautiful things 
As you rock in the misty sea, 
Where the old shoe rocked the fishermen three: 
Wynken, 
Blyhken, 
And Nod. 



^ 4^ ^-* 

A MAGIC APPLE. 



-Eugene Field. 



"Such a rainy day!" said little Amy, dolefully. 
" I wish that I knew something new to do." 

'■ When I was a little girl," said her mamma, " I 



used to think it great fun to make a magic apple and 
surprise my papa. How would you like to make one 
for your papa ? " 

Amy was delighted with the idea, and brought a 
large fair apple. Her mamma gave' her a long 
needle and a strong thread, and showed her a long 
stitch in the apple close under the skin. Amy drew 
the thread, leaving about two inches hanging out of 
the apple; then she put the needle into the very hole 
that it came out of, and took another long stitch, and so 
on all around the apple, at the end bringing the needle 
and thread out of the first hole ; then she took hold of 
both ends of the thread and pulled hard, but carefully, 
and all the thread came out of the first hole. Amy 
rubbed the apple, which was a fine one, until it shone 
like glass. The needle-holes did not show. 

When papa came home, .'Vmy gave him the apple, 
and he sat down by the fire to eat it. He began 
to peel it with liis sharp knife. Oh, how surprised he 
looked when the apple suddenly fell in two when 
he had it a little more than half peeled ! 

Amy was pleased and surprised, too, for she had not 
realized that she had cut the apple in two under the 
skin when she pulled the thread out ; but she had. 

Any child, with a little care, can make a magic apple 
just as Amy did, and surprise somebody very much. 

♦ ♦ * 

MARGARET'S ALPHABET. 



Little Margaret was having difficulty with the al- 
phabet, which was being taught her in the good old 
way. The letter " h " was a desperate pitfall. " H " 
she could not remember, so her mother said, " See, 
Margaret, it looks like a gate." That was an inspir- 
ation. Now Margaret is in clover. She never for- 
gets, but this is what she says : 

" A, b, c, d, e, f, g, gate, i," etc. Her mother sees 
still harder work ahead in making the little maid for- 
get. 

4> •{• 4> 

BROTHER AND SISTER. 



A chubby little sister 
Was rubbing at a tub; 

A chubby little brother 
Came to help her rub. 

The chubby little brother 

Fell in with a cry; 
The chubby little sister 

Then hung him up to dry. 



INGL-EINOOK. 



t43 



«^3 Tfie Q* & (3^* Bspartmsttt* JW^ 



Why is the orbit of the moon irregular? 

The moon has an- irregular orbit for very much the 
same reason that the earth has, and it gets out of swing 
just the same as the earth does and for the same 
reason. Van-ing conditions cause it to maintain, an 
irregular adaptation to them. It is reasonable that if 
the earth does not describe a complete circle around 
the sun, because of disturbing influences tending that 
way, neither will the moon describe a complete circle 
around the earth. Getting down to the bottom of facts 
as to why the earth and sun and moon and all other 
planets hang together as they do, is a thing that we 
do not understand, only in a general way. 

Can the United States uphold the Monroe doctrine to- 
(day? 

If by this question it is meant to inquire whether it 
has the moral right to uphold it, the Inglenook does 
jnot say, it leading into a debatable political question. 
ilf it is meant whether the United States has power 
ii enough to keep foreign nations off the continent of 
jAmerica, it is likely that, if there was no combination 
on the part of the European powers, this government 
ijcould maintain its present position in regard to the 
[Monroe doctrine, namely, that no foreign power shall 
{obtain a foothold on the American continents. 

* 

I Does a vine-like plant actually reach out to get hold 
of a place or thing to take hold of? 

No, not in the reasoning sense of reaching out for 
a thing. The tendrils are in constant motion, continu- 
laJly reaching and circling on all sides till something is 
jreached, if only a part of the plant itself, when it at 
Jonce takes hold. Watch a tendril of a growing pea 
jplant and you will be able to see the motion. 

How would the Inglenook define " expansion " accord- 
ing to the United States methods? 

As the word is understood it means that the gov- 
jernment is extending its authority over territory that 
did not belong to it previously, the Philippine islands 
for illustration, more recently Panama. 



What is a 1779 dollar worth? 

Referring the query to a local authority, he says 
$2.25. 

Will chloroform affect lower animals? 
Yes, every one of them, especially those with lungs. 



How is war formally declared? 

Differently in different countries. Once a war is 
agreed upon, the parties pitch in with whoever or what- 
ever is nearest. The formal declaration may be de- 
layed a considerable time. If two nations were at the 
outs, their armies in the field, and one began, the armies 
or fleets on both sides would at once take it up. The 
formal declaration of war would come later. Tliere 
was no declaration of war in the case of the rebellion. 
It was declared an insurrection. 

♦ 
What does a meteorite look like? 

It may look like a stone, or a huge splattered-out 
chunk of iron. In either case there is a burned glaze 
all over the outside caused b}' its having been set on 
fire in its passage through the air. 

♦ 

Why are some hair or fur spots on animals white? 

It is thought to be due to a lack of nutrition, either 
by bone imderneath or a pad of fat. But this is only 
generally true. 

* 

Can one go to Jerusalem in the Holy Land by rail? 
Yes, from Joppa on the coast. There is a short 
railway managed by the French. 

What is the size of the charge of powder used in a 
cannon? 

Of course it will vary with the size of the gun. The 
largest the writer has read of is 640 pounds. 

* 

Is Jerusalem regarded as a sacred city by Moham- 
medans? 

Yes. Mohammedans believe in Christ and the Bi- 
ble, but rank Mohammed higher. 

Why are meteors white hot? 

They glow because they have been set on fire by the 
tremendous friction, passing through the air. 

How is condensed milk made? 

By boiling off the water in a vacuum. It can not 
be advantageously done at home. 

* 
What are the highbinders? 
A secret Chinese society devoted mainly to murder. 

Have snakes any eyelids? 
No. none. 



144 



the: iNGLEINOOK. 



LITERARY. 



TitH following publications have been received by 
the Tnglenook and will be noticed in detail later: 

Lif<pincotfs Magazine, ... 25 cents, any news stand. 

The Era, 10 cents, any news stand. 

The Arena. 25 cents, any news stand. 

Mind 25 cents, any news stand. 

Criterion 10 cents, any news stand. 

Scientific American, New York, and other magazines 
and books, will be noticed later. 
♦ * * 
FOOD FADS. 

This seems to be an age of food fads. The shelves 
of the groceries are full of new-fangled foods de- 
scribed in catchy style and often lumbered with high- 
sounding scientific terms. No store-keeper .thinks of 
keeping the run of all of them. They are continually 
coming out and passing away. 

Then there are the faddists who say that no break- 
fast, or no dinner or supper is the thing, and they 
prove it by the testimony of people who have tried 
it. There are also endless special articles of food for 
sale, and other apple, raw grain or what-not diets rec- 
ommended. Now what is the truth about the whole 
of them ? 

Doubtless all are good in a way. But for the whole 
world to adopt any of them is simply folly. It is a 
fact that those who are most given to these special 
articles of food are people who were not strong before 
they began their use, and for them they are a proper 
diet. But take a lumber camp in the pine woods where 
a hundred men get up before daylight, eat breakfast, 
and go out and cut down trees all day long in the 
snow. These people in the very prime of life could not 
and would not keep to their work on any cereal or 
special food preparation. Tliey want, and get, such 
things as hot, strong coffee, molasses, pork and beans, 
square yards of soft gingerbread and every form of 
solid, concentrated food. They get these things be- 
cause they like them and their systems call for such. 
There is no doubt of their health and strength. 

Now what is the conclusion? It is to eat what you 
crave, and all you want of it, as long as it does you 
no harm. To interrupt this normal condition is to 
invite trouble. On the other hand if any common 
food disagrees with you, don't take it. Eat what 
" stays by you." There is perhaps not one person in 
a thousand who has not some dietetic aversion, some 
one thing he cannot eat without trouble, — then don't 
eat it. That's all. Don't. In other words, instead 
of believing in every fad the papers thrust on you, have 
more faith in your personal experience, no matter what 
it is, and eat what " agrees " with you. If pork and 
beans and you get on well together, take them. If you 



are better off personally with any of the prepared 
foods, then eat of them. 

Thank heaven the question with the majority of 
people is not what they '' ought "' to eat, but how to get 
what they want. The healthy person is the one who 
never again hears from what he has filled up with, no 
matter what it is. 

^ ^ ^ 

INFANT MARRIAGES. 



Child marriages are still all too common in India. 
According to a recent report 143 boys and 
187 girls under one year of age were mar- 
ried in India during a single year. The rec- 
ord during the same year for marriages of children 
under five years was 2,297 for boys and 3,534 for girls. 
As a consequence of this state of affairs there were at 
the time the census was taken twenty-two widowers 
and twenty-seven widows less than a year old, and 
some three hundred less than five years old. The evil 
results of this system have been so extreme and alarm- 
ing among certain of the Hindoo castes that a bill has 
lately been drafted in the Province of Baroda which 
limits the marriage age at eighteen years for boys and 
fourteen for girls. 

* ♦ ♦ 

The Nook is in receipt of a letter in regard to mac- 
aroni wheat from an eastern miller, highly skilled in 
his profession. Will some one who has grown maca- 
roni wheat write us the results of the effort and what 
the wheat is like, when it is put in, when harvested, : 
and about the crop, and its appearance. As it is ' 
something- new in this country, everybody who grows ' 
wheat will be interested and we will appreciate all the 
replies we can get, and they will be summarized in the 
Inglenook. It is well to know something definite 
about fit, as it is a rather hazy subject in the minds of [ 
"lany. * * * 

L. D. Murray, 132 North Central Ave., Lima, Ohio, 
can tell the parties seeking for white clay where it can 
be found. * * * 

John Sloan, of Kingman, Kans., has some white 
clay on his farm. Parties interested may take it up 
personally. * * * 

Mrs. George Beitman, of York Springs, Pa., can 
tell the party who inquired for white clay where it 
can be found by writing her. 

* * ♦ 

" We think the Nook is the best dollar magazine we 
have even seen. We would not do without it." — 
Minnie Hopwood, Iowa. 

* ♦ ♦ 

'■ I AM, fraternally, a very strong Nooker." — Kate 
IV hi taker, Nebraska. 



the: ingleinook. 



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Made where 
used. No 
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For terms, etc., 



Great inducements to agents 

address with stamp, 

36t.^S W. A. DICKEY. North Manchester 



Ind. 




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"HOLMES' VEGETABLES A^n^J^ 

Is the title of our new Seed Book for 1904. This Book 
contains 80 pag-es, beautifully illustrated and full of 
useful information which every farmer should have. It 
is mailed Tree to every one who plants seeds for pleas- 
ure or profit. Send for it to-day. 

SPECIAL OFFER TO READERS OF 

INGLENOOK ONLY. 

We will mail one packet each of our famous late Cab- 
bage, Houser, Giant Crystal Head lettuce, and New 
Portune Teller Aster for 10 cents. Regular price, 30 
cents. We do not sell cheap bargain seeds. This of- 
fer is made to have you give our seeds a trial. Write 
to-day. Send to-day for our Seed Book. 

HOLMES SEED CO., :: Barrisbnrg, Pa. 


READ TBIS. 

Elgin. 111., Jan. 15, 
igo4. Dear Sirs:— 
Mrs. Royer just tells 
me she will get all her 
seeds of " Holmes '' 
this year, because 
what we got from 
them last year 
through Brother D. 
L. Miller were the 
best we ev«r had. 
—Galen B. Royer. 

Vinton, la., Feb. ig, 
1903. Gentlemen : — 
I desire to order 
more seeds from you. 
I liave been planting 
garden seeds forover 
sixtv years. and your 
seed-i rtre the best 
F ever planted.— 
H. T. Smock. 











6ti3 



Mention the LNGLENOOK when ^vriting 



INDIA==A PROBLEM 



By W. B. STOVER 



Is one of the best selling books ever put out by the House. It 
contains a large number of illustrations, and describes the work that 
our Missionaries are doing, and the difficulties they have to contend 
with. 

Any one, after reading this book, will have a splendid idea of 

India and Her Customs. 

Also will want to do more to lift her people out of sin and degra- 
dation. 

Agents are reporting large sales of books, and if you want to 
make some money quick 

The book, in cloth binding, sells for 81.25; morocco, 82.OO. 

Brethren Publishing: House, 

Elgin, Illinois. 




Rev. "W. Stepputat. 



Rev. W. Steppu- 
tat, whose likeness 
appears on this page 
of the Inglenook, is 
one of the many min- 
isters of the Gospel 
who have accepted 
agencies for DR. PE- 
TER'S BLOOD VI- 
TALIZER. He is lo- 
cated at Gumbinnen, 
Germany, where he 
has held an agency 
for the remedy for 
fourteen years. He 
is recognized by his countrymen as a man of much 
ability and learning. He is possessed of those quali- 
ties of heart and mind which crown a minister's labors 
with success. He was prompt in recognizing the 
merits of DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER and 
it is largely through his efforts that the remedy has 
come into such general use throughout the German 
Empire. The great demand for it in his own neigh- 
borhood is best evidenced by the large orders for 
medicine which he sends in. Like most agents for the 
remedy, he did not accept an agency until he had sat- 
isfied himself as to its curative properties, which can 
be seen by the following letter : 

Gumbinnen, Germany. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I deem it my duty to extend to you my 
thanks for the bo.x of Blood Vitalizer ordered of you. 
The medicine had a remarkable effect. My wife, who 
has been suffering with pains in the stomach, palpitation 
of the heart and general weakness, has, by God's mercy, 
completely regained her health after having used six bot- 
tles. It shall always be a pleasure for me to recommend 
your Vitalizer, and I shall certainly never be without it. 

Yours truly, 
Rev. W. Stepputat. 

A LETTER FROM SWITZERLAND. 

Wald, Canton Zurich, Switzerland, Feb. gth. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Very Esteemed Sir: — My eldest son, Paul, eighteen 
years of age, had been suffering with Flechten (herpetic 
eruptions), extending all over his body, ever since his 
early childhood, and he was consequently, at times, espe- 
cially during the winter, a very miserable and pitiable 
being. 

We had been doctoring for him a great deal, regardless 
of expense; even professors, who were specialists in the 
treatment of skin diseases, were consulted, but to no avail. 

In the latter part of the year 1892 I was personally in- 
formed by Mr. Jacob Knecht, a farmer in Bodenacker, 
Gyrenbad, that he had a remedy which might cure my 
poor Paul. 



Mr. Knecht, whom I knew to be a Christian and trust- 
worthy, was able to win my confidence at once, and I 
commenced a trial. 

Bottle after bottle of the Dr. Peter's Vitalizer and Dr. 
Peter's Oleum was used. Months after months passed; 
no change in the condition of our dear Paul. Such a ter- 
rible breaking out ai the disease took place, especially at 
the joints, that it was almost impossible for Paul to move 
himself. 

I ordered him to bed for an indefinite length of time, 
in order that his body might have a uniform warmth, 
which could but be favorable to the breaking out of the 
disease. Ai the same time I saw to it that nourishing 
food was taken and that the daily airing of the room 
and thorough cleaning of the bedclothes were not omit- 
ted. The breaking out of the disease was increasing. 
Paul was hardly recognizable. His hair fell out and I was 
reproached by near relatives for sending Paul to the 
grave, as they said that; by ignoring all professional help, 
an accounting and severe punishment awaited me. 

I, however, had confidence and persevered. The erup- 
tion began to form into scales which by and by fell oflf, 
so that I could throw away a dustpanful thereof daily. 
Underneath the scales a reddened skin appeared, which 
by and by began to look white, clean and fresh. 

His confinement to the bed lasted about six weeks, and 
thirteen bottles of the Vitalizer and seven of the Oleum 
were used, Paul is now cured, with the exception of a 
single spot about the size of a hand on his abdomen. 

Is not that a miracle? Solo Deo Gloria! 

Mr. Knecht has no medicine on hand at present, and 
besides that, at the beginning of last month all at once he 
returned to America, and his wife sent me word that they 
are expecting a nevv- supply from Dr. Peter Fahrney and 
that they had remitted for same some time ago. 

I am awaiting its arrival, and requesting other sufTer- 
ers to whom I have recommended your medicine to be pa- 
tient. Four bottles have been ordered from me. 

With the aid of God I try to make known your remedies 
on all occasions. I think they are in favor with God and 
mankind. Respectfully and humbly, 

Theodore Schubert. 

The increase in the demand for the BLOOD VI- 
TALIZER in foreign countries has kept pace with the 
demand in the United States. Over thirty-two tons 
of the BLOOD VITALIZER were shipped to foreign 
ports during the year 1903. When it is reinembered 
that not one line of advertising has been placed in a 
foreign newspaper, the demand for the reinedy is 
simply remarkable. That the BLOOD VITALIZER 
has become known the world over can only be account- 
ed for by the fact that a knowledge of it has been im- 
parted b}' friend to friend and kin to kin based on per- 
sonal experience. It is- a peculiar but the most ef- 
fective form of publicity. 

There are people in our own land who have heard of 
but who have not yet tried this old, time-tried herb- 
remedy. Are you one of these? DR. PETER'S 
BLOOD VITALIZER is put up for a specific pur- 
pose — the cure and benefit of sick people. It is not 
an article of commercial traffic, but is supplied to the 
people direct through special agents appointed in every 
community. For further particulars address, 



OR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, III. 



the: ingi_e:nook.. 



CAP GOODS 

We have sold cap goods by mail for nearly six 
years. Each year the volume oi our business has 
increased. This steady growth is the best evi- 
dence that the thousands of sisters who are buy- 
ing goods of us ate well pleased. A trial order 
will convince you that our line is unexcelled either 
in quality or price. Send for free samples and a 
booklet of testimonials. 

R. E. ARNOLD, Elgin, Illinois. 

<)tl eow MeorioD the INGLENOOK when writiog. 

^ » ^ » 1f « * «>^-»-^ ♦ * ■> 1- ^ > * « » * * t ^ * > * ■> » * * » ^ * *J»>** ►J» >*<-tj»**< » * > > * « * 1 * » * 4 *^*^* 

I CAP GOODS j 

I LARGEST ASSORTMENT, f 
I BEST VALUES — ^ % 

t 
* 



t * 



fSend postal card for free samples ^ 
and miyVT premium list. X 

* * 9 % 

I A. L. GARDNER, f 

T *♦* 

^ 229 12 St., N. £., Wasliing-ton, B. C. >;* 

/** ,♦, ■♦■ ■♦■ ■»■ ■», .♦■ .*. .*. .*. ■♦■ ■♦■ ■*, .♦_ ♦ ^ 

*f"f"l"'J' 'I* V V *V V V •!" V V V V V V V V V V V V "J* V v 

Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 4tl3eow 

Howell Connty, So. Missouri 

Is the country of to-day for the homeseeker. The 
best plaee in the U. S. for a poor man or a man 
of moderate means to get a start in life. It is a 
rolling, timbered country and no prairie. There 
are few spots in the U. S. that have better cli- 
mate—short winters, and summers not so hot as 
in the Northern States. The products are corn, 
wheat, oats, rye, timothy, clover and every- 
thing that can be .raised in this latitude. It is 
also one of the coming fruit countries of ihe 
U. S. West Plains, the county seat, is a good, 
live town of 3,500 people, located on the main 
line of the Frisco R. R. We have lands for sale 
ranging in price to suit everyone. Would you. 
kind reader, like to have a home in this favored 
country? No malaria, etc. No colored people. 
We have just located a few Brethren people 
here and want more We want every reader of 
this paper to write us for our pamphlet. T/te 
Homeseekers' Revie-w, land list and map of the 
country. Bank and other references furnished. 
Address at once: 

SIMMONS & EPPS, 

West Plains, Mo. 



52-1 ! 



MeBlioD the INGLENOOK when writing 



MAKE TOUR ZDI^i: MOXTITY EABIT 
10 to 20 per cent per anniuu 

by investing now in a good, honest, 
highly successful commercial enter- 
prise, well established, earning large 
profits and paying dividends of 10 to 
20 per cent per annum, reg'ularly and 
safely. "W^e believe no other invest- 
ment obtainable to-day equals this 
one for large and steadily increasing 
profits, economical management and 
absolute safety. Full particulars 
free upon application. Address; 
ETewcomer & Price, Mt. Slorrls, 111. 



4t4 



fUeniioD ihe LNUL UNuuh 



MDAYS TRIAL 
5 Years Guarantee 

OLD TRUSTY 

Incubators. 




Good, Honest Incubators made by Johnson, 
the incubator man. 3 walls, 2 dead air spaces, 
improved copper heating system. Will use 
about Vz as much oil as the old makes. Price 
SIO.OO for 120 egg size, other sizes in propor- 
tion. Quick shipments a specialty. Johnson will send 
you his newincubatorand poultry advice book, Itshows 
now to keep your egg records. Writeforittoday. It'sfree. 
M. M. JOHNSON, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA. 



A DROP OF BLOOD 



Taken from a person who has for 
a few months used Vernal Pahiiet- 
tona ( formerly known as Vernal 
Saw Palmetto Berry \\'ine ) is pure 
and free from taint. 

We say a few months, because it 
takes times to overcome the effect 
of years of careless living in the 
matter of diet, sleep and dissipation. 
This great one dose a day remedy 
gives quick relief from indigestion, 
constipation, dyspepsia, headache 
and all kinds of kidney, liver and 
stomach trouble, but as the impuri- 
ties entered the system slowly, so 
they must be gotten rid of. 

Poisons and disease germs creep 
into the blood through the reten- 
tion of impure waste matter in the 
stomach and bowels and through 
inactive kidneys and a lazy liver. 
\ ernal Palmettona gives gentle aid 
to the weakened digestive organs. 
Gradually they gain strength and 
are finally able to perform their nat- 
ural functions without any help. 
When this stage is reached, use a 
little judgment in what you eat and 
drink and you will have no more 
trouble. You'll be able to do twice 
as much work as before, whether 
it is done with your hands or brain. 

Perhaps you Have read this kind 
of talk before and have found the 
remedy talked about to be a flat 
failure in your case. If so, you 
are prejudiced. Knowing that such 
a prejudice often exists, we give 
every one a chance to try Vernal 
Palmettona before they buy. It is 
on sale at all leading drug stores, 
but you can try it free of expense. 
Write us for a free sample bottle 
to-day. It will be promptly sent 
postpaid. If it does you good, it is 
easy to step into a drug store and 
get a full size bottle. The druggist 
will not try to sell you something 
else. If he does he is an exception, 
for druggists know that Vernal Pal- 
mettona is the best remedy of its 
kind in existence. Vernal Remedy 
Co., 419 Seneca Building, Buffalo, 
N. Y. 



EUREKA GOODS! 

Are Absolutely Pure and Fresh. Sold 
upon Merit and G-uarantee. 

A FEW IiEADHRS. 

Our Father's Hog' Cholera Cure.. .Pound 

can, 50 cents. 

Our Mother's Poultry Powder and Chol- 
era Cure. Pound can, 50 cents. 

Our Mother's Healing Ointment. 25 
cents per jar. 

Our Mother's Tooth Powder. 25 cents 
I)er box. 

Our Mother's Electric Silverware Polish. 
25 cents per box. 
Any or all sent postpaid. Satisfac- 
tion guaranteed or money refunded 

without a single question. 

Special terms to local and canvassing 

agents. Write to-day. 

EITRIIKA SPECIALTY CO., 
Box 438 Decatur, HI. 

4tI3 Uenlion the IXRLENOOK when wntinit 



Very Low Rates to the Mardi Gras 
and Winter Resorts, 

Via the North-Western Line. On 
account of the Mardi Gras, excursion 
tickets will be sold to New Orleans, 
Mobile and Pensacola, Feb. 9 to 14, 
inclusive, also to New Orleans, on 
Feb. IS, for trains arriving at New 
Orleans by noon of Feb. 16, with fa- 
vorable return limits and stop-overs. 
Excursion tickets are also on sale dai- 
ly, at reduced rates, to the principal 
winter resorts in the United States 
and Mexico. For full information ap- 
ply to agents Chicago & North-West- 
ern R'y. 



THE OVERLAND LIMITED. 



The Traffic Departineift of the Chi- 
cage & North-Western R'y has issued 
a handsome booklet descriptive of the 
Overland Limited, the most luxurious 
train in the world, and of the Chicago, 
Union Pa,cific & North-Western Line, 
the route of this famous train to the 
Pacific Coast. Fully and interesting- 
ly illustrated. Copy mailed to any 
address on receipt of two-cent stamp, 
by W. B. Kniskern, P. T. M., Chi- 
cago. 



BOOKS! 



BOOKS! 



Do you want a list of good books? 
If so, drop us a post:4 card, asking 
for our new catalogue. t is sent 
free to any one for the asking. 

If you want to purchase a birth- 
day present or gift for any one, a 
book is always acceptable. 

Address, 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, 
Elgin, Illinois. 



the: ingleinook. 



<"t < " i "t"i"t"t"t - »**<"i - <"»"i ' <"t ' »*»<"i"t"i - »» ' t » » * »* -i "i"i"M"i ' » ' :"i" i "i"t ' * * * ' t ' <"t 



The Gospel Messenger 



-A i6-Page Weekly; 

Devoted entirely to the interests of the Brethren church 
and the cause of Christ. It contains spicy articles on 
live topics written by the ablest thinkers and writers in 
the church. If you are not familiar with it, drop us a 
card and we will take pleasure in mailing you a sample 



jpy. 



Special Combination Offer. 



Qospel Messenger, one year, - = . - $i 50 
The Book " Eternal Verities," by D. L. Miller, ^tuJ" ' 25 



BOTH rOOETHER, EITHER OLD 
OR NEW SUBSCRIBERS, . . . 



$1.75 



i 



BRETHREN PUBUSHJNQ HOUSE, 

ELQIN, ILLINOIS. 

i 
t 

M}M»4MtM{». ; . ■ } ■ . } ■ . J . ■ { ■ , t . . » it , j f . } ■ ,x, . J , . 1 , . t . . 1 . . t . , t . ■ ! ■ ■ ! . ■ ! . ■ ! ■ . 'i . 



The Busy Man's Friend... 



Here is a book for you. Tht Busy 
Man's Friend is i book that we give away. 
It is not very large. You can carry it in 
your coat pocket, but it is full, from cover 
to cover, of things that every man ought to 
know. It is made up of the odds and ends 
cf information in regard to everyday knowl- 
edge, such as matters of legal interest, 
measurement of buildings, and rules of ac* 
tion generally Just what you want to 
know and don't know where t© find it. 
It is all in the Busy Man's Friend, tlie 
hook that we give away. Thousands and 
thousands of them have been put out to 
the entire satisfaction of those who got 
them. Have you bad yours yet? If not 
here is the way you can get it: Send us the 
name of one new subscriber to the Inclk- 
NOOK Magazine, remitting $i.oo with your 
order, and we will send you the book free 
of charge for your trouble and also place 
the new name on the mailing list from now 
on until the end of the year 1904. 

You may be a busy man yourself. If so. 
you want a friend of like tastes. That is 
the book, for The Busy Man's Friend con- 
tains just what you want to know without 
wasting your time looking it up in other 
places. See that you get that book as soon 
as the mails can bring it to you. 



Brethren Publishing House, 

Elgin, Illinois. 




Free! Fr ie 1 1 

Our 1903-04 64-page 

Book and Bible... 

Catalogue 

♦ * * 

It contains many handsome cuts of 
books and Bibles and gives full descrip- 
tion and price of same In fact it is the 
largest and most complete catalogue 
ever put out by the House. Order it 
now. A postal card will bring it to you. 

Address 

Brethren Publishing House 

Els:in« Illinois. 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anvone sending a sket ch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Conimunica- 
tionsstrictlyconfldential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
Bent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken throuEh Munn & Co. receive 
special notice^ without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handHoinely illnstrated weekly. Tiargest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms. |3 a 
year; four months, fl. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN XCo-^e's™^-'- New York 

Braocb Office. 625 F St- WashiDBlon. D. C. 




Via Dubuque, Waterloo and Albert Lea. 
Fast Vestibule Night train with through 
Sleeping Car, Buffet-Library Car and Free 
Reclining Chair Car. Dining Car Service 
en route. Tickets of agents of I. C. R. R. 
and connecting lines. 

I A. H. HANSON. C. P. A.. CHICAGO. 



Several Handsome Premiums 



One of the things that nearly everybody wants, and certainly everybody finds occasion to use from 
Ime to time, is a fountain pen. Now the Inglenook has a number of Laughlin Fountain Pens, in both 
adies' and gentlemen's style. These pens are advertised and sold by the thousands, and readers of high- 

riced magazines have often seen them advertised. They come in boxes, accompanied by an arrange- 
ment to fill them with ink; have a gold pen, and they are as fine a Fountain Pen as you will likely find 

lywhere for the money. These pens sell for one dollar, and we will make you a present of one if you get 

\fO new subscribers for the Inglenook. 



^>J THE TRIO 



^P Almost any Nooker can get two of his neighbors to take the Inglenook for a year and get, for his 

'trouble, one of these beautiful and effective Fountain Pens. Remember, that for two new subscribers you 
will get the pen. 

Where is the boy, or man or woman for that matter, who does not need a knife? Now, it so hap- 

' pens, that we have in our possession a number of well-made pocket knives which we intend to give away 

; to our friends. Anybody who sends in one new subscriber will receive by return mail, for his trouble, this 

substantial pocket-knife. The Inglenook editor has carried one of these around with him all over tht 

United States, or that part of it which he has visited in the interest of the Nook family. It is a strong 





knife and one that will last for many a year. It is made by the Lawton Company, of Chicago, and on re- 
ceipt of one new subscriber, which any present Nooker will get, we will remember him with a pocket- 
i knife that will last him a good part of a lifetime, if he does not lose it. We do not guarantee against loss 
but we will guarantee this knife to be a good one. This knife would sell for 50 cents in a regular store. 

Now every woman likes to have a knife just 
as well as a boy or man and she can put it 
to more usage than any man or boy would 
ever think of doing. To provide for her we have a beautiful little pearl-handled knife with two blades, 
just such a knife as a lady would like to have and will cost at least 75 cents if bought at a hardware store. 

Now whoever sends in two new subscribers for the Inglenook is going to get'one of these knives. 
It is a stout, well-built knife, big enough for any purpose for which a penknife may be used, and our guar- 
antee with this is, that after you get it if you lose it you will be sorry. 

Now, furthermore, suppose you start out to get new subscribers for the Inglenook, and nobody 
knows how to talk it up better than those who have read it, and you are one of them. Suppose you get 
one new subscriber, that means a knife for yourself if you happen to be of a masculine persuasion. 

Supposing that you find it easy to get another subscriber, you have a chance to get the Fountain 
Pen; and if you get two more, making four in all, you can have the Ladies' Knife and the Fountain Pen, 
both of them handy things to have about. Do the best you can, and that is the best done by beginning' 
right away. The knives and pens are ready for you and will be sent from this office on receipt of the 
subscriptions. 



nEIlsixi., Illlin.<3is. 



Albaugh Bros., Dover & Co., 



333-335 Dearborn St. 



^Flie 3S^A.il Ox'ca.ex' :^Eo'uaie. 



That's the Place." 



CHICAQO, ILL. 



To Ouf Friends 



The constant increase in the volume of orders that we are receiving daily from the readers of the Inglenook 
proves to us that we have made a friend of everyone that has patronized us during the past year. We 
appreciate this confidence in us very much and sliall always endeavor to handle our business in a manner 
that will prove us worthy of the same. We guarantee every article to be exactly as represented and will replace any that are not satisfactory, or will refund 
the money sent us, together with transportation charges. Your orders will be given very careful attention and will b« filled promptly. 




Alarm Clock that Does ilarm! 

The accompanying eut 
is a small illustration 
of our Parlor Alarm 
Clock. This beauti- 
ful clock is made 
with a cast iron case, 
gunmetAl finish, and 
has scroll ornamen- 
tation, as shown in the 
illustration. The 
alarm bellisskilUutly 
concealed in the base 
of the clock and has an 
extremely long and 
'' loud ring, making it a 
su re awakener. 
The movement is the very best and is guaran- 
teed for two years. Will run thirty hours 
without winding. If you forget to wind it at 
night it will be running the next morning. It is 
dust proof and practically indestructible. 
It is fully worth five ordinary alarms, being the 
most durable and substantial everofifered. 
5^ inches high, weighs 3J4 pounds, and tf|| AA 
will be shipped by express upon receipt of <q)I.Vv 



Complete 

Set of 

Table 

Silverware, 

$2.55 



27 PIECES— 6 knives, 6 forks. 6 
tablespoons, 6 teaspoons, 1 butter knife, 1 
sugar shell, 1 picklefork, of the ROGERS' 
STERLING BRAND, finest coin silver 
plate, in a fine, satin-lined, brocaded 
velvet case, exactly as shown in the small 
IHustration. This ofTer is genuine, and we 
guarantee satisfaction absolutely, and will re- 
turn your money if you do not find the goods 
exactly as represented. Over 20« of these 
sets now in use in 'Nookers' homes, and all 
giving satisfaction. The set weighs about 7 
pounds and will be shipped by express on re- 
cei pt nf $2.55 from readers of the Inglenook. 

Alnminam Salt & Pepper Shaker. 

Two pieces, each 2]4 inches 
high, iJ4 inches in diameter, ex- 
actly as shown in the illustration. 
made of solid aluminum, 
satin tinish and polished, sim- 
ilar in appearance to sterling sil- 
ver. Fitted with bevel tops. 
which are always secure, yet 
easily removed for filling. Use- 
ful and ornamental. Our spe- 
cial offer to Nook readers. One 
set sent [postpaid with our ^A^i 



catalogue for. 



This Wagon Jack is made 
entirely of Iron, is easy to 
operate and is self-locking 
and self-adjusting. The 
hundreds of satisfied cus- 
tomers that are now using it 
proves it to be the most per- 
fect Wagon Jack made. It 
weighs 8 pounds and will lift 
8,000 pounds. ...65 centa 







Table Cutlery 

In order to meet the many inquiries we have 
received from the readers of the Inglenook 
we submit the following offers of Table Cut* 
lery. This cutlery is the very best to be had 
and cannot be duplicated for the same money 
elsewhere. The forks and blades are of the 
best steel, finished in the best of workmanship, 
and are not case hardened iron as is usually 
offered. If ordered by mail send 35 cents ex- 
tra per set. 



A-38. — Single bolster, straight steel 
blade, cocobolo handle, set of 6 Knives 
and 6 Forks, for 83 cents 

A-39. — Same as above, with black 
ebony handles 99 cents 

A-40. — Single bolster, scimeter steel 
blade, just as illustrated, cocobolo han- 
dle, set of 6 Knives and 6 Forks, for 

96 cents 

A-41. — Same as .A-40 but black ebony 
handle $1.10 



A-42. — Double bolster, straight steel 
blade, cocobolo handle. Set 6 Knives 
and 6 Forks, for 98 cents 

A-43. — Double bolster, Scimeter steel 
blade, cocobolo handle — just as Illus- 
trated. Set 6 Knives and 6 Forks, for 
$1.00 



A-44. — Single bolster, straight steel 
blade, oval swell cocobolo handle. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks, for $1.00 

A-45. — Same as above, but Scimeter 
blade $1.14 



A-46. — Double lap bolster, Scimeter 
blade, polished oval swell cocobolo han- 
dle. The very best to be had. Set 6 
Knives and 6 Forks, for $1.57 

Kitchen Knife Set 



;0i!^i3ISSSElS 



A-47. — Bread Knife 1 Cake Knife and 
1 Paring Knife, made of the best cold 
rolled nickeled steel and will give satis- 
faction. The handles are firmly swaged 
to the blades and will not come loose. 
Per set of three Knives 16 cents 



Special Handkerchief Sale 

A-4S. — Genuine 
linen 12 x 12-lnch 
ladies' handker- 
chief with 1 inch 
fancy drawn 
stitched border 
trimmed all 
around with one- 
half - inch French 
Valenciennes edg- 
ing. A very dainty article, as illus- 
trated. Each, postpaid 10 cents 

A-49. — Ladies scalloped edge silk em- 
broidered handkerchief. One corner 
with a handsome floral design embroid- 
ered in silk in assorted colors. Per doz- 
en, postpaid 60 cents 





Comfortable Rocker 




Large and roomy; made of good stock; 

highly polished; made in oak or elm; 

guaranteed the lowest , priced comfort 

chair sold. Has high back and broad 

top slat; a bargain. 

A-BO. — In oak $2.30 

A-Bl.— In elm $2.10 



Send all Orders to Albaugh, Bfos., Dover & Co., 323=325 Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 



^iNSLtKOOK, 



A WEEKLY MAGAZINE 




All Fields are Green and All Skies Blue to Them. 
Courtesy S. P. R'y. 



ELGIN, ILLINOIS 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE 



February 1 6, 1 904 



$1.00 per Year 



Number 7, Volume VI 



the: inqlenook. 



E3ciiJ.tty TSa:fs- cfc &-VLj£>j^Xy C3o., C31a.ioago, 111. 



DON'T BUY 
Your Vehicle 

Until you 
have looked 
over our Cata- 
logue, which 
will be Mailed 
Pree for the 
asking. 

Send for 

CATALOG 

Now. 

Best Grade 
Rubber Tires, 
Fully Warrant- 
ed, furnished on 
any "Equity" 
Vehicle for 
$10.00 for 
inch, $11.50 for 



IT COSTS YOU, NOTMI^G 

To send for our catalogue. It 
means a big saving to you when you 
buy jour vehicle. Our co-operative 
plan of doing business enables us to 
quote the lowest prices. 

SUBJECT TO AFFBOVA&. 

We ship with the privilege of ex- 
amination and guarantee perfect sat- 
isfaction. We furnish Buggies, Pha- 
etons, Stanhopes, Surreys, Driving 
Wagons, Runabouts, Spring Wagons, 
Farm Wagons, — in fact everything in 
the Vehicle and Harness line. 




EQUITY MFG. AND SUPPLY CO., 



\ A Co-operative Company ^ 
) Owned by Brethren. 







"HOLMES' VEGETABLES ^f^^:.. 

Is the title of our new Seed Book for 1904. This Book 
contains 80 pages, beautifully illustrated and full of 
useful information which every farmer should have. It 
is mailed Pree to every one who plants seeds for pleas- 
ure or profit. Send for it to-day. 

SPECIAL OFFER TO READERS OF 

INGLENOOK ONLY. 

We will mail one packet each of our famous late Cab- 
bage, Houser, Giant Crystal Head I^ettuce, and New 
Portune Teller Aster for 10 cents. Regular price, 30 
cents. We do not sell cheap bargain seeds. This of- 
fer is made to have you give our seeds a trial. Write 
to-day. Send to-day for our Seed Book. 

HOLMES SEED CO., :: Harrisburg, Pa. 


KEAD THIS. 

Elgin, 111., Jan. 15, 
IQ04. Dear Sirs: — 
Mrs. Royerjust tells 
me she will get all her 
seeds of " Holmes '■ 
this year, because 
what we got from 
them last year 
through Brother D. 
L. Miller wert- the 
best we ever had. 
—Galen B. Royer. 

Vinton. la., Feb. iq, 
1903. Gentlemen : — 
I desire to order 
more seeds from you. 
I have been planting 
garden seeds for over 
sixty years.and your 
seeds are the hest 
I ever planted.— 
H.T. Smock. 







6ti3 



Mention the INGLENOOK when writing. 



To Advertise... 



Judiciously is an art, and many make a failure 
because they lack knowledge. Advertisers will 
be helped by our advertising experts, 
ing the best possible results. 



in secur- 



BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, Elgin, 111. 



FRUIT TREES! 

Complete Assortment Small Fruits, Roses 
Shrubbery, Evergreens, etc. Clean, strong, 
healthy stock, well rooted. Guaranteed to give 
satisfaction . Club raisers wanted in every neigh- 
borhood. Special inducements now. Write for 
terms and prices. 48113 

E. MOHLER, Plattsburg, Mo. 

Mention the irtULENOOK when wnting. 

HOMESEEKERS* EXCURSIONS TO 
THE NORTHWEST, WEST AND 
SOUTHWEST, AND COLONIST 
LOW RATES WEST. 

Via the North- Western Line. Excur- 
sion tickets at greatly reduced rates are 
on sale to the territory indicated above. 
Standard and tourist sleeping cars, free 
reclining chair cars and "the best of 
everything." For dates of sale and full 
particulars apply to agents Chicago and 
North- Western Railway. 

TO CALIFORNIA, 

Via the Chicago, Union Pacific & 
North-We.'^tern Line. Two solid fast 
trains through to California daily. 
The Overland Limited (electric light- 
ed throughout) less than three days 
en route, leaves Chicago 8 P. M. An- 
other fast train leaves Chicago, 11:3s 
P. M. Apply to Agents Chicago & 
North-Western R'y. 




Rev. W. Stepputat. 



Rev. W. Steppu- 
tat, whose likeness 
appears on this page 
of the Inglenook, is 
one of the many min- 
isters of the Gospel 
who have accepted 
agencies for DR. PE- 
TER'S BLOOD VI- 
TALIZER. He is lo- 
cated at Gumbinnen, 
Germany, where he 
has held an agency 
for the remedy for 
fourteen years. He 
is recognized by his countrymen as a man of much 
ability and learning. He is possessed of those quali- 
ties of heart and mind which crown a minister's labors 
with success. He was prompt in recognizing the 
merits of DR. PETER'S BLOOD VITALIZER and 
it is largely through his efforts that the remedy has 
come into such general use throughout the German 
Empire. The great demand for it in his own neigh- 
borhood is best evidenced by the large orders for 
medicine which he sends in. Like most agents for the 
remedy, he did not accept an agency until he had sat- 
isfied himself as to its curative properties, which can 
. be seen by the following letter : 

Gumbinnen, Germany. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney, Chicago, 111. 

Dear Sir: — I deem it my duty to e.xtend to you my 
thanks for the box of Blood Vitalizer ordered of you. 
The medicine had a remarkable effect. My wife, who 
has been suffering with pains in the stomach, palpitation 
of the heart and general weakness, has, by God's mercy, 
completely regained her health after having used six bot- 
tles. It shall always be a pleasure for me to recommend 
your Vitalizer, and I shall certainly never be without it. 

Yours truly. 
Rev. W. Stepputat. 

A LETTER FROM SWITZERLAND. 

Wald, Canton Zurich, Switzerland. Feb. pth. 
Dr. Peter Fahrney. Chicago, 111. 

Very Esteemed Sir: — My eldest son, Paul, eighteen 
years of age, had been suffering with Flechten (herpetic 
eruptions), extending all over his body, ever since his 
early childhood, and he was consequently, at times, espe- 
cially during the winter, a very miserable and pitiable 
being. 

We had been doctoring for him a great deal, regardless 
of expense; even professors, who were specialists in the 
treatment of skin diseases, were consulted, but to no avail. 

In the latter part of the year 1892 I was personally in- 
formed by Mr. Jacob Knecht, a farmer in Bodenacker, 
Gyrenbad. that he had a remedy which might cure my 
poor Paul. 



Mr. Knecht, whom I knew to be a Christian and trust- 
worthy, was able to win my confidence at once, and I 
commenced a trial. 

Bottle after bottle of the Dr. Peter's Vitalizer and Dr. 
Peter's Oleum was used. Montlis after months passed; 
no change in the condition of our dear Paul. Such a ter- 
rible breaking out of the disease took place, especially at 
the joints, that it was almost impossible for Paul to move 
himself. 

I ordered him to bed for an indefinite length of time, 
in order that his body might have a uniform warmth, 
which could but be favorable to the breaking out of the 
disease. At the same time I saw to it that nourishing 
food was taken and that the daily airing of the room 
and thorough cleaning of the bedclothes were not omit- 
ted. The breaking out of the disease was increasing. 
Paul was hardly recognizable. His hair fell out and I was 
reproached by near relatives for sending Paul to the 
grave, as they said that, by ignoring all professional help, 
an accounting and severe punishment awaited me. 

I, however, had confidence and persevered. The erup- 
tion began to form into scales which by and by fell off, 
so that I could throw away a dustpanful thereof daily. 
Underneath the scales a reddened skin appeared, which 
by and by began to look white, clean and fresh. 

His confinement to the bed lasted about six weeks, and 
thirteen bottles of the Vitalizer and seven of the Oleum 
were used. Paul is now cured, with the exception of a 
single spot about the size of a hand on his abdomen. 

Is not that a miracle? Solo Deo Gloria! 

Mr. Knecht has no medicine on hand at present, and 
besides that, at the beginning of last month all at once he 
returned to America, and his wife sent me word that they 
are expecting a new supply from Dr. Peter Fahrney and 
that they had remitted for same some time ago. 

I am awaiting its arrival, and requesting other suffer- 
ers to whom I have recommended your medicine to be pa- 
tient. Four bottles have been ordered from me. 

With the aid of God I try to make known your remedies 
on all occasions. I think they are in favor with God and 
mankind. Respectfully and humbly, 

Theodore Schubert. 

The increase in the demand for the BLOOD VI- 
TALIZER in foreign countries has kept pace with the 
demand in the United States. Over thirty-two tons 
of the BLOOD VITALIZER were shipped to foreign 
ports during the year 1903. When it is remembered 
that not one line of advertising has been placed in a 
foreign newspaper, the demand for the remedy is 
simply remarkable. That the BLOOD VITALIZER 
has become known the world over can only be account- 
ed for by the fact that a knowledge of it has been im- 
parted by friend to friend and kin to kin based on per- 
sonal experience. It is a peculiar but the most ef- 
fective form of publicity. 

There are people in our own land who have heard of 
but who have not yet tried this old, time-tried herb- 
remedy. Are you one of these? DR. PETER'S 
BLOOD VITALIZER is put up for a specific pur- 
pose — the cure and benefit of sick people. It is not 
an article of commercial traffic, but is supplied to the 
people direct through special agents appointed in every 
community. For further particulars address, 



DR. PETER FAHRNEY, 



112-114 S. Hoyne Avenue, Chicago, III. 



the: ingleinook. 



STERLING, 



THE COLONY 



.ON... 



COLORADO UGUN A DE TACHE GRANT 



Just the place you are 
looking for. 

Come and See It. 



Do vou want to buy or rent an 
irrigated farm in the 

South Platte 
Valley 

Where people are prosperous 
and contented? 



The climate guarantees health. 
Irrigation means big, sure crops. 
Denver and the great mining 
■camps near by, pay good prices 
for everything you raise. 



Sterling's population is i,8oo, 
and growing. A town of churches 
and schools. No saloons or places 
•of iniquity. Three railways, Union 
Passenger Station, water works, 
electric lights, etc. 



Write us for Free Advertising 
Matter, Railroad Rates and Ex- 
cursion Dates. 



The Colorado Colony Co., 

Sterling, Colorado. 



REFERENCES-Geo. L. McDonaugh. Breth- 
rsn Colonization Agent U. P. R. R.. Omaha, 
Neb.; Eld. D. D. Culler. Principal Sterling Public 
School; Rev. A. W. Ross. Brethren Church, 
Sterling. Colo.; any bank or business house. 



...IN JTHE... 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY, CALIFORNIA. 



4tl3 



.lenliun the lAGLKNOOK when writing. 




RRETHREN OAK GROVE CHURCH AND SUNDAY SCHOOL. 



Consider the remarkable record of the colony on the Laguna. Brethren 
F. Kuckenbaker and P. R. Wagner were the first to settle in the fall of ipoi 
and were the only Brethren on the Laguna for nearly a year. November 2, 

1902, the first Brethren Sunday school was organized, with 39 members. The 
present enrollment is 198. 

Nov. 19. 1902, a Brethren church was organized, with a membership of 13. 
There are now 54 members. 

May II, 1903, the erection of a church building was begun. On July 8, 

1903, the building shown above was completed and on July 12. 1903, it was 
dedicated by Eld. S. G. Lehmer, of Los Angeles, entirely free from debt. 
The church is sixty by forty in size with a seating capacity of 400 people. 

Brethren who are seeking a new location for a home may be assured that 
they will find here people of their own faith with whom they can worship. 
Their children will be under church influence. The church is here, the min- 
ister is here, the railroads are here and the good land, the foundation of all, 
is here. There is room and a hearty welcome under the sunny skies of Cali- 
fornia awaiting all who come to take advantage of this great opportunity. 

Land sells for $35.00 to $50.00 per acre including perpetual water right. 
Terms, one-fourth cash; balance in eight annual payments. From twenty to 
forty acres will support the average family in comfort. It is the place for the 
man of small means willing to work. 

If you are tired of blizzards, cyclones, floods or drouths, come to the 
Laguna. where crops never fail and you can profitably work in the fields every 
day in the year except Sundays. 

Send your name and address and receive printed matter and our local 
newspaper free for two months. Write to 

Nares & Saunders, 

LATON, CALIFORNIA. 

5ltl3 tifntioti 11.^ lM;LfcN«H»K wneo wnOllS 



■HI 



INGI 



NOOK. 



ARE YOU GOING 



..TO. 



...CALIF ORNIA... 

Lordsbnrg, the Lagnna De Tache 
Grant, Tropico 

Or Any Other Point? Take the 

...Union Pacific Railroad... 



Daily Tourist Car Lines 



BETWEEN 



Chicago, Missouri River, Colorado, 
Utah and California Points. 



READ THIS, 



Glendora, Cal.. Jan. 5th. 1904. 
Yes, I am here, and I came here over the Union Pacific 
Route, and I am free to say that the scenery along that 
line, especially for two or three hundred miles before ar- 
riving at Sacramento, Cal., excelled anything I have ever 
seen in all my travels. It is an inspiration — view it as 
you may. Here the Bible student drinks deep from the 
fountain from whence the Bible came. The scientific 
student here enjoys a rare feast. These things show the 
handiwork of the greatest artist. A. Hutchison. 



One-Way Colonist's Rales. 

To California Every Day, March i to April 30. 

From Chicago ^33 00 

From St. Louis, 30 00 

From Missouri River 25 00 

Proportionate Rates from all Points East. 



The Union Pacific Railroad 

IS KNOWN AS 

"The Overland Route" 

And IS the only direct line from Chicago and the Missouri 
River to all principal points West. Business men and 
others can save many hours via this line. Call on or 
address a postal card to your nearest ticket agent, or Geo. 
L. McDonaugh, Colonization .Agent, Omaha, Neb. 

E. L. LOMAX, G. P. & T. A., 
Omaha, Nebraska. 



A TOWN WITH A FUTURE 

— -^ 

Snyder, Colorado, Has all the Ear-marks of a Comer and 

is Surely Destined to be One of North- 

Eastern Colorado's Leaders. 

♦ 

A few years ago the Colorado Colony Company, an in- 
stitution that has been very successful in colonizing the 
fertile irrigated lands of the South Platte valley, and 
helping to build up several of its towns, conceived the 
idea of starting a town at Snyder station on the Union 
Pacific Railway. At that time all the land around Sny- 
der was owned by one of the largest cattle companies in 
Colorado, but it has since passed into the possession of 
bankers, farmers and other investors who own 40 acre 
tracts. 

Snyder is beautifully located on the South Platte riv- 
er and Union Pacific Railway, between Sterling and Den- 
ver, extending /rom the river to the brow of a mesa, 
one-half mile avv'ay. The main street running north and 
south, is 80 feet wide; all other streets, 60 feet; alleys, 20 
feet; all lots are 25x125 feet, excepting those fronting on 
the main street, which are 25x120. 

Two years ago the Cooper irrigating canal was built, 
passing within one mile of Snyder. Last year the Farm- 
er's Canal was constructed, running directly through the 
town and this spring work is being pushed on the big 
Reagan Canal and Reservoir System, which will irrigate 
several thousand of acres of land in the mesa and valley 
back of Snyder. 

The settlement of these lands will mean more people, 
more business houses, more residences and a rapid in- 
crease in values of Snyder property. 

There is seldom much money made in buying high 
priced lots in a " boom town " that has overgrown its 
natural size and capacity and is ahead of the country, but 
such is not the case with Snyder. 

This little town with a bright future already assured 
has three general stores, two hotels, one lumber yard, 
blacksmith shop, livery stable, coal and grain dealer, con- 
tractor and builder, post office, depot and large stock 
yards, etc. There are good openings for a doctor and 
druggist, furniture store, meat market, newspaper, etc. — 
Advocate, Sterling, Colorado. 

The following parties have bought land near Snyder. 
Colo.: 

Louis E. Keltner, Hygiene, Colo. 

W. W. Keltner, North Dakota. 

A. W. Bray ton Mt. Morris, 111. 

Daniel Grabill, LeMasters, Pa. 

J. L. Kuns McPherson, Kans. 

D. L. Miller Mt. Morris, 111. 

Daniel Neikirk LeMasters, Pa. 

Galen B. Royer, Elgin, 111. 

E. Slif er Mt. Morris, 111. 

I. B. Trout Lanark. 111. 



H0MESEEKER5' EXCURSION 
to Snyder, Colorado, 

With Privilege of Stopping of! at Sterling, Colo., 

Avr pipe Plus $2.00, for the Round Trip First 
UnC rAKU and Third Tuesday of Each Month via 

Union Pacific Railroad. 



Irrigated Crops Never Fail 



■ f~V A I W ^~V is the beat-watered arid Stat« in America. Brethren are moving there because hot wiudi, 
I 1 M r\ I i V-/ destractive storms and cyclones are unknown, and with its matchless climate it makes life 
bright and worth living. 

We have great faith in what Idaho has to offer to the prospective settler and if you have in mind a change 
for the general improvememt in your condition in life, or if you are seeking a better climate on account of health, 
we believe that Idaho will meet both requirements. There is, however, only one wise and sensible thing to do; that 
is, go and see the country for yourself, as there are many questions to answer and many conditions to investigate. 

Our years of experience and travel in passenger work teach us that a few dollars spent in railroad tares te 
investigate thoroughly a new country saves thousands of dollars in years to follow. 

Cheap homeseekers' rates are made to all principal Idaho points. Take advantage of them and see for your- 
self. Selecting a new home is like selecting a wife — you want to do your own choosing. 

Settlers' One=way Rates from March 1 to April 30, 1904. 

FROM To Pocatello, Huntington, 

Idaho Falls, etc. Nampa. etc. 

Chicago, $30 00 S30 50 

St. Louis 2600 2750 

Peoria ■ 28 00 2850 

Kansas City and Omaha 20 oo 22 50 

Sioux City, 22 90 25 40 

St. Paul and Minneapolis, 22 90 25 40 



& 




MODEL RANCH, IDAHO. 



3 Alfalfa, Fruits, and Vegetables, Grow in Abundance. Fine J: 
'■% Grazing Lands, Fine Wheat. Oats and Barley. ^ 



^ Nampa, Idaho. 

:^ I came to Idaho two yean ago from the best part of eastern Kansas. I had done no work for a year oa ac- 

■ ^ count of poor health. One year here brought me all right and this year I farmed and made more money from 

'^ 80 acres than I did on 160 acres in Kansas. All my crops were fine but my potatoes were ahead, making 600 

^ bushels per acre. Joshua James. 

^ D. E. BURLEY, 

G. P. & T. A., O. S. L. R. R„ 

Salt Lake City. Utah. 



!^ S. BOCK, Brethren's Ageat, Dayton, Ohio. 

f5 J- H- QRAYBILL Brethren's Agent, Nampa, Idaho. 



Mention the INGLENOOK when writin*. 



^'!fy(t^'f\(f>'fy'»^'fy'fvty'ff^'f^'^^'t^'fVfVfV't>'f\'fy'fMf^'fVf^'»MfVfVfVfVfVf>'f^'^^'!f>'f^ 



*1 NSbENSOK 



Vol. VI 



February 16, 1904. 



Ko. 7. 



THE RAIN ON THE ROOF. 



When rhe humid shadows gather 

Over all the starry spheres, 
.A.nd the melancholy darkness 

Gently weeps in rainy tears, 
What a bliss to press the pillow 

Of a cottage-chamber bed, 
.^nd listen to the patter 

Of the soft rain overhead. 

Every tinkle on the ^:hingle 

Has an echo in the heart: 
And a thousand dreamy fancies 

Into busy being start. 
And a thousand recollections 

Weave their bright hues into woof, 
As I listen to the patter 

Of the rain upon the roof. 

Now in memory comes my mother. 

As she used, in years agone. 
To regard the darling dreamers 

Ere she left them til! the dawn; 
So I see her leaning o'er me, 

As I list to the refrain 
Which is played upon the shingles 

By the patter of the rain. 

Then my little seraph sister. 

With her wings and waving hair. 
And her star-eyed cherub brother — 

A serene, angelic pair — 
Glide around my wakeful pillow. 

With their praise or mild reproof. 
As I listen to the murmur 

Of the soft rain on the roof. 

And another comes to thrill me 

With her eyes' delicious blue; 
And I mind not, musing on her. 

That her heart was all untrue; 
I remember but to love her 

With a passion kin to pain. 
And my heart's quick pulses vibrate 

To the patter of the rain. 

There is naught of tone or cadence 

That can work with such a spell. 
In the soul's mysterious fountains. 

Whence the tears of rapture well, 
As that melody of nature. 

That subdued, subduing strain 
Which is played upon the shingles 

By the patter of the rain. 

— Coates Kinney. 



JUST A THOUGHT OR SO. 



For patience, consult a good doctor. 



The first virtue is to restrain the tonzue. 



The gossiper exists because he has listeners. 



Confess your sins and they are half conquered. 



He who has a story to tell ahvays has an audience. 



A great man ahvays recognises goodness in others. 



Warmed-over love is never quite the same thing. 



It is hard to not even get credit for good intentions. 



A society woman and a salad depend on the dress- 



Never let go because somebody else is not sure of 
you. 

Soft words, warm friends: bitter zvords, lasting ene- 
mies. 

* 

The almost universal accomplishment, — playing the 
fool. 

Nothing is szveeter than the laughter of little chil- 
dren. 

♦ 

The professional beauty is more ornamental than 
useful. 

Say little and you run less risk of making a fool 
of yourself. 

* 

You never know what you can do until you try. 
You also never know what you cannot do until you 
try. All those things work both ways. 



146 



HI 



INGLEINOOK. 



OUR CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL OF LETTER 
WRITING.— No. 2. 



One of the things which everybody should remem- 
ber is to be prompt in the matter of correspondence. 
When a letter is received by a person concerning a 
common interest, courtesy and common sense demand 
that it receive immediate attention. It is not meant 
by this that when an entire stranger writes a letter 
about something in which you have no interest what- 
ever, that you are to sit down and waste your time 
and money in answering him concerning something 
entirely foreign to you. 

For illustration, suppose some man in the city of 
Chicago should write you for the address of people 
who wear fancy shoes, and enclose an unpaid return 
envelope. Close examination shows this letter simply 
one of many, all alike, a copy in other words. Now in 
regard to this class of correspondence every one should 
use his own judgment but the practice of a good many 
people is to pay not the slightest attention to them be- 
cause there is no end to this kind of work if one un- 
dertakes it. But suppose another instance, entirely dif- 
ferent. 

Somebody writes you a letter from Elgin, we will 
say, in relation to some church topic in which there is a 
mutual interest. You do not know the writer nor 
does the writer know you. Nevertheless it is upon 
some common ground of obtaining information 
through you that could not otherwise be had. Com- 
mon courtesy demands that this letter gets an answer 
and gets it right away. Nevertheless, it is an open 
secret that out of a hundred letters sent out if fifty of 
them bring answers it is regarded as a good result. 
In other words, every other person on the average is 
indififerent or careless in the matter of correspondence. 
This is not the result of boorishness on the part of the 
off half but mainly because they have put it off until 
it is finally forgotten and they are ashamed to take it 
up. The fact that we want to inculcate in the minds 
of the readers is this, that a letter worth answering 
at all should have immediate attention. The longer 
it is put off the less force it has, and the apologies 
that it may contain when written are reflections upon 
the habits and the mental and moral make-up of the 
writer. 

Perhaps every one of us, both the writer of these 
lines and the readers thereof, have been guilty of 
this very thing, yet they assuredly are not right. It is 
just the same as though when you were walking down 
the street some friend or stranger should ask you a 
civil question, on a necessary subject, and you stalked 
on ahead without paying the slightest attention to 
what was said. If there is any difference it is in fa- 
vor of the silent person who walks away, for the 
man who has written a letter has enough in it to 



justify his trouble, and common courtesy demands that 
he receive an answer. 

Circumstances must forever govern such cases but 
the very general rule is that a personal letter should 
receive a personal reply, and this especially when a 
stamp is enclosed for a reply. There are some peo- 
ple in public life so notoriously indifferent in the com- 
monest forms of politeness that it is next to impos- 
sibleness to get a letter from them. But every person 
who is a real lady or a real gentleman will have to 
thresh around considerably to find an excuse for not 
keeping up his end of a correspondence. So much for 
liromptness in the matter. And now suppose that a 
letter has been received for answer. 

The character and make-up of a letter should depend 
upon the nature of it, hut it is a never-failing rule to 
incorporate in every letter that comes out over your 
signature every proper expression of regard and court- 
esy. 

This is held in such high esteem that a great many 
large institutions retain the services of a man who 
does nothing but answer personal letters. He has not 
the slightest interest in what he dictates to his stenog- 
rapher, and when he is through with one he has for- 
gotten its contents and the nature of his answer, but at 
the other end the recipient of the letter learns that the 
corporation has received the communication and that 
they take pleasure in replying to the information 
sought for, and the letter winds up with a statement 
that if any further service can be rendered, the com- 
pany is at his disposition and the thought is ex- 
pressed that all may turn out happily and well. 

Now it may seem to the average reader that this is 
so much empty nothing. On the contrary it is a solid 
fact that it is creditable to all parties concerned. There 
may not be much m politeness and courtesy in and of 
itself, but it makes all the difference lietween the down- 
stairs crowd and the upstairs people. So make up your 
mind before you write a letter that you are going to 
be pleasant, courteous and helpful. Of course this 
cannot be illustrated to advantage in this letter-writ- 
ing instruction, but the fact is to be impressed upon 
the mind of the reader never to let a bad or foolish 
letter go out, or anything else that is liable tn come 
kicking up against you in the future. Not only should 
things be said in good form, mechanically considered, 
but it should be reinembered that a letter is evidence 
and the very best kind of evidence. Nearly every 
breach-of-promise suit involves a half-bushel, more 
or less, of foolish letters that render both parties ri- 
diculous when they are read in open court or when 
tiirv get into the papers. So never " liang yourself'" 
witli your own hands. 

.\s a first rule we would suggest courtesy, and as a 
second, sense. It is not meant by this that people 
should suspect everybody to whom they write but 



the: iNGLENOOK. 



'47 



that they should word and phrase their letters so 
that if they were printed in big letters in a daily 
newspaper they would still reflect credit upon the 
writer. 

\Ve had hoped in this article to write the actual let- 
ter itself, but it will have to be deferred until a later 
issue. It was thought well to impress upon the minds 
i>f those who follow these instructions of the bottom 
I'.rinciples of promptness, courtesv and kindliness. 



" Every year notes of the face value nf £18,000, ocX) 
are consigned to the flames in the Bank of England 
furnace ; not all at once, of course, for that would be 
an operation too long and monotonous for the officials 
who must be present to witness it to take at one sitting. 

■■ Five thousand notes of various denominations are 
daily issued by the bank, and in packets of fifty thou- 
sand notes they are destroyed. But ere it is burned 
a return note is kept m the bank note library for five 




AN ORCHARD SCENE ALONG THE SOUTHERN PACIFC RAILWAY. 



With these feelings in view we are now, in the next 
issue, ready to construct the letter itself. 

(TO BE CONTrNUED. ) 

♦ •!• •!• 

DESTRUCTION OF BANK NOTES. 



" Few persons are aware that a Bank of England 
note leaves that bank but once and that the moment the 
old lady of Threadneedle street regains possession of 
the crisp sheet of paper its doom is sealed, even 
though it has been but five minutes in circulation," said 
H. J. Carmichael, a London banker. 

" Like the Imperial Bank of Germanv, our national 
banking institution destroys its old notes by fire, but 
the Bank of France and the United States treasury pre- 
fer to destroy their old paper currency by chernical 
processes, though the first-mentioned used also to in- 
dulge in bank note bonfires. 



\ears, in case it may be required for reference. It is 
one of seventy-seven million notes, the number usually 
in stock, but if it is required it can be turned up in 
five minutes, so perfect is the system of filing. This 
dead stock is kept in thirteen thousand four hundred 
boxes, each of which measures eighteen inches in 
length by ten inches in width and nine inches in depth. 
" Before they are burned a hole is punched through 
the figure giving the value and the chief cashier's 
signature is torn off. They are packed into the fur- 
nace while the officials look on, the fire is lighted and in 
a short while a little ash is all that remains of what at 
one time represented many thousands of British sov- 



You have not fulfilled every duty, unless you have 
fulfilled that of being pleasant. — Charles Bu.rton. 



148 



HE INGLEINOOK. 



WHAT'S IN A NAME. 



The following article was taken from the Kansas 
City Times and is said to be a reproduction of a 
speech made In' a manufacturer of Postum cotfec at 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Mr. C. W. Post lives at Battle Creek, Mich., where 
such things as Postum are made, and he tells how 
his food product has been boosted into notoriety by ad- 
vertising. He also tells, and this is why we repro- 
duce the article here, how a lot of competitors set 
upon him and how he disposed of them. The moral 
side of the whole business does not seem to enter into 
consideration, and Postum coffee at five cents per 
package under another name, refused by people who 
bought it under another label which they were ac- 
customed to at twenty-five cents per package, shows 
the general public is willing to swallow a good many 
things besides cereal coflfee. 

During the first year that Postum Food Coffee was 
put on the market it was a novelty and attracted the at- 
tention, through the newspapers, of a great many 
people. It took over a year to experiment and perfect 
the article so that it was meritorious and worthy, before 
it was offered to the public. Then began the construc- 
tion of the halo. This required a great many thou- 
sands of dollars and the help of the newspapers and 
magazines. Between us we succeeded in making a 
very fit halo, and Postum became popular, at twenty- 
five cents per package, in all parts of the country. 

The first year I made about $176,000, then the drove 
of buzzards that are always roosting on the fence watch- 
ing for some choice bones to pick, hopped down on 
the ground and proposed to share the halo with me. 
Factories started up in all parts of the country, making 
imitations of Postum Food Coft'ee. These were put 
upon the market at fifteen cents per package, as com- 
pared with twenty-five cents for Postum, in order to 
supply the demand which I had created and 
supply it at three-fifths of the price ; in other words, 
these imitators started to make use of my halo to make 
money and take away my business. 

I knew they had not gone through the training nec- 
essary to fit them to produce a thoroughly meritorious 
article. They were not food experts, they were simply 
commercial pirates and it took upwards of $100,000 of 
money that year to tell the people through the columns 
of the press the difference between the meritorious 
original article and the imitations ; notwithstanding 
this the shelves of the retail grocers were filled with 
these imitation products, many times seven to ten vari- 
eties, and when a customer called for Postum Cereal 
Coffee he was told, " Yes, we have it, but we have just 
as good an article for fifteen cents." The merchant 
made a little more money on the imitation than on the 
original. 



This work going on all over the country told heavily 
on the sale of Postum and that year closed with a loss 
of upwards of forty thousand dollars for us. 

I concluded to twist the wrist of some of 'these pi- 
rates even if it did seem a little cruel to them. I con- 
sidered that inasmuch as they were commercially seek- 
ing my life's blood I might put aside the feeling of 
compassion and hammer them to a finish if possible. 

I organized a new company, produced a new pack- 
age, and called the product " Monk's Brew," announc- 
ing on the package that the cereal coffee contained 
therein was the equal of any cereal coffee made, and to 
he sold at five cents per package. I was justified in 
making the announcement of quality, for having fa- 
cilities to produce tremendous quantities of Postum 
1 simply filled these packages with genuine Postum,^ 
l)ut under a different name as you will observe, an 
unadvertised name ; in other words a product without 
a halo. 

Please understand that the sale of these packages at 
five cents was a direct and heavy loss, for Postum 
could not be produced for that price, but the move- 
ment was made for a purpose. I proposed to give the 
merchants a good package of cereal coffee that could 
he used in the cheap trade and a gentle but emphatic 
hint to those who had broken throvigh my fences to 
go back into the tall and uncut weeds — their natural 
habitat. 

- When this product was placed on the market there 
was consternation all along the line. There was abso- 
lutely no way for the imitators to meet this price and 
they died promptly and violently on all sides. The 
field made me think of the floor of a room that had 
been buzzing with flies until some cruel man placed 
plates of poisoned fly paper about. You could see 
dead flies in every spot, lying of: their backs with their 
feet in the air in permanent, peaceful rest. The slaugh- 
ter was a massacre, plain and simple, although no one 
could complain under the circumstances. 

That was the commercial lesson — now for the adver- 
tising lesson and the value of the halo. 

After the storm was over and the buzzing flies put 
to sleep I discovered that the 5-cent packages did not 
sell. The movement had killed the whole cereal cofl'ee 
[jroposition with the one lone exception of Postum. 

It has always been a rule of our house to ])roniptly 
move any excess stock of our manufacture that any 
merchant wholesale or retail, might have on hand, and 
to pay such merchant promjitly for such excess. Soon 
a few car loads of " Monk's Brew " began to come 
back to our factories. Word went round Battle Creek 
that " Post had busted, Postum is coming back," l)ut 
it was not Postum that was coming back ; it was the 
five-cent packages of " Monk's Brew." 

We had all of those packages opened to make sure 



HI 



inoi_e:nook. 



149 



that the contents were in first class condition, then it 
was poured into g:enuine Postum cartons, sealed up, 
sent back to the trade, decorated with the halo — and 
that halo was the well-advertised name of Postum — 
and that same Postum that had been offered to the 
consumer in the " Monk's Brew " packages without a 
halo at five cents and failed to sell, sold as promptly as 
so many gold dollars after being placed in the Postum 
cartons at twenty-five cents, or five times the price. 



out his poll tax. In his petition for exemption he 
made the following statement : 

" I am a large and fleshy man, weighing 220 pounds, 
and have been so since the summer of 1901, except 
during cold weather. I was partially overcome b)' 
heat in 1894 and igoi and since then I do not dare to do 
manual labor or indulge in any but slight bodily exer- 
cise, or exertion, for fear of being overpowered by the 
heat. I have suffered with violent headaches and dizzy 



.;^^'-, ''^fivi^' 




AN EXCURSION UP THE COLUMBIA RIVER. 



That was a clear, indisputable case, demonstrating 
the tremendous importance of the halo; and that halo 
was constructed by the newspapers, working in con- 
junction with vour humble servant. 



^ ^ ^ 
TOO FAT. 



Because he was so fat he feared the consequences 
of working in the hot summer sun, O. W. Emmons, a 
student of the Iowa College of Law, at Iowa City, pe- 
titioned the city council to exempt him from working 



spells this summer. My work is all indoors, being that 
of a student. I feel that to labor in the sun would be 
to endanger my life. I am able to prove the foregoing 
statements." 

A resolution was introduced exempting Emmons 
from working out his poll tax on the roads this sum- 
mer, but providing that he must shovel snow for the 
amount next winter. The resolution passed. 

By the same token the Nookman should be exempted 
from doing any kind of work at all. The difficulty 
lies in making people see it. 



I50 



THI 



iNGLENOOK. 



i-»»»»^-4>4Mi»;»>.;«» ■ ! ■ » » » » » . t ■ > ■ { ■ ■ » ■ » . 1 . i . . 1 . » » » ■ ! ■ » ■ ! . . t . » » » » . ! ■ - V » - t » -t- ■ ! • •!■ ■!■ •> * * * ■ ! • » ■ 



The Inglenook Nature Study Club 



This Department of the Inglenook is the organ of the various Nature Study Clubs that may be organized 
over the country. Each issue of the magazine will be complete in itself. Clubs may be organized at any time, 
taking the work up with the current issue. Back numbers cannot be furnished. Any school desiring to or- 
ganize a club can ascertain the methods of procedure by addressing the Editor of the Inglenook, Elgin, 111. 



'• 4>4»*»J**^4>'S^ 



!• *<►♦♦<«! 






^*V V *** V V 'J* V v *** 



FROM THE MAYOR OF ELGIN. 



Elgin. Ill, Jan. 30. 1904. 
To the Editor of the Inglenook: — 

The Inglenook came to me yesterday and found me 
sick in bed. I have always enjoyed the Inglenook much, 
and wa.s quite interested in an article entitled. " Why 
Mankind Love Dogs." But my interest in same had a 
large intermixture of indignation by reason of your low 
estimate of the horse. The only apology I find myself 
able to make for you is that your experience with the 
horse must have been unusually unfortunate. Even in 
the dog family we find " yellow dogs," and sometimes find 
streaks of yellow in the horse. Why, my dear Mr. Edi- 
tor, the affection of a well-bred horse to a kind master 
and friend is simply wonderful. He will know your foot- 
step and voice as quickly as your wife, and his intelligent 
whinny is good to hear. 

I sometimes think heaven would be lonesome without 
the horse. Please do not forget to give the horse fair 
play. 

(Signed) A. H. Hubbard. 

COMMENT. 

The above story from the Mayor of Elgin city is 
cheerfully put on record as his expression of affection 
for the horse. There is no doubt but that many a 
horse, especially out on the frontier, forms an attach- 
ment for his owner that is truly wonderful in its depth 
and permanency, and no word of the Inlgenook is to 
be raised against the value of the animal and his re- 
lation to man. That is the sentimental side of it. 

On the other hand, there is a scientific aspect of the 
case and this places the dog far and away ahead of 
the horse in affection and attachment. It is due to the 
different brain make-up of the two animals. A dog 
that weighs fifty pounds is a good-sized one. A horse 
that weighs a thousand pounds is not unusual. The 
brain of the horse ought to weigh twenty times that of 
the dog, but we know that this is not the case. 

Moreover, a man, his horse and dog come home to- 
gether at night. If the horse is cast loose and the 
dog untied from under the wagon, each having his 
freedom of choice, the chances are that the dog will be 
on the back porch curled up and waiting for his master 
to appear and then the man and the dog will go look- 
ing up the horse and asking the neighbors if tliey 
have seen him anywhere. The facts arc that the only 
animal that man has ever domesticated that will stay 
by him under all circumstances is the dog. Every last 
one of the so-called domestic animals will go wild if it 



has a chance. You can retain \our dog personally, and 
his affection for you is undying. He will stay with 
you when you are buried and will die on your grave. 
Let your horse and cattle go and where are they? 

Just how much of the mental action of animals is 
due to what we call intelligence and how much of it 
is purely accidental and automatic has never been set- 
tled. It seems to belong to the same class of manifes- 
tations that causes the tendril of the morning-glory or 
pole bean to describe a circle and keep it up until it 
fastens on soine support, and so a great deal of the 
so-called intelligence of animals, which we call in- 
stinct is a convenient term for covering up our igno- 
rance, and is supposed to be automatic without any 
affection worth noting. 

Both the horse and the dog have occupied places in 
the hearts of men for ages, and far be it from the 
Nookman to belittle either of them, but, on the con- 
trary, horse and dog stories are called for from the 
Nook family, and our columns are wide open for the 
Mayor of Elgin as well as all others. 
♦ •:■• ♦ 
FROM A BEE MAN. 



Palis.^des, Colo. 
The Inglenook: — 

Your article on " Making a Queen Bee " in your is- 
sue of Jan. 19th was interesting to me, as I have given 
bees and bee literature close study for years. 

Allow me to say that the article agrees with m\ 
knowledge of bees in all points except one, viz : " It 
is one of the remarkable things of itisect life that the 
sex can be changed by a variation in the food." This 
quotation from the article I question. 

-\ny good authority on bees will tell yi.ni that the 
workers are simply undeveloped females, or females 
developed to the point where they are especially fitted 
to care for, and not reproduce their species. 

It is quite probable that the royal jelly furnished the 
larva-queen does not differ from that fed to the other 
larvae except in its abundance. 

It is well known to bee men that, if a colony should 
become queenless, not having larvae or eggs for the 
rearing of another queen, one or several workers will 
endeavor to assume the duties of the queen in laying 

eggs. 

JTowever, eggs from such a source are often fnund 



the: inglenook. 



151 



from two to six or more in a cell, and if thev are cared 
for by the bees and fed, they will be capped as drones, 
and when they hatch they will all be drones. The 
capping on drone brood is raised or rounded over each 
cell, while the worker brood is flat. 

The queen, when hatched, is known by the bee men 
as a virgin, and When she is five or six days old she 
conies from the hive, unnoticed by the bees, and flies 
away, perhaps a mile or farther, to where she is at- 
tracted by the noise of a great meeting of drones. 
Here, in midair, she is mated to a drone, in which act 
the drone loses his life, and the queen returns to her 
hive to begin laying eggs in a few days, which she 
may continue to do in the proper seasons for her 
entire life of four or five years, without ever mating 
again. 

Should a queen reach the laying age, — ten or four- 
teen days, — without mating, she will begin laying eggs 
anyway, but all of her progeny will be drones, which, 
of course, will not add to the strength of the colony. 

A mated queen can, at will, lay eggs which will 
produce drones. However, her chief business is the 
laying of eggs that will produce workers. During the 
swarming season she will lay eggs in queen cells or 
rather the beginning of queen cells. In swarming 
times drones fly from their hives at four or five o'clock 
in the afternoon, and those within a radius of a mile 
or two seem to have a common meeting place, high in 
the air, out of sight, where they circle about for half 
an hour, attracting the attention, by their noise, of any 
■ queens that may be taking their first flight. 

Yours very trul)^ 

F. R. Roe. 

41 •i> •> 

HOW THE BEE STINGS YOU. 



Probably every reader of the Inglenook has been 
stung by bees, more or less often. It is a sensation 
not to be forgotten, although people who work among 
bees continually are said to get so saturated with the 
poison that it has comparatively little effect upon them. 

The organ which contains the poison is about the 
size of a small mustard seed, and is located in the ab- 
domen of the bee. The poison itself is made in two 
long tubes, each of which is terminated at its upper 
•extremity by a small, round bag. In the last ring of 
the bee's abdomen, connected with the poison sack, is 
a firm and sharp shaft, open its whole length. This 
•contains the bee's sting, and acts independently of it. 
The bee can thrust this shaft out of the abdomen at 
will. The sting proper is composed of two spears of 
polished horny substance, and these make a very sharp 
weapon. On occasions, these two spears come out of 
the shaft about two-thirds of their length. Between 
them, and on each of them, is a small groove, through 
-which the poison is ejected into the wound. 



Each one of these two shafts is barbed like a fish- 
hook and has about nine barbs. When a bee is pre- 
pared to sting you, one of these spears, being a little 
longer than the other, is thrust into you and catches 
on the first barb. The next then comes along and they 
alternate in pushes, until the full length of the sting is 
inserted. The muscles that move the sting are so 
small as to be invisible, yet they are of sufficient 
strength to force the sting into the hide of any ani- 
mal. Placed under the microscope, the bee's sting is a 
highly-polished needle-pointed shaft, much finer than 
anything that man could possibly make. 

If left to itself, the bee will turn in such a way as 
to drive the sting in perpendicularly, and then turning 
roimd and round she can screw the sting out and 
thus retain her stinging powers. Ordinarily, though 
not always, she stings obliquely and cannot turn about 
and work the stingers out and they are pulled out of 
her body. It is often said that when a bee stings you 
and the stinger is pulled out, that the bee dies. This 
is not always the case, though generally when the 
stinger is torn away, a part of the intestine is torn oif , 
when the bee dies. 

The beiJ which has lost its stinger and yet lives is 
more curious and angrier than she otherwise would be, 
when she possessed her weapons of warfare. It is 
not understood why this is the case, as it is ordinarily 
true that once an animal's means of defense are gone, it 
becomes pacific in its nature. Every Nooker knows 
that dehorning a mad bull takes the fight all out of him. 
The exact opposite is the case with the bee which has 
lost its stinger and yet survives the operation. 

Another peculiarity about the stinger of a bee is 
that the poison has a peculiar odor, which, when no- 
ticed by other bees, makes them angry and the desire 
seems to be for all to sting in the same place the 
original one did. Left to itself, the poison of the bee 
soon evaporates and disappears. 

^ '*$*' ^ 

A WISE HORSE. 



Mr. E. E. KitcHj of VanBuren, Ind., writes that he 
has a horse that will answer to his call. He drives 
this horse to town and leaves her standing around. 
When he is ready to go home he calls her and she 
answers the call. He says the secret lies in being 
kind to the animal and not whipping it, because it does 
not know what is wanted. 

This principle is a correct one, but it would not do 
here in Elgin, for him to leave his horse untied. When 
he wanted it he would have to call at the police head- 
quarters for it, and also pay a fine for leaving it untied. 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

The queen, honey-bee is the only perfect female in 
the hive, and she often lays more than 3,500 eggs each 
dav for several weeks in succession. 



15^ 



the: ingleinook. 



WHAT ANTS DO WITH THEIR FOES. 

Dr. H. C. McCook tells of a species of kidnapping 
ants, which make organized attacks on other ant vil- 
lages for the purpose of capturing slaves. Here is an 
account of the attack. 

At last the muster is complete. Mysteriously but 
efifectively the signal " Forward ! " is given and the 
column moves from the hill. There is no regular 
alignment, but a show of solidarity, a holding of the 
ranks within close compass and touch, a " rout step," 
in fact. There is no general ; there are no subordi- 
nate officers, but such is the sympathetic unity that they 
seem to move in response to one will and command. 
If every warrior is a law unto himself the law so binds 
and animates and compels all alike that the ends of 
an organized cohort are served. 

Assault, battle and pillage follow quickly up the 
sortie. The objective point of the march is not far 
away. A hundred yards distant is a Fuscan village. 
The route thereto lies across the edge of a grove, over 
a footpath, along a fallen tree, under whose shelter 
and shaded by tufts of grass is the devoted commune. 
It is feeble in numbers and there is a bare show of 
defense as the freebooters hurl themselves upon the 
hill and plunge into the open gates. The villagers 
flee at the first onset through unassailed or secret pas- 
sages. Some run the gauntlet through the assaulting 
ranks. All who can, carry a part of the family treas- 
ures, eggs, larvce and pupae. Like their brobdingnag- 
ian brothers of the human race, when disaster befalls, 
their first care is for their offspring. The fugitives 
mount into nearby clumps of low wood plants, whence 
they look down upon the devastation of their homes, 
with what feelings? For some must suppose that the 
midgets do feel, though sometimes he would fain hope 
otherwise. 

Meanwhile the invaders issue from tlie gates, bear- 
ing in their jaws the Fuscan young and occasionally 
an adult. They take the home trail, but not in 
ordered ranks. It is go-as-you-please now. They are 
welcomed back by their black confederates, who re- 
ceive the captives and take them, their very own sis- 
ters perhaps, into the domestic quarters. The soldiers 
hurry back to the scene of action, for their work is 
not yet finished. 

♦ •:•• •:- 

HORSES SMELL THE LAND. 



Guiness thought land should soon be sighted he asked 
the captain how far the ship was from the Irish coast. 
The commander of the steamer, in his usual grufi 
manner, replied : " Your horse will tell you ; watch 
him." 

The owner of the animal could not understand what 
the captain meant, and he was not particularly pleased 
with the answer. Finally, however, and in a couple of 
hours before land was observed, the horse, which was 
a magnificent bay, poked his head through the grating 
and, stretching his neck, whinnied loudly. "' There you 
are," said the captain to Mr. McGuiness. " Your 
horse smells the land." The horse was like a different 
animal thereafter, until the coast loomed up. The cap- 
tain, in explaining the odd occurrence, said that the 
thoroughbred detected the odor from pasture lands that 
was wafted far seaward, and that horses on board 
ocean steamers always give the first signal when land 
is near. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

LITTLE FACTS ABOUT THE PYGMIES. 



Thicy are the real dwarfs of the human family. 

Few of them are taller than four feet. 

A hungry Akka can eat sixty-five bananas. 

They leap around in the grass like grasshoppers. 

They are courageous, and know how to fight. 

They are great elephant hunters. 

They delight to see anything suffer. 

They are dull brown in color when full-blooded. 

They are well-built, with big heads and small necks. 

The husband rules outside the house, and the wife 
inside. 

The adults play like children. 

They have very big stomachs. 

They were once a big nation in Africa, but have 
been diminished by wars with their larger neighbors. 

There is a big colony -of them on the Itin-i river, 
and they occupy much of the interior of Africa be- 
tween the sources of the Nile and Congo rivers. 

Two Akka have been successfully taken to Europe, 
and have survived there, but the most of those taken 
from their native forest have died on the wav out. 

The Akka make excellent servants. They are quick, 
intelligent and always alert. 

An Akka looks very singular when seen from the 
rear. The back is curved in so far that every man 
of them looks like a graduate from a military school. 



The ability of horses to smell land when far at sea 
is not generally known, but an announcement made to- 
day shows that the equine must be credited with this 
acute sense. When Thomas McGuiness, a well-known 
horseman of Philadelphia, went to Europe some time 
ago he took a blooded horse with him. The animal 
was in a specially prepared stall on deck, and enjoyed 
the trip, despite the rough weather. When Mr. Mc- 



SUNSHINE DOWN A WELL. 



A cuKious phenomenon has been noticed in the 
tropics that can never be seen at higher latitudes. A 
mining shaft at Sombrerete. Mexico, is almost exactly 
on the tropic of Cancer, and at noon on June 21 the 
sun shines to the bottom, lighting up the well for a 
vertical depth of 1,100 feet or more. 



the: ingleinook. 



t53 



FISH THAT LEAVE THE WATER. 



WHAT A PARTRIDGE CARRIED IN ITS FOOT. 



[i is commonly supposed that all fish die very soon 
after being taken from the water. There are excep- 
tions, however, to the rule. There is the " stare- 
about," a kind of goby that at ebb tide walks calmly 
up on the sand banks erect on two huge fore fins. With 
his gigantic goggle eyes he keeps a sharp lookout for 
crabs and such things as are left behind by the receding 
water. Then we all know that eels can wriggle, snake- 
like, miles across the meadow to other ponds and riv- 
ers. 

In Holland carp are kept all winter hung up in a net 
and sprinkled only occasionally with water. The In- 
dian " shake-head " is quite happy even when his na- 
tive pond dries up, and lies torpid till the next rainy 
season. The flying gurnard will keep ahead of an 
ocean liner going at full speed and fly for many min- 
utes in quick successive flights of 300 yards or so at 
a time. So, granted that the .average fish prefers wa- 
ter, some of them, at any rate, can do very well out 
of it. 

♦ ♦ ♦> 

THE OYSTER. 



There is only one kind of oyster after all, and that 
is the Ostrea virginica found along the eastern coast of 
North America. The western, or Pacific coast, has at 
least five species, but only two of them are of any 
account for food. What constitutes the difference be- 
tween a high-class food oyster and one not so good is 
not in the location where it is found, but in the extent 
and character of the food present, on which it feeds. 
As a rule the Inglenook reader who lives remote from 
the coast has to learn to eat oysters, and the taste is 
often acquired with much effort. Some people never 



bring themselves to it. 



♦ ♦ ♦ 



THE LONGEST MANE AND TAIL IN THE WORLD. 



A HORSE has been exhibited at one of the English 
horse shows which is believed to have the longest mane 
and tail of any horse in the world. The mane, which 
was particularly rich and thick, measured 10 feet 
8 inches in length. The tail was nearly 7 feet long. 
The hair was peculiarly soft and glossy. 



WHEN SNAKES SLEEP. 



As a rule, venomous snakes sleep by day and wander 
abroad in the shade of evening to seek food or drink 
or meet their mates in the wood patch. During the 
day each will be found in his peculiar habitat coiled up 
in some retired spot where the feet of men or beasts 
are not wont to disturb. 



A MAN once grew no less than eighty-two plants 
from a ball of clay taken from a foot of a partridge. 
This shows how all sorts of plants are carried about 
from one place to another by birds, and, of course, not 
only by birds, but by every living creature. 

* ♦ * 
TENACITY OF MICROBE LIFE. 



The latest indignities that microbes have been sub- 
jected to is firing them from a gun. This was done by- 
government officials, and it was found that the bugs 
were not injured. 

♦ ♦ ♦!• 

One of the reasons wh}- animals do not successfully 
raise their young when in captivity is because their 
nerves are overwrought by confinement. Angered 
by the presence of bars and by the excitement of the 
throng of sightseers the mother very frequently de- 
stroys her young cubs. These cubs are often very in- 
teresting and attractive specimens of the animal kind. 
They are practically big, lubberly kittens, and have 
all the playfulness and kindliness of house cats. Now 
and then some strong, healthy animal mother will rear 
her young ones, but it is often the case that she has to 
be watched to keep her from killing them. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

All living bumblebees, at this writing, in the State of 
Illinois, and every other State, for that matter, are 
queens. They will start out in the spring and con- 
struct a nest for themselves, lay eggs which will hatch 
out and thus make a start for a nest full of bumblebees, 
in which all but the females die or perish at the first 
approach of winter, leaving the queens the only sur- 
vivors. 

♦ ♦ * 

It may not be generally known that insects are born 
as large as they ever will be, though many a Nooker 
will be disposed to doubt this statement, and question 
it, saying that he has seen little flies and big flies. 
The really significant fact is" that he has seen different 
varieties of flies, and they, like the mosquito, are as 
big as they ever will be when they are born. 



x\ fossilized egg, preserved in a hard nodule, is 
the rare curiosity which the University of California 
geological department is now carefully examining, with 
the hope of ultimately acquiring. 

>:« ♦ •■> 

It has been demonstrated that fruit exposed for 
sale on the fruit stands accumulates countless thou- 
sands of bacteria. 



^54 



the: inglenook. 



mllCLtKnOKL 

A \?L^eek:ly Magrazine 

...PUBLISHED BV... 

BRETHREN PUBLISHING HOUSE, ELGIN, LLL. 
Subscription Price, $1.00 per Annum. 



The Tnglenook is a publication devoted to interesting and entertaining 
literature. It contains nothing of a character to prevent its presence in 
any home. 

Contributions are solicited, but there is no guarantee either of their ac- 
ceptance or return. All contributions are carefully read, and if adapted 
to the scope and policy of the magazine, will be used. The management 
will not be responsible for unsolicited article. 

Agents are wanted, and specimen numbers will be supplied as needed. 

In giving a change of address state where you are now getting the pa- 
per, as otherwise the change cannot be made. Subscriptions may be made 
at any time, either for a year or part of a year. Address, 

Brethren Publishing House, 
(For the Inglenook.) 22-24 South State St., ELGIN, ILL. 

Entered at the Post Office at Elgin, 111., as Second-class Matter. 

Be still, O heart! cease fearing, fretting 

About the future, all unknown. 
Ne'er think the Master is forgetting 

About his own — his purchased one. 

— Jean H. Watson. 
♦ ♦ •> 

WAR. 



than the angels, and very (iften they belie their al- 
leged creation bv acting like devils altogether. 



Every reader must have noticed the newspaper talk 
about the possibilities of war between Russia and 
Japan. While, at this particular writing, it has not 
materialized into an actual fact, yet there is no tell- 
ing when the little brown man and the big bearded 
man may be face to face with each other. A peculiar- 
ity about it is that each side deplores the necessity 
for war, and hopes it may be averted, and, while they 
are giving expression to these pacific utterances, each 
is preparing for the conflict. 



Somebody has said that there was never such a thing 
as a good war or a bad peace. Those who have seen 
war and its bloodstains will be very apt to agree with 
this statement. It is a remarkable fact that, for all 
the vaunted civilization of the world, one does not 
have to scratch nations or individuals very deep until 
he comes to the fighting blood that is in them. ,Very 
gradually the world is being educated into the fact 
that violence is wrong. But it will be some time be- 
fore nations will become sensible of the fact. As it is, 
European nations have to support a standing army in 
the field, or ready for it, and every man who is not 
in the ranks is at work with a soldi'er on his back, 
so to speak. It is not good politics and it is not 
good sense, but it is the survival of the animal sense 
in men, who are supposed to be created a little lower 



War never settled anything in a moral way. Very 
often moral issues have cropped out as a result, which 
were not because of war but in spite of it. There 
never yet was a war which might not have been 
averted, if the leaders had come together and talked 
sense along the lines of the Sermon on the Mount. 
But, on the contrary, there has been hatched up and 
fostered in the public mind a spirit of what they are 
pleased to call patriotism, which is more of the nature 
of hysterics in the eyes of the people than of any 
actual facts. Patriotic man is supposed to be willing 
to go out and fight the other fellow, and get killed 
for something he does not understand. 



One of the things in connection with war is seen in 
the seemingly religious turn that is given it by the 
chaplains. Two columns of men stand facing each 
other in the field. Before they get to work at each 
other, two alleged men of God stand by, paid by their 
respective countries and invoke the blessing of God 
on the battle. Both cannot be right and the Nook 
believes that neither is doing the right thing, but 
a prayer goes up to the God of love and it is asking 
for a blessing upon them, to kill somebody in the 
cause they represent. Did it ever occur to the Nook 
reader that such a travesty on Christianity is enough 
to make the angels weep and the devils laugh? One 
of the greatest of our own soldiers has said, " War 
is hell." Think of asking the blessing of God on 
hell! 



Considering the character of the cause of most 
wars, it is difficult to see what interest the average 
common soldier has in the attack. Take the case of 
Russia and its tax-ridden serfs. They round them 
up like so many cattle, put a gun into their hands 
and take them thousands of miles away from home to 
fight out the quarrels of the Czar, and try to kill a 
lot of people in whom they ought to have nothing 
but the kindliest of interest. They must fight the bat- 
tles of one man who had them as beasts of burden all 
his life, and all his family before him, and all who 
come after him as well. It would be much better for 
the world, and all those who live in it, if every gun 
was broken, and the world made to blossom as the 
rose, instead of wetting it with the blood of fellow 
creatures, who ought to love one another instead of 
hating. 



Possibly, at some future age o